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Old 06-09-2009, 09:09 AM
 
19,216 posts, read 12,982,827 times
Reputation: 2337

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rscalzo View Post
Wait until the next airliner flies into a building. then everyone will be demanding answers why the government didn't know about the plot. 9/11 won't be the last incident in this country. The next might make it look like a non-event. Maybe a city gets wiped off the map.

Then will those techniques to get information still deemed "too awful"? Doubt it.
Are you suggesting we waterboard Dick to find out who the terrorists were behind 911?
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Old 06-09-2009, 09:10 AM
 
Location: NY
2,007 posts, read 3,447,115 times
Reputation: 905
Terrorists are terrorists. Waterboard the bastard!
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Old 06-09-2009, 09:21 AM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,890,268 times
Reputation: 18049
We may need to waterboard some of the gang memebrs in prison to save alot of lifes by finding out the complete orgnaiztion of these domestic terrorist gangs. It will save alot of innocent lifes. Then charge all of them with organized criminal activity then senf them all to Gitmo.. OP may have come up with a solution to the gang problem that has been terrorizing cities for decades.
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Old 06-09-2009, 09:33 AM
 
3,854 posts, read 3,742,070 times
Reputation: 557
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeepejeep View Post
Terrorists are terrorists. Waterboard the bastard!
AN HONEST ANSWER......thank you.
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Old 06-09-2009, 09:37 AM
 
Location: Redondo Beach, CA
7,343 posts, read 7,134,165 times
Reputation: 7529
Quote:
Originally Posted by AeroGuyDC View Post

I don't recall that EHT was ever used on American citizens, nor will it be, so your point is as moot as it gets.
Just because you don't recall something, doesn't mean it didn't happen. For the record:
Quote:
. . .

Cases of waterboarding have occurred on U.S. soil, as well. In 1983, Texas Sheriff James Parker was charged, along with three of his deputies, for handcuffing prisoners to chairs, placing towels over their faces, and pouring water on the cloth until they gave what the officers considered to be confessions. The sheriff and his deputies were all convicted and sentenced to four years in prison.

. . .

Waterboarding: A Tortured History : NPR
So I guess his point isn't moot at all. (Especially since you seem to have missed the point entirely.)
Quote:
Originally Posted by rscalzo View Post

Wait until the next airliner flies into a building. then everyone will be demanding answers why the government didn't know about the plot. 9/11 won't be the last incident in this country. The next might make it look like a non-event. Maybe a city gets wiped off the map.

Then will those techniques to get information still deemed "too awful"? Doubt it.
No, everyone won't be demanding use of those techniques to get information. Some of us understand that not only is it illegal and immoral, but it is also unreliable.
Quote:
The CIA inspector general in 2004 found that there was no conclusive proof that waterboarding or other harsh interrogation techniques helped the Bush administration thwart any "specific imminent attacks," according to recently declassified Justice Department memos.

. . .

The IG's report is among several indications that the Bush administration's use of abusive interrogation methods was less productive than some former administration officials have claimed.

Even some of those in the military who developed the techniques warned that the information they produced was "less reliable" than that gained by traditional psychological measures, and that using them would produce an "intolerable public and political backlash when discovered," according to a Senate Armed Services Committee report released on Tuesday.

. . .

CIA official: No proof harsh techniques stopped terror attacks | McClatchy
Quote:
My Tortured Decision

by Ali Soufan, an F.B.I. supervisory special agent from 1997 to 2005

. . .

There was no actionable intelligence gained from using enhanced interrogation techniques on Abu Zubaydah that wasn’t, or couldn’t have been, gained from regular tactics. In addition, I saw that using these alternative methods on other terrorists backfired on more than a few occasions — all of which are still classified. The short sightedness behind the use of these techniques ignored the unreliability of the methods, the nature of the threat, the mentality and modus operandi of the terrorists, and due process.

. . .

The debate after the release of these memos has centered on whether C.I.A. officials should be prosecuted for their role in harsh interrogation techniques. That would be a mistake. Almost all the agency officials I worked with on these issues were good people who felt as I did about the use of enhanced techniques: it is un-American, ineffective and harmful to our national security.

. . .

The New York Times > Log In
Quote:
Unresolved debate: Does torture work?

. . .

In 2006, a group of scientists and retired intelligence officers set out to settle the matter. They sought to find the most effective interrogation tactics and advise the U.S. government on their use. Their conclusions, laid out in a 372-page report for the director of national intelligence, argued against harsh interrogation.

“The scientific community has never established that coercive interrogation methods are an effective means of obtaining reliable intelligence information,” former military interrogation instructor and retired Air Force Col Steven M Kleinman wrote in the Intelligence Science Board report. “In essence, there seems to be an unsubstantiated assumption that ‘compliance’ carries the same connotation as ‘meaningful cooperation.’”

In short: Slam someone up against the wall, keep him awake for days, lock him naked in a cell and slap his face enough, and he will probably say something. That doesn’t necessarily make it true.

. . .

Unresolved debate: Does torture work? › Japan Today: Japan News and Discussion
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Old 06-09-2009, 09:53 AM
 
1,253 posts, read 3,122,327 times
Reputation: 767
Well because he shot an abortion doctor, silly.
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Old 06-09-2009, 10:13 AM
 
596 posts, read 765,832 times
Reputation: 1080
I am pro-life, but based on Roeder's statements, I think waterboarding would be totally appropriate for him. Murder is never, ever justified.
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Old 06-09-2009, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Blankity-blank!
11,449 posts, read 14,308,172 times
Reputation: 6904
Quote:
Originally Posted by Austin13 View Post
Because Scott Roeder's actions fall within the category of domestic terrorism, and because he made a statement to the press that there were other such acts of domestic terrorism being planned in the U.S., WHY are those people who SUPPORT "Enhanced Interrogation Techniques" for terrorists NOT calling for such interrogation of Scott Roeder in order to try to find out exactly which doctors who provide legal reproductive services for women are "next" on the "list" so to speak?
He is a hero to many. A martyr who is being unjustly treated. Heros should never be subject to interrogation. Could it be that Kansas plans to erect a large statue of him somewhere in the state?
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Old 06-09-2009, 10:19 AM
 
23,851 posts, read 19,844,563 times
Reputation: 9383
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jill61 View Post
Just because you don't recall something, doesn't mean it didn't happen. For the record: So I guess his point isn't moot at all. (Especially since you seem to have missed the point entirely.) No, everyone won't be demanding use of those techniques to get information. Some of us understand that not only is it illegal and immoral, but it is also unreliable.
LOL a sheriff broke the law and was punished for his crimes and you use this as justification as being OK to use waterboarding on American citizens? If it were OK, he wouldn't have been convicted. This furthers my point that American's have Constitutional protection against waterboarding. You didn't think about that did you. Obviously not.

Very sad indeed. But thanks for the laugh! I haven't laughed that hard all day.
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Old 06-09-2009, 10:20 AM
 
2,008 posts, read 5,231,250 times
Reputation: 1463
I jokingly called for waterboarding him in another thread. Murder is never justified, neither is torture. Lock up the bastard, throw away the key. The guy is a killer, plain and simple, he killed a man IN CHURCH. He's a scumbag.
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