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Old 11-02-2013, 10:55 AM
 
Location: La lune et les étoiles
17,614 posts, read 19,052,082 times
Reputation: 18920

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Californian34 View Post
I get what you're saying Cali, but you should let others define themselves. If others don't want the title black, I am fine with it. we have our own culture/history here in the US. why cheapen it by including people who were not a part of it? when they come here they are right not to identify with us. we are real generational Americans. they are immigrants.
True. This is not about "claiming" them as African Americans or as Black Americans. I do not see them as African Americans or as Black Americans. We are culturally different people. But they are visibly "black" people that can not (in my opinion) be distinguished from other black people solely based upon their looks.

It is silly for someone who is 5 shades darker than myself with visible African features to expect people to simply ignore what we see with our own eyes just because they were born on the Isle of Denial.

 
Old 11-02-2013, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Suffolk, Va
3,029 posts, read 2,117,779 times
Reputation: 1961
Quote:
Originally Posted by calipoppy View Post
The Dominicans "struggle" with blackness goes beyond how they are classified by Americans. In reality, the DR (as most of the nations of the Caribbean) is a 3rd world country inhabited by people who are ashamed of their own ancestry and are bound to the colonial hierarchy of superiority.

Artists, Educators Aim To Transform Thinking, Laud Black Heritage In Color-Obsessed Dominican Republic

There's No Racism Here? A Black Woman in the Dominican Republic | AfricanAmerica.org
I'm not sure if recognizing their "blackness" would really change anything. And as an American, I don't really care. I care about poor people and struggling people in the rest of the world, but not because of their race. I would say, though, things are not so dire for Dominicans in comparison to people in the Congo or in Afghanistan. Or in Haiti for that matter.
 
Old 11-02-2013, 11:04 AM
 
6,436 posts, read 9,963,145 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Californian34 View Post
interesting, but if we were labeled by our nationality would you be American or Haitian?
I am an American. I only emphasized that I am descended from Haitian immigrants because the Dominican Republic is connected to Haiti so I am much more familiar with this particular topic than most African-Americans. And I don't care about it. That's what I came to say. African-Americans seem obsessed with classifying everyone as black. Like really, who cares.
 
Old 11-02-2013, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Suffolk, Va
3,029 posts, read 2,117,779 times
Reputation: 1961
Quote:
Originally Posted by allenk893 View Post
I am an American. I only emphasized that I am descended from Haitian immigrants because the Dominican Republic is connected to Haiti so I am much more familiar with this particular topic than most African-Americans. And I don't care about it. That's what I came to say. African-Americans seem obsessed with classifying everyone as black. Like really, who cares.
I hope you don't mind if I use you as an example. a little O/T, folks, this poster is an example of why "hyphenated Americans" exist. he considers himself black and an American, but he is not a black American, because he does not have southern roots born out of the slave trade or a history, in general, of ancestors living in this country. he is not part of the black American culture. therefore it would make a lot more sense for him to call himself Haitian-American. in cases like this it absolutely makes sense. but he is free to call himself whatever he likes. I'm just saying if we're going for accuracy, Haitian-American makes sense.
 
Old 11-02-2013, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Caribbean
7,577 posts, read 2,440,243 times
Reputation: 2743
Quote:
Originally Posted by Californian34 View Post
I get what you're saying Cali, but you should let others define themselves. If others don't want the title black, I am fine with it. we have our own culture/history here in the US. why cheapen it by including people who were not a part of it? when they come here they are right not to identify with us. we are real generational Americans. they are immigrants.
Exactly. To me, it is important to ensure understanding and appreciation of African heritage, just as all the others. People do not have label themselves "black." It is the acceptance of dark skin being just as beautiful as light, kinky hair just as beautiful as straight etc. that makes the difference.
 
Old 11-02-2013, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Suffolk, Va
3,029 posts, read 2,117,779 times
Reputation: 1961
Quote:
Originally Posted by caribdoll View Post
Exactly. To me, it is important to ensure understanding and appreciation of African heritage, just as all the others. People do not have label themselves "black." It is the acceptance of dark skin being just as beautiful as light, kinky hair just as beautiful as straight etc. that makes the difference.
I don't even care f they appreciate their skin or hair or African ancestry. they can go around looking simple like Sammy "the vampire" Sosa for all I care. it's pitiful, but it's his choice. I wish black American women would stop wearing ridiculous weaves and actresses would stop lightening their skin in photo shoots, but it's their choice.
 
Old 11-02-2013, 12:05 PM
 
Location: La lune et les étoiles
17,614 posts, read 19,052,082 times
Reputation: 18920
Quote:
Originally Posted by caribdoll View Post
Exactly. To me, it is important to ensure understanding and appreciation of African heritage, just as all the others. People do not have label themselves "black." It is the acceptance of dark skin being just as beautiful as light, kinky hair just as beautiful as straight etc. that makes the difference.
Sammy Sosa who personified the Dominican self hatred issue. The acceptance of dark skin and kinky hair IS the acknowledgement and acceptance of "blackness" (aka African heritage).



 
Old 11-02-2013, 12:11 PM
 
6,436 posts, read 9,963,145 times
Reputation: 8005
I thought Sammy Sosa was Cuban. Not that it matters.
 
Old 11-02-2013, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Maryland
18,624 posts, read 16,440,557 times
Reputation: 6348
Quote:
Originally Posted by Californian34 View Post
I hope you don't mind if I use you as an example. a little O/T, folks, this poster is an example of why "hyphenated Americans" exist. he considers himself black and an American, but he is not a black American, because he does not have southern roots born out of the slave trade or a history, in general, of ancestors living in this country. he is not part of the black American culture. therefore it would make a lot more sense for him to call himself Haitian-American. in cases like this it absolutely makes sense. but he is free to call himself whatever he likes. I'm just saying if we're going for accuracy, Haitian-American makes sense.
Agreed although I generally refer to myself as Black American if pushed I'll say Ghanaian American. I know exactly which particular country my ancestors come from no sense claiming all of Africa.
 
Old 11-02-2013, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Maryland
18,624 posts, read 16,440,557 times
Reputation: 6348
Quote:
Originally Posted by calipoppy View Post
Sammy Sosa who personified the Dominican self hatred issue. The acceptance of dark skin and kinky hair IS the acknowledgement and acceptance of "blackness" (aka African heritage).


His issues go beyond racial identification. A male Jamaican reggae star came under fire for doing the same thing.

His reasoning:

Quote:
“This is my new image,” Kartel said in the interview. “You can expect the unexpected. I feel comfortable with black people lightening their skin. They want a different look. It’s tantamount to white people getting a sun tan.”

Kartell is endorsing his own brand of cake soap and claims that the soap lightens his skin. However, Bounty Killer countered by saying that his mother has used cake soap and it has yet to bleach her skin. Bounty Killer believes that Kartel is using something stronger to lighten his skin.


Read more: Necole Bitchie.com: Dancehall Artist Vybz Kartel Compares Skin Bleaching To Tanning http://necolebitchie.com/2011/01/19/...#ixzz2jVu7hZGh
Read more at http://necolebitchie.com/2011/01/19/...lIOo2uKutLb.99
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