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Old 01-29-2010, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Austin
1,477 posts, read 1,360,599 times
Reputation: 435

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Quote:
Eating all your vegetables was a lot better for you in the '50s. Store-bought veggies weren't as pretty back then, but according to USDA data, they were packed with a lot more nutrients than their modern counterparts. The likely reason for the nutritional drop is that hybrid crops are often bred for size and color, not nutrients. Click through the slideshow for the stats for a few crops that have gone to seed.
Source: Looks Great, Less Filling | Mother Jones

Just an illusion.
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Old 01-29-2010, 09:59 AM
 
16,745 posts, read 18,954,085 times
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That's very interesting and good to know... I'll never look at vegetables the same way again...

Last edited by gallowsCalibrator; 01-29-2010 at 12:43 PM.. Reason: Personal attacks are not necessary.
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Old 01-29-2010, 11:05 AM
 
Location: TX
1,098 posts, read 1,542,233 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joejitsu View Post
I've heard this before too. If you do some research on hybridized/engineered commercial produce vs 'heirloom' varieties - it's a little ominous.
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Old 01-29-2010, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 69,987,095 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tyanger View Post
I've heard this before too. If you do some research on hybridized/engineered commercial produce vs 'heirloom' varieties - it's a little ominous.
What these big companies are striving for is uniformity in size so machines can harvest. They also look for "the right color" for consumers.

If you grow your own OP/heirloom veggies then you see that they are all shapes and sizes. A slight bruise or slit is no reason to throw it out either.

Many Americans are fooled by the supermarket looks...100% "perfect" sized veggies/fruits...and available in off season as well ?

Also, many are harvested before fully ripe and gas is used to ripen them on their voyage to YOUR supermarket. Gas vs sun for ripening ? Which do you think puts more nutrition in your food ?

PS..got a secret for ya...chicken eggs don't all look EXACTLY alike either ..not even the organic ones you see in the supermarket. You'd never know though unless you start buying direct from the farmer.

Nice to see eye opening articles like this showing up. Consumers really do need to know this but sadly the MSM will not be the ones to do it.
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Old 01-29-2010, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Land of debt and Corruption
7,526 posts, read 6,974,625 times
Reputation: 2841
I agree with the premise, but there are many factors not just the preponderance of genetically modified fruits and veggies. The fruits/vegetables gain their nutrients from the soil, and over time with conventional agricultural farming practices, the nutrients are not replaced and are subsequently depleted. Organically produced produce fairs much better nutrient-wise.
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Old 01-29-2010, 11:58 AM
 
Location: OCEAN BREEZES AND VIEWS SAN CLEMENTE
19,899 posts, read 15,312,404 times
Reputation: 6451
Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyTexan View Post
What these big companies are striving for is uniformity in size so machines can harvest. They also look for "the right color" for consumers.

If you grow your own OP/heirloom veggies then you see that they are all shapes and sizes. A slight bruise or slit is no reason to throw it out either.

Many Americans are fooled by the supermarket looks...100% "perfect" sized veggies/fruits...and available in off season as well ?

Also, many are harvested before fully ripe and gas is used to ripen them on their voyage to YOUR supermarket. Gas vs sun for ripening ? Which do you think puts more nutrition in your food ?

PS..got a secret for ya...chicken eggs don't all look EXACTLY alike either ..not even the organic ones you see in the supermarket. You'd never know though unless you start buying direct from the farmer.

Nice to see eye opening articles like this showing up. Consumers really do need to know this but sadly the MSM will not be the ones to do it.
I Agree most with you here. I have friends who work in SuperMarkets, and in Different States. Although so many fruits and veggies, look the part perfect in size and color. So many are harvested, before they are Fully ripe. Gas is used, I am glad you knew that. ! Gas cannot be better then the Sun.
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Old 01-29-2010, 12:27 PM
 
5,767 posts, read 10,040,015 times
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The commercial tomato industry is notorious for selecting for size, shape, and hardiness above all else. There is a long-running debate involving the FDA, commercial tomato growers, and other tomato growers about whether or not irregularly-shaped tomato varieties can legally be sold as "tomatoes" in stores.
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Old 01-29-2010, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 69,987,095 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tablemtn View Post
The commercial tomato industry is notorious for selecting for size, shape, and hardiness above all else. There is a long-running debate involving the FDA, commercial tomato growers, and other tomato growers about whether or not irregularly-shaped tomato varieties can legally be sold as "tomatoes" in stores.
Shop at a Farmer's market where Joe and Jane sell their "hobby farm" fruits and vegetables and take a look see at all the different shapes.

Also the taste is different..supermarket is bland compared to the real deal.
I try to get as much as possible either from my own garden, farmers markets or direct from a farmer (meat).
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Old 01-29-2010, 12:33 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,535 posts, read 29,290,525 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joejitsu View Post
Not only that, you cannot pump chemical fertilizers into the soil and expect that the produce grown will be as nutritious as those grown with natural, organic fertilizer. Farmers apply Nitrogen, Potassium and Magnesium to plants to make them grow, and they do. But what is missing is a myriad of micro nutrients, minerals and trace elements that are fully utilized by the plant and passed along to consumer.

Growing your own produce is the only answer. Also, using heirloom or open pollinated seeds is highly beneficial.

Thake that * Monsanto bestards!

20yrsinBranson
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Old 01-29-2010, 12:39 PM
 
24,001 posts, read 17,635,558 times
Reputation: 12854
here's the study this is supposedly based on-

Changes in USDA Food Composition Data for 43 Garden Crops, 1950 to 1999 -- Davis et al. 23 (6): 669 -- Journal of the American College of Nutrition
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