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Old 11-02-2013, 10:11 PM
 
Location: Caribbean
7,577 posts, read 2,440,243 times
Reputation: 2743

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Quote:
Originally Posted by calipoppy View Post
Technically, Don Cheadle (who has 19% European ancestry per DNA admixture test) is "mulatto" however it would be silly for him to walk around saying, "I'm not black, I'm mulatto". And the word "mulatto" (mule = offspring of a donkey and a horse) is far more offensive than "negro" (which simply means "black").
That is certainly one perspective that may be valid in certain locations and not as much in others. The DR population is very mixed with the majority reflecting both heritages most visibly though and the culture as well. This is not to say that dark skin/African heritage/the term negro is not seen as lesser than by many (not to mention the complicated history with Haiti). However, simply that the fact that people would rather consider themselves as mixed/mulatto is not necessarily incorrect or an automatic indication of a denial of heritage.

Both negro & mulatto are originally problematic as terms of identification. Were you able to read the article?

 
Old 11-02-2013, 10:38 PM
 
Location: La lune et les étoiles
17,614 posts, read 19,052,082 times
Reputation: 18928
Quote:
Originally Posted by caribdoll View Post
That is certainly one perspective that may be valid in certain locations and not as much in others. The DR population is very mixed with the majority reflecting both heritages most visibly though and the culture as well. This is not to say that dark skin/African heritage/the term negro is not seen as lesser than by many (not to mention the complicated history with Haiti). However, simply that the fact that people would rather consider themselves as mixed/mulatto is not necessarily incorrect or an automatic indication of a denial of heritage.

Both negro & mulatto are originally problematic as terms of identification. Were you able to read the article?
The African American population is about as "mixed" as the population of the DR. The vast majority of African Americans could also refer to themselves "mixed" however we tend to limit that label to those who have parents from two different racial backgrounds.

I read the article (via google translate) and I think that it misses the mark. "Black" does not mean the denial of humanity to anyone except for those who do not have the strength to own what they are by ancestry. Its obvious that the "movimiento" feels that "blackness" is a burden to be shed. I am almost inclined to believe that "black" is the equivalent to the N-word for some in Latin America (specifically Dominicans)

Last edited by calipoppy; 11-02-2013 at 10:50 PM..
 
Old 11-02-2013, 10:53 PM
 
Location: Caribbean
7,577 posts, read 2,440,243 times
Reputation: 2743
Quote:
Originally Posted by calipoppy View Post
The African American population is about as "mixed" as the population of the DR. The vast majority of African Americans could also refer to themselves "mixed" however we tend to limit that label to those who have parents from two different racial backgrounds.
My view as to the degree of mixed heritage in both groups differs. However, that's absolutely fine if AAs prefer to identify in that manner. Just as it is fine for Dominicans to largely consider themselves mixed.
 
Old 11-02-2013, 10:59 PM
 
Location: Caribbean
7,577 posts, read 2,440,243 times
Reputation: 2743
Quote:
Originally Posted by calipoppy View Post
]
I read the article (via google translate) and I think that it misses the mark. "Black" does not mean the denial of humanity to anyone except for those who do not have the strength to own what they are by ancestry. Its obvious that the "movimiento" feels that "blackness" is a burden to be shed. I am almost inclined to believe that "black" is the equivalent to the N-word for some in Latin America (specifically Dominicans)
I believe it is far more on point than not. The article emphasizes African heritage rather than an association with a color. It is true that the term did come about in ignorance toward the many ethnic/cultural groups of African peoples brought over to the Americas. The identity was invented by Europeans, born out of the denial of ancestry/culture and not the other way around.

ETA: Regardless, it trumps the claim that choosing not to use the term "black" means that one is denying African heritage.
 
Old 11-02-2013, 11:53 PM
 
2,241 posts, read 2,676,196 times
Reputation: 424
Quote:
Originally Posted by caribdoll View Post
My point is that making progress in one regard doesn't make you overall more conscious than any and everyone else. More people are going natural but even a significant amount of them don't necessarily feel comfortable wearing their hair in the natural state. A number of others, such as Dominicans, wear their hair the same way. No relaxer but always straight. And anyway, hair is just one aspect of the matter...

But I'm happy to see among any group...and hopefully, it will become more prevalent in the DR and other places as well. Agree with you about it not being a fad and hopefully, it will reach the working class/poor in greater numbers soon.
DR is already having a big resurgence in a natural hair movement. There are many more people with each generation in DR wearing hair out more curly or natural.

I still don't get why Dominicans get flack overall when so many of these issues exist in the total African diaspora.

In addition Dominicans are a nationality and it would be better for others to compare them to U.S. Americans and vice versa. African Americans are an ethnic group in the USA. U.S. Americans of all races have just as many issues as Dominicans of all races and vice versa.
 
Old 11-02-2013, 11:56 PM
 
2,241 posts, read 2,676,196 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Californian34 View Post
when you say "a certain appearance" are you speaking of light skin black women? aren't they still black? but I can name numerous black American athletes who are not with light skin women like LeBron James and Dwayne Wade.
Dwayne Wade talks about Gabrielle Union being his beautiful black nubian queen, yet she has all of that stiched in European, Asian, Indian or straight horse hair stitched into her head. Contradiction knows no bounds.
 
Old 11-03-2013, 12:07 AM
 
2,241 posts, read 2,676,196 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Californian34 View Post
but it illustrates yet another great feat of black americans. we were able to shake the poison our masters drilled into our heads a lot sooner than so many others. we can be blue black, brown skin, light bright, red bone and still say, "I am a black person." praise God.
LOL! Really? Your statement is a contradiction because no one would refer to others as "masters" if they were truly liberated or freed.
 
Old 11-03-2013, 05:16 AM
 
Location: Center of the universe
24,757 posts, read 33,982,568 times
Reputation: 11780
Quote:
Originally Posted by MelismaticEchoes View Post
LOL! Really? Your statement is a contradiction because no one would refer to others as "masters" if they were truly liberated or freed.
She spoke in the past tense. In the past there were slavemasters.
 
Old 11-03-2013, 06:53 AM
 
20,611 posts, read 13,017,154 times
Reputation: 5905
Quote:
Originally Posted by Californian34 View Post
nope. my husband is light, but I certainly do not prefer light skin. I prefer handsome men. I see the color struck types that carib talks about. they all come across as corny, uneducated, and coonish. like lil wayne.
"Coonish"? Easy there; that IS a racist word if used against a Black person. Sheesh!
 
Old 11-03-2013, 08:17 AM
 
Location: La lune et les étoiles
17,614 posts, read 19,052,082 times
Reputation: 18928
Quote:
Originally Posted by MelismaticEchoes View Post
Dwayne Wade talks about Gabrielle Union being his beautiful black nubian queen, yet she has all of that stiched in European, Asian, Indian or straight horse hair stitched into her head. Contradiction knows no bounds.
Gabrielle Union and MANY other actresses/models (including MANY Caucasians and Latinas...see Britney Spears and Kim Kardashian) use hair extensions/weaves/hair pieces while working to reduce the damage to their own hair from the constant handling by stylists and onset lighting.

Gabrielle Union's own hair is also very lovely....

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