U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Politics and Other Controversies
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-09-2010, 04:27 PM
 
34,990 posts, read 34,677,734 times
Reputation: 6163

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Austin13 View Post
DNA evidence is NOT INVOLVED IN ALL CAPITAL CASES! You are absolutely, completely and totally wrong in your second sentence.
Wu -? Sure it is
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-09-2010, 06:08 PM
 
Location: between Ath,GR & Mia,FL...
2,574 posts, read 1,984,268 times
Reputation: 327
I don't like concealed criminal loving...

If someone is against the capital penalty in principle,he should just state that & not elaborate on technicalities,or the alleged cost,another crazy "argument"...
It is logically impossible 1 syringe with poison to cost more than...40 years in a prison...Absolutely impossible...

The current procces in USA is so scrutinized that there are no wrongful convictions...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-09-2010, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Land of debt and Corruption
7,526 posts, read 7,194,115 times
Reputation: 2845
Quote:
Originally Posted by harrymiafl View Post
I don't like concealed criminal loving...

If someone is against the capital penalty in principle,he should just state that & not elaborate on technicalities,or the alleged cost,another crazy "argument"...
It is logically impossible 1 syringe with poison to cost more than...40 years in a prison...Absolutely impossible...

The current procces in USA is so scrutinized that there are no wrongful convictions...
Honestly, the appeals process is extremely costly to the taxpayer. Because of the severity of the punishment (death) these inmates are given a lot of latitude to appeal their convictions until they run out of appeals. That's why it takes literally years to put someone to death after sentencing. I didn't believe it either until I actually investigated it myself several years back. Here's a link. To execute or not: A question of cost? - Crime & courts- msnbc.com There are many others, but it's sometimes hard to find unbiased ones that don't have an anti-death penalty agenda.

I am in NO way a concealed criminal lover, and if it weren't for the cost/time factor, I would be 100000% pro-death penalty. As it stands, I'm pretty close to 100% anyways. I would rather these criminals be put to death than be released to commit more crimes. It isn't about punishment or using the death penalty as a deterrence IMO. It's about protecting society from sociopaths. Nothing but death can assure that the criminals won't be released at some point in the future to re-offend. Unfortunately, nobody can guarantee that a sentence won't be commuted due to space constraints at the prison or whatever.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-09-2010, 08:19 PM
 
63 posts, read 29,019 times
Reputation: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZGACK View Post
Of course not. But I don't think the exceedingly remote possibility you envision warrants halting all executions. There are plenty of murderers on death row where there is no doubt at all as to their guilt. Would you stay their execution because some other convicted murderer may have been wrongfully convicted? Because that is what your position equates to.
Good! but if you are not "OK" with just one person being killed in error, it would seem logical to stop the whole process until there's a "fix", or do we continue to execute knowing that we could make other mistakes?

Dont get me wrong, i too, am conflicted with the death penalty.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-09-2010, 09:30 PM
 
3,854 posts, read 3,733,981 times
Reputation: 557
Quote:
Originally Posted by delusianne View Post
Wu -? Sure it is
Not every capital case has DNA evidence. I can think of one case just off the top of my head where a police officer was shot and killed by someone (shooting from a distance) and there was NO DNA evidence in that case. Those CSI shows on TV are pretty far-fetched when it comes to available technology. That stuff on TV is largely fantasy.

Last edited by Austin13; 01-09-2010 at 09:41 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-09-2010, 09:32 PM
 
8,640 posts, read 7,956,277 times
Reputation: 2854
I am for the death penalty if the evidence is overwhelming.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-09-2010, 09:33 PM
 
3,854 posts, read 3,733,981 times
Reputation: 557
Quote:
Originally Posted by whatyousay View Post
Honestly, the appeals process is extremely costly to the taxpayer. Because of the severity of the punishment (death) these inmates are given a lot of latitude to appeal their convictions until they run out of appeals. That's why it takes literally years to put someone to death after sentencing. I didn't believe it either until I actually investigated it myself several years back. Here's a link. To execute or not: A question of cost? - Crime & courts- msnbc.com There are many others, but it's sometimes hard to find unbiased ones that don't have an anti-death penalty agenda.

I am in NO way a concealed criminal lover, and if it weren't for the cost/time factor, I would be 100000% pro-death penalty. As it stands, I'm pretty close to 100% anyways. I would rather these criminals be put to death than be released to commit more crimes. It isn't about punishment or using the death penalty as a deterrence IMO. It's about protecting society from sociopaths. Nothing but death can assure that the criminals won't be released at some point in the future to re-offend. Unfortunately, nobody can guarantee that a sentence won't be commuted due to space constraints at the prison or whatever.
Ever heard of LIFE WITHOUT PAROLE .....ever? Pleeeezzzz. Right. Some governor is going to allow the Department of Corrections to release someone convicted of capital murder, who has been given a sentence of LIFE WITHOUT PAROLE ever, because of space constraints.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-09-2010, 09:37 PM
 
3,854 posts, read 3,733,981 times
Reputation: 557
Quote:
Originally Posted by harrymiafl View Post
I don't like concealed criminal loving...

If someone is against the capital penalty in principle,he should just state that & not elaborate on technicalities,or the alleged cost,another crazy "argument"...
It is logically impossible 1 syringe with poison to cost more than...40 years in a prison...Absolutely impossible...

The current procces in USA is so scrutinized that there are no wrongful convictions...
You believe what you believe because you have apparently never done any real research on the subject, and so you just close your mind to anything that might be negative to your dearly held opinion/belief.

You're absolutely WRONG about the cost of executing someone being less expensive than a life sentence. This is the USA and we do have a Constitution and lots of people seem to think it's important to adhere to that Constitution as well as follow the law........which includes due process for EVERYONE.

If there are no wrongful convictions then why are people released from death rows in this country BECAUSE OF A WRONGFUL CONVICTION?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-09-2010, 10:13 PM
 
3,854 posts, read 3,733,981 times
Reputation: 557
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZGACK View Post
No. I'm saying your statement that nothing is 100% certain when someone is sentenced to death is wrong. (See. I posted the quotes for you to see just to make it easy on you). You choose to see doubt, reasonable or imagined, in all death penalty cases because you oppose the death penalty. That is your right. That being the case, however, does not give you the right to claim any and all death sentences are therefore suspect and should not be carried out. Some crimes are so heinous and the perpetrators so evil they forfeit any claim to life and deserve the death penalty.
Cameron Todd Willingham, Texas, and the death penalty : The New Yorker

I would be willing to bet that you would have been first in line to declare that Cameron Todd Willingham was one of those "perpetrators so evil".....and looked what has happened in that case years later.

Read the ENTIRE article carefully. Remember the name. This happened in Texas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-09-2010, 10:18 PM
 
Location: Hoboken
19,891 posts, read 16,279,761 times
Reputation: 3123
The innocence project has freed 249 innocent people some who were on death row. I am sure they have not identified every single innocent person. I am sure innocent people have been executed and more will be.

The Innocence Project - Home
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Politics and Other Controversies
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top