U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Oregon > Portland
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-10-2011, 10:40 AM
 
Location: the Beaver State
6,476 posts, read 6,319,565 times
Reputation: 3297

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nell Plotts View Post
I understand that Portland needed to separate the storm & sewer systems but their 'solution' to storm water abatement is to force home owners to dig dry wells and pipe their down spouts to them.
From an ecological stand point that makes sense. It helps return water to the aquifers. At least in theory according to the Environmentalists.

It seems like many of the houses I looked at (when we were buying,) in Portland had this setup if there were pre-1965. After that, most of them had regular down spouts. Then these started showing up again in the early 2000 time frame, or were retrofitted to those post 1965 houses.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-10-2011, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
7,029 posts, read 7,905,387 times
Reputation: 3015
Actually most pre 1970's houses in Portland connected their downspouts to the sewer line.

Having dry wells for roof storm-water is great in theory but bad in practice for many sites. Few have much surge capacity and many silt up over the years. With infill there is less permeable surface to absorb storm water and the surfaces that are permeable become super saturated.

Storm water retention ponds were often required for developments, as well as green areas. What happens, a few years after the inspector has signed off is that these areas are filled in and have greatly reduced retention capacity.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-10-2011, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
3,809 posts, read 4,418,509 times
Reputation: 4135
I think what you mean is that there are Japanese records of a tsunami in 1700 that has been linked to the last Cascadia quake. It's true that a 100 foot tall tidal wave would wipe out almost all human habitation on the Oregon coast just like it did in Japan.

The comment about loss of life got me started thinking about the large variety of native language families on the Oregon coast.

Don Macnaughtan - Lane Community College Library - American Indian Languages of Western Oregon

Obviously the tsunami did not wipe out many tribes, though we may never know if some did not survive. The quake happened in January, when most bands would have moved away from the coast to upland winter camps.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2011, 11:37 PM
 
9 posts, read 12,022 times
Reputation: 15
I'm still pondering the whole earthquake thing they asked about in the first place. Yes, this area will sometime in the future be hit by a fairly large earthquake...but I plan to be dead and buried before that (and I'm only 30). Earthquakes...earthquakes....I remember we have had a few....so horrible they where that I slept through almost all of them...and the one or two I was awake for I didn't even notice.
I say if you don't build a house of baling wire and twigs you should be pretty good earthquake wise. And even if you did, it would survive our 'mega' quakes we have had so far...Portland area is so laid back even our earthquakes can't build up some good steam behind them...
That and volcanoes...ours explode, not erupt. So buy a paper mask in case st. helens decides to eventually getting around to letting one rip again.
Oh, and don't move to the coast and live on the plains against said coast. Or do and buy a good car to drive up the hill with your hours of tsunami warning
Hell, just walk up the hills.... That was my parents little joke about them wanting to move to the coast for years now due to the 'omg big earthquake coming' in the near future thing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-17-2011, 07:23 PM
 
3,973 posts, read 7,352,619 times
Reputation: 1576
Quote:
Originally Posted by pw72 View Post
Ignore above...somehow my text was garbled.

Cascadia quakes seem to happen every 500-700 years. There is evidence of a great Japanese quake that affected the PNW coast in 1700, but would have effected very few at the time, due to lack of population.

Today, it would be a different story. There are hundreds of thousands who now live on the Oregon coast, and the result would be much different. I understand the tsnunami warning signs, and that is good start, but are mostly ignored. I also remember false warnings and the confusion that these signs can bring. Work to be done here for sure. The Oregon coast is ill-prepared for a Japanese style quake.
Yes, I was remembering it inaccurately. I had read about the 1700 quake, and yes, it orginally was a PNW quake that caused a tsunami in Japan. Still, fatalities in our area would have been few at this time due to a small population. Thanks for the correction.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2011, 08:49 PM
 
758 posts, read 1,384,784 times
Reputation: 327
It would be a giant roller that would go on for 5-10 minutes. Wood frame stuff is fine - cracked sheetrock and stuff.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2011, 02:03 PM
 
Location: the Beaver State
6,476 posts, read 6,319,565 times
Reputation: 3297
Quote:
Originally Posted by pw72 View Post
Yes, I was remembering it inaccurately. I had read about the 1700 quake, and yes, it orginally was a PNW quake that caused a tsunami in Japan. Still, fatalities in our area would have been few at this time due to a small population. Thanks for the correction.
And possibly created the original Bridge of the Gods.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Oregon > Portland

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top