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Old 12-02-2010, 09:38 PM
 
132 posts, read 312,967 times
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We learned that it's Will-AM-it.
And Couch St. is "Cooch."
But is it GLEE-sun or GLIS-un? I've heard both from long-time Portlanders.
What other mysterious pronunciations will identify me as a newby?

And, most importantly, why does my GPS call "Morrison Br." "Morrison Brother"? This fills me with glee each time I drive over the "Morrison Brother" but why? Why? Why?
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Old 12-02-2010, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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I lived in the neighborhood and always pronounced it "Glee-son".

The GPS issue is probably the result of a programmer from another city working while short of sleep.
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Old 12-03-2010, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Just outside of Portland
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Also, Flavel is pronounced FLAH-vell and 39th Avenue is pronounced Cesar E Chavez.
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Old 12-03-2010, 11:54 AM
 
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If someone living in Portland calls GLEE-son, GIS-son, they're lying when they tell you they're a longtime Portlander. It doesn't take long to know how to pronounce that street's name.
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Old 12-03-2010, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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The only other important one is "OR-eh-gun". Hearing people say "or-eh-GON" really grates on our ears.

Here's a useful guide: A Northwest Pronunciation Guide

I just noticed that that site doesn't have "Clatskanie", which is "KLAT-skan-eye".
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Old 12-03-2010, 02:04 PM
 
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I know what you mean about hearing or-ee-GON, Rob Allen. But I must say it's gotten a lot better than it was 2-3 decades ago. More and more people are saying it correctly.
Now poor neh-VAD-a was continuously called neh-VAH-da during the recent election campaigns. Thanks for the link. I already noticed that I've been mispronouncing Pend Oreille all of these years.
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Old 12-03-2010, 02:33 PM
 
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Also out in the suburbs, Aloha is pronounced "uh-low-uh", not "ah-low-ha" like the Hawaiian greeting. Out on the Clackamas, Estacada is always "ess-tuh-cayda" not "ess-tah-cahda". And down off of I-5 to the south, the little town of Scio is pronounced "sigh-oh" not "skee-oh".

I once mis-pronounced Estacada on the college NPR news radio affiliate when I was a journalism student in college and got a tongue-lashing from our native Oregonian news director...Spanish and French language skills can mess you up if you try to pronounce all the place names in the West by their language of origin.
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Old 12-03-2010, 03:16 PM
 
132 posts, read 312,967 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deezus View Post
I once mis-pronounced Estacada on the college NPR news radio affiliate when I was a journalism student in college and got a tongue-lashing from our native Oregonian news director...Spanish and French language skills can mess you up if you try to pronounce all the place names in the West by their language of origin.
Ha!

Thanks, all. I'm finding these tidbits to be really useful. A longtime Portlander (and longtime friend of my husband's), who hitchhiked here from the east coast in the '70s, told us Glisan could be pronounced either way, although I've definitely heard it pronounced more frequently as "GLEE-sun." Not that I hear it mentioned all that much.

Thanks for the link, too.

The dialect of Porlandeese can be quite mystifying.
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Old 12-03-2010, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Just outside of Portland
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Here are some more Portlandisms.

Never preface a highway or interstate with "The". This will totally identify you as a californian.
It's not "take the 205 to ................", it's "take 205 to...........".
You are allowed to call 84 "The Banfield" though.

You go to the "coast" not "the beach" or "the shore".
Once you get to the coast, you go to the beach.
So it's not "We went to the beach for our vacation", it's "For our vacation, we spent some time on the coast and went to the beach".

Never ever call Mt. Hood "The Mountain" or just "Hood".
It's proper name is Mt. Hood. Always.

For long time Portlanders "The River" means the Columbia.
When you say I got to go across the river, that means you are going to Washington.
Which, by the way, is properly pronounced "Washinton". No "g".
You might think "The River" means the Willamette, but no.
If you are going to cross the Willamette (and stay local) you say "I'm going downtown" or say "I'm going to the West Side."
You don't mention the Willamette River.

It's TRImet with the emphasis on Tri, not triMET with the emphasis on Met.
The young newscasters and radio people that are fresh to Portland should get this straight.

And Bob Miller (KPAM) is the Portland king of morning AM radio. Period.
Not Paul Linneman (KEX).

This also. It bugs the hell out of me but I can't figure out if it's a local thing or not.
The words Sell and Sale are used strangely.
For example, people will say "I'm going to sale my car" instead of "I'm going to sell my car".
Then they tell me that the car is "up for sell".
And I have actually seen a "For Sell" sign or two.

Last edited by pdxMIKEpdx; 12-03-2010 at 06:53 PM..
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Old 12-03-2010, 06:48 PM
 
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pdxMIKEpdx, I agree with you on most of your post but I've never noticed people saying "Washinton". I've always called it Washington and so have most of the other Oregonians I grew up in Portland with. I did have a friend who moved up from San Diego refer to it as "War-shing-ton". I think it came from her parents' Midwestern roots. She used to go to the laundromat to do her "warsh".
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