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Old 11-02-2013, 05:25 PM
 
Location: Suffolk, Va
3,029 posts, read 2,110,112 times
Reputation: 1961

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucario View Post
The concept of blackness is not limited to the United States. My Cuban relatives embrace their blackness while knowing they are not African American.
I don't think I meant blackness in reference to hair texture, skin tones, features, etc. that suggest west African origin. I have no doubt that there are those from Latin countries who do embrace these features and love the skin they are in. I think here I was talking about being a generational black American of southern roots.

 
Old 11-02-2013, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Suffolk, Va
3,029 posts, read 2,110,112 times
Reputation: 1961
Quote:
Originally Posted by calipoppy View Post
More Dominicans would go the Sammy Sosa skin bleaching route....if they could afford to do so. And Dominican women are renowned for their Dominican blowouts and hair straightening skills because wearing kinky hair is so taboo in the DR. I also know many Latina and Caribbean women who religiously wear hair clip-ins, hair weaves and chemically straighten their hair.

In the US, there is a very strong natural hair movement amongst African American women who have abandoned hair relaxers and other hair styling options that do not celebrate our natural hair texture (which is considered completely unacceptable in the DR and other Latin countries).
oh yes. I have been natural since 2009 and I have no intention of going back. one of the only good things about the east coast are all the people who are natural and the availability of products and stylists. I've heard stories about black American women going to the DR with natural hair and being pestered about why they don't straighten their hair. I was reading a blog not too long ago by a girl who studied there for awhile. they kept pestering her about her hair and they told her she shouldn't call herself black because it was nasty and associated with Haitians.
 
Old 11-02-2013, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Maryland
18,614 posts, read 16,381,997 times
Reputation: 6343
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucario View Post
Indeed, my issue with Dominicans is not that they identify as mixed. It's that they consider anything white or European superior and anything black or African inferior. And since Africa and that which is African is a strong part of their heritage, I consider that colonized and self-hating behavior.
Where on Earth could they ever get that idea from?
 
Old 11-02-2013, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Maryland
18,614 posts, read 16,381,997 times
Reputation: 6343
Quote:
Originally Posted by kovert View Post
You should see how many Dominicans salons have corned the hair straightening market in the nubian olmec precincts.

The pot truly is talking smack about the kettle.
Yup Black American women flock to these salons here in PG County. Domincans for hair straightening; Senegalese for hair braiding.
 
Old 11-02-2013, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Suffolk, Va
3,029 posts, read 2,110,112 times
Reputation: 1961
Quote:
Originally Posted by caribdoll View Post
So then similar issues exist among all of the groups above. Skin bleaching is all over the place, even in the poorest nations. It is not necessarily expensive to access such products. No one said that Hispanic or Caribbean women don't wear false hair or straighten either, but you seem to only want to point such issues out when it comes to Dominicans. Not because AAs are abandoning hair relaxers more recently does not automatically make them more conscious.
honestly, I kind of think it does. I went natural because I never wanted my little girl to feel that the natural hair she was born with was not good enough. but after seeing "good hair" and learning about how poisonous the chemicals I had been putting on my scalp for nearly 20 years are, I could never go back to the creamy crack. I think that's the number one reason many black women have went natural. people speculate that it is just a fad, but I argue that first came the natural movement and then came the amazing styles. most women won't go back to putting carcinogenic substances in their hair. Where I live I only see a few middle class and up black women with relaxed hair. most of the people I see with relaxed hair are working class or poor. they're always the last to know when something is dangerous.
 
Old 11-02-2013, 05:44 PM
 
Location: Suffolk, Va
3,029 posts, read 2,110,112 times
Reputation: 1961
Quote:
Originally Posted by EdwardA View Post
Where on Earth could they ever get that idea from?
you're from Africa, why don't you tell us?
 
Old 11-02-2013, 05:50 PM
 
Location: La lune et les étoiles
17,611 posts, read 18,978,481 times
Reputation: 18918
Quote:
Originally Posted by Californian34 View Post
oh yes. I have been natural since 2009 and I have no intention of going back. one of the only good things about the east coast are all the people who are natural and the availability of products and stylists. I've heard stories about black American women going to the DR with natural hair and being pestered about why they don't straighten their hair. I was reading a blog not too long ago by a girl who studied there for awhile. they kept pestering her about her hair and they told her she shouldn't call herself black because it was nasty and associated with Haitians.
Yep, I have also been au naturel since 2008-9 only straightening about twice a year for length check/trimming. The natural hair movement is also growing strong on the west coast, too.

The blog you referred to sounds similar to the essay from writer Kiini Ibura Salaam who wrote about her experiences studying abroad in the DR.

There is No Racism Here
 
Old 11-02-2013, 06:02 PM
 
Location: La lune et les étoiles
17,611 posts, read 18,978,481 times
Reputation: 18918
Quote:
Originally Posted by Californian34 View Post
honestly, I kind of think it does. I went natural because I never wanted my little girl to feel that the natural hair she was born with was not good enough. but after seeing "good hair" and learning about how poisonous the chemicals I had been putting on my scalp for nearly 20 years are, I could never go back to the creamy crack. I think that's the number one reason many black women have went natural. people speculate that it is just a fad, but I argue that first came the natural movement and then came the amazing styles. most women won't go back to putting carcinogenic substances in their hair. Where I live I only see a few middle class and up black women with relaxed hair. most of the people I see with relaxed hair are working class or poor. they're always the last to know when something is dangerous.
The natural hair movement definitely gained speed after "Good Hair" was released but started several years prior to the film. I remember watching that film and being annoyed that Chris Rock did not portray a balanced perspective to include many natural hair movement gurus that were on the scene at that time.

The natural hair movement is great on so many different fronts. Maintaining natural hair is far less expensive and (in my opinion) produces greater results including healthier, longer and stronger hair. I agree that the hold-outs tend to be the lower class and the least educated when it comes to letting go of chemically straightening hair.
 
Old 11-02-2013, 06:57 PM
 
2,241 posts, read 2,662,778 times
Reputation: 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by kovert View Post
you should see how many dominicans salons have corned the hair straightening market in the nubian olmec precincts.

The pot truly is talking smack about the kettle.
lmaoooooo #dead

+1
 
Old 11-02-2013, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Center of the universe
24,757 posts, read 33,863,841 times
Reputation: 11780
Quote:
Originally Posted by caribdoll View Post
Perhaps, but even so, the emphasis on them by some is a bit much. The strength of such issues can be seen in different areas. So many of us in the diaspora could use a dose of true appreciation of our African heritage.

For example, screaming one is "black" from the hilltops but running after any and everyone with light to white skin or ttachment to wigs/weaves/relaxers etc, which can be seen among AAs is no different. It is all a part of it, just like color and hair issues among Dominicans.
Not sure these are equivalent, and not sure this is prevalent among AAs.
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