U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Oregon > Portland
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
Old 09-06-2010, 04:34 PM
 
Location: Cleveland Heights OH
13,375 posts, read 9,850,667 times
Reputation: 12741
Quote:
All other stores - the ma & pa stores, which are plentiful here - can use plastic bags.
That's good to here. I can tell my kitty she doesn't have to hold it in any longer.

Macy's here uses those paper bags with their name on it too but they also use plastic bags. As does Penny's, Sears etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-07-2010, 11:05 AM
 
5,567 posts, read 7,873,833 times
Reputation: 5576
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
That's good to here. I can tell my kitty she doesn't have to hold it in any longer.
Awww! Poor kitty!

Seriously, though, if it's pet waste that keeps people wanting to keep using and keep stores buying and giving away the plastic grocery bags, there are other alternatives.

If you buy the right kind of cat litter, for example, you can compost your cat's waste. (not clay, not the crystals, and not the scented kind... think natural products like corn, wheat, wood, paper... we use this and it works really good for our two indoor-only adult male cats who pee and poop a lot!) I wouldn't use that in my veggie garden, but you could use that compost for your flowers and other non-edible plants. In an apartment situation, where you might not have a yard or garage to do any composting in, you can plan to scoop your cats poo and pee directly into your regular trash. Sprinkle some baking soda over it if you're not planning on taking the trash out right away. That's part of our routine - before we take our trash out we always scoop the litter boxes. We do this once a day. We recycle more than we throw away, so our trash bag is actually rather small, so we take it out each night before we go to bed (usually after the dinner dishes are cleaned up). Some cat litter's claim you can flush it down the toilet, but I've heard that you're really not supposed to do that.

As for dogs, if you can't train your dog to only poop or pee in your own yard, where you can scoop it up and dispose of it right away without even using any plastic, you should just suck it up and buy the real doggy bags. I don't know why people expect grocery stores to keep providing dog owners free dog poop bags. If you own a pet you should be responsible for it, which includes dealing with your pets waste without relying on others to provide you the tools with which to do so.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-07-2010, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Cleveland Heights OH
13,375 posts, read 9,850,667 times
Reputation: 12741
Quote:
Originally Posted by haggardhouseelf View Post
Awww! Poor kitty!

Seriously, though, if it's pet waste that keeps people wanting to keep using and keep stores buying and giving away the plastic grocery bags, there are other alternatives.

If you buy the right kind of cat litter, for example, you can compost your cat's waste. (not clay, not the crystals, and not the scented kind... think natural products like corn, wheat, wood, paper... we use this and it works really good for our two indoor-only adult male cats who pee and poop a lot!) I wouldn't use that in my veggie garden, but you could use that compost for your flowers and other non-edible plants. In an apartment situation, where you might not have a yard or garage to do any composting in, you can plan to scoop your cats poo and pee directly into your regular trash. Sprinkle some baking soda over it if you're not planning on taking the trash out right away. That's part of our routine - before we take our trash out we always scoop the litter boxes. We do this once a day. We recycle more than we throw away, so our trash bag is actually rather small, so we take it out each night before we go to bed (usually after the dinner dishes are cleaned up). Some cat litter's claim you can flush it down the toilet, but I've heard that you're really not supposed to do that.

As for dogs, if you can't train your dog to only poop or pee in your own yard, where you can scoop it up and dispose of it right away without even using any plastic, you should just suck it up and buy the real doggy bags. I don't know why people expect grocery stores to keep providing dog owners free dog poop bags. If you own a pet you should be responsible for it, which includes dealing with your pets waste without relying on others to provide you the tools with which to do so.
Very good alternatives. I will see if my old kitty will agree to use a new type of litter. She once refused to use her litter box when I lined it with plastic. She probably got confused.

But it's not only for kitty poop. I mentioned a lot of different uses for these bags in an earlier post. The thing is, as I also mentioned, I think that this will not curtail the use of plastic bags. People will just go out and buy them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2010, 02:02 PM
 
5,567 posts, read 7,873,833 times
Reputation: 5576
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minervah View Post
Very good alternatives. I will see if my old kitty will agree to use a new type of litter. She once refused to use her litter box when I lined it with plastic. She probably got confused.

But it's not only for kitty poop. I mentioned a lot of different uses for these bags in an earlier post. The thing is, as I also mentioned, I think that this will not curtail the use of plastic bags. People will just go out and buy them.
Well at least they'll quit expecting free handouts. OK... maybe not! But I wonder, too, if when having to spend their own money on the plastic bags, perhaps they'll consider ways to use less or to be more resourceful?

Today I bought some new kitty litter called "feline pine". It's supposed to be even better than the World's Best Cat Litter that we have been using, and I also wanted to try it because it costs less, too. I've got two cats, so we have two litter boxes. In one I'm keeping the WBCL and in the other I'm introducing the feline pine. We'll see if they like the feline pine. If not, we'll stick with the WBCL. Either way, both litters are safe to compost, from what I've been told and read. Not for edible gardens, but for ornamental ones.

Good luck with your kitty, Minerva!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-09-2010, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Cleveland Heights OH
13,375 posts, read 9,850,667 times
Reputation: 12741
Quote:
I've got two cats, so we have two litter boxes. In one I'm keeping the WBCL and in the other I'm introducing the feline pine.
Good idea. I also have two litter boxes for when I had two kitties. Now I am down to one kitty but I use the two boxes by alternating them; while one is being washed, the other gets filled.

It's a good way to introduce a new litter. If I leave one box with the used litter out, even though it's scooped out and fill the other with fresh litter, guess which one she chooses to use? Fresh litter wins every time. Cats are smart.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-12-2010, 04:25 PM
 
79 posts, read 66,320 times
Reputation: 46
"If you buy the right kind of cat litter, for example, you can compost your cat's waste. (not clay, not the crystals, and not the scented kind... think natural products like corn, wheat, wood, paper... we use this and it works really good for our two indoor-only adult male cats who pee and poop a lot!) I wouldn't use that in my veggie garden, but you could use that compost for your flowers and other non-edible plants."

A company in Illinois (unsurprisingly) markets a product (Bed'o'Cob?) produced from recycled corn cobs, and it's surprisingly absorbent. Our caracal likes it, as she stays high and dry when peeing.

Generally, it's inadvisable to compost predator waste, although herbivore waste is excellent. If you have a domestic cat, you should be able to flush most of the litter leavings. Though when it's time for full-scale litter cleaning, you could compost the material - minus the fecals - together with kitchen waste and leaf debris.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-12-2010, 04:34 PM
 
79 posts, read 66,320 times
Reputation: 46
"But I wonder, too, if when having to spend their own money on the plastic bags, perhaps they'll consider ways to use less or to be more resourceful?"

Meh. Everybody pays for the bags, anyway, as they're figured into the cost of doing business. It's kind of ironic, though: plastic bags cost far less and are easier to store and ship than either paper or cloth counterparts. Moreover, since they are produced from a waste product of natural gas that would previously have been flared off (burned), they were initially touted by enviros as a great alternative to paper bags; saving countless trees from the axe while turning a waste product into a useful commodity.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-13-2010, 03:03 AM
 
Location: Ohio
9,823 posts, read 4,556,286 times
Reputation: 10894
I would be OK with them going back to paper bags IF......................they started to make them with HEMP......................NOT TREES.

I would just have to buy the little waste basket liners for the cat litter.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-13-2010, 03:27 AM
 
Location: Cleveland Heights OH
13,375 posts, read 9,850,667 times
Reputation: 12741
There are far worse threats to the environment than the plastic bags we get in the grocery stores. For instance: The Poop on Eco-Friendly Diapers

People will never give these up.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-13-2010, 08:33 AM
 
474 posts, read 739,582 times
Reputation: 253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annie53 View Post
I would be OK with them going back to paper bags IF......................they started to make them with HEMP......................NOT TREES.

I would just have to buy the little waste basket liners for the cat litter.
I think most of the paper bags are made from recycled paper now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Oregon > Portland

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:21 AM.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top