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Old 03-07-2015, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Austin
29,518 posts, read 16,420,293 times
Reputation: 8061

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sanspeur View Post
Oh really....In what fantasy world did you find this information?

Sandy is not the only recent storm to make people ask questions about climate change and weather. In 2010, an epic winter storm dubbed “Snowmageddon” dumped more than half a meter (2 feet) of snow across many parts of the U.S. East Coast. And in April 2011, tornadoes killed more than 364 Americans—the most ever in a month. The rash of twisters etched scars of destruction on the landscape so long and wide that they could be seen from space. The United States set records in 2011 and 2012 for the number of weather disasters that exceeded $1 billion in losses; most were storms.
In a Warming World, the Storms May Be Fewer But Stronger : Feature Articles
Measuring storms by dollar damage is not only silly, it's juvenile.

Are you aware that a hurricane going through Florida 10,000 years ago would have done no damage in terms of dollars?

 
Old 03-07-2015, 12:08 PM
 
2,778 posts, read 1,420,535 times
Reputation: 2418
Quote:
Originally Posted by lookb4youcross View Post
Still on this topic....I see the usual mudslinging from the cultists towards people that don't buy their lies. You global warmers/climate change cultists have a real bad track record, mostly for lying, and what you say will happen never materializes.
Yes, why is it that the lying, mudslinging, delusional cultists with a bad track record are always so mean while respectful gentlemen such as yourself make charitable, high-minded statements like the one above?

Good for you for taking the high road every time.
 
Old 03-07-2015, 12:25 PM
 
4,998 posts, read 1,989,352 times
Reputation: 2247
Quote:
Originally Posted by sanspeur View Post
Oh really....In what fantasy world did you find this information?

Sandy is not the only recent storm to make people ask questions about climate change and weather. In 2010, an epic winter storm dubbed “Snowmageddon” dumped more than half a meter (2 feet) of snow across many parts of the U.S. East Coast. And in April 2011, tornadoes killed more than 364 Americans—the most ever in a month. The rash of twisters etched scars of destruction on the landscape so long and wide that they could be seen from space. The United States set records in 2011 and 2012 for the number of weather disasters that exceeded $1 billion in losses; most were storms.
In a Warming World, the Storms May Be Fewer But Stronger : Feature Articles

Climate activists are ruining the good name of NASA and science with their drivel.

The "Tri-State Tornado" of March 18, 1925 killed 695 Americans in a single day.
 
Old 03-07-2015, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Northridge/Porter Ranch, Calif.
22,362 posts, read 27,498,773 times
Reputation: 6533
Quote:
Originally Posted by sanspeur View Post
Oh really....In what fantasy world did you find this information?

Sandy is not the only recent storm to make people ask questions about climate change and weather. In 2010, an epic winter storm dubbed “Snowmageddon” dumped more than half a meter (2 feet) of snow across many parts of the U.S. East Coast. And in April 2011, tornadoes killed more than 364 Americans—the most ever in a month. The rash of twisters etched scars of destruction on the landscape so long and wide that they could be seen from space. The United States set records in 2011 and 2012 for the number of weather disasters that exceeded $1 billion in losses; most were storms.
In a Warming World, the Storms May Be Fewer But Stronger : Feature Articles
You can't go by the number of people killed. The population was a lot less in tornado-prone areas 100 years ago compared to today. Can't compare costs, either, because of inflation.
 
Old 03-07-2015, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Austin
29,518 posts, read 16,420,293 times
Reputation: 8061
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultor View Post
Climate activists are ruining the good name of NASA and science with their drivel.

The "Tri-State Tornado" of March 18, 1925 killed 695 Americans in a single day.
And this;

The Hurricane of 1900 made landfall on September 8, 1900, in the city of Galveston, Texas, in the United States.[1] It had estimated winds of 145 miles per hour (233 km/h) at landfall, making it a Category 4 storm on the Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Scale. It was the deadliest hurricane in US history, and the second costliest hurricane in U.S. history based on the dollar's 2005 value (to compare costs with those of Hurricane Katrina and others).
...
The Galveston Hurricane of 1900 is the deadliest natural disaster ever to strike the United States. By contrast, the second-deadliest storm to strike the United States, the 1928 Okeechobee hurricane, caused more than 2,500 deaths, and the deadliest storm of recent times, Hurricane Katrina, claimed the lives of approximately 1,800 people.

1900 Galveston hurricane - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Old 03-07-2015, 12:44 PM
 
3,792 posts, read 1,882,686 times
Reputation: 767
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultor View Post
Climate activists are ruining the good name of NASA and science with their drivel.

The "Tri-State Tornado" of March 18, 1925 killed 695 Americans in a single day.
And if you do something like say that AGW is a good thing because it will prevent the coming ice age then they get really wound up.
 
Old 03-07-2015, 01:15 PM
 
Location: Victoria, BC.
30,827 posts, read 31,662,549 times
Reputation: 12563
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadking2003 View Post
And this;

The Hurricane of 1900 made landfall on September 8, 1900, in the city of Galveston, Texas, in the United States.[1] It had estimated winds of 145 miles per hour (233 km/h) at landfall, making it a Category 4 storm on the Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Scale. It was the deadliest hurricane in US history, and the second costliest hurricane in U.S. history based on the dollar's 2005 value (to compare costs with those of Hurricane Katrina and others).
...
The Galveston Hurricane of 1900 is the deadliest natural disaster ever to strike the United States. By contrast, the second-deadliest storm to strike the United States, the 1928 Okeechobee hurricane, caused more than 2,500 deaths, and the deadliest storm of recent times, Hurricane Katrina, claimed the lives of approximately 1,800 people.

1900 Galveston hurricane - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
You are grasping at straws.......In 1900, communication was very limited, hurricane forecasts didn't exist, neither did evacuation notices. Warnings, if there were any would be too late....You cannot compare the horse and buggy days to modern times....

  • Roughly twice as many hurricanes are now reported in the Atlantic compared to a century ago. The rise, identified by Greg Holland (NCAR), occurred over three distinct periods associated with rises in sea-surface temperature (see NCAR news release).
  • In both the North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans, the duration of tropical cyclones as well as their strongest wind speeds have both increased by about 50% over the past 50 years, according to Kerry Emanuel, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (see MIT news release).
  • The number of Category 4 and 5 hurricanes worldwide nearly doubled from the early 1970s to the early 2000s, found a team from the Georgia Institute of Technology and NCAR (see NCAR news release).
https://www2.ucar.edu/news/backgroun...hoons-cyclones
 
Old 03-07-2015, 01:21 PM
 
2,778 posts, read 1,420,535 times
Reputation: 2418
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultor View Post
Climate activists are ruining the good name of NASA and science with their drivel.

The "Tri-State Tornado" of March 18, 1925 killed 695 Americans in a single day.
Tornado warning systems weren't accurate until 1948, and have improved a lot since then.
 
Old 03-07-2015, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Victoria, BC.
30,827 posts, read 31,662,549 times
Reputation: 12563
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ultor
Climate activists are ruining the good name of NASA and science with their drivel.
Actually climate activists, unlike deniers, rely on NASA and science for our "drivel"...Deniers rely on propaganda, or their own uneducated opinions....
 
Old 03-07-2015, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Victoria, BC.
30,827 posts, read 31,662,549 times
Reputation: 12563
Here is a bit of basic science for you....

How global warming fuels hurricanes.

Hurricanes feed off warm ocean water. In the ocean's hurricane nurseries, heat rising from the ocean turns into water vapor. As the vapor rises and cools, it condenses into rain. This releases heat, which helps strengthen circulating tropical cyclones. Warmer oceans mean more water vapor, and more intense storms. http://www.livescience.com/38017-hur...-stronger.html

This is undeniable, as heat is energy.
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