U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Oregon > Portland
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-27-2011, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Sometimes Portland, other times LA
600 posts, read 1,257,872 times
Reputation: 236

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by friggsdottir View Post
This guy makes a compliment about Vancouver and people seem to get bent out of shape about it. It's just right over the river... Is there some kind of Vancouver snobbery that I'm not aware of (I'm a new resident to the area) ?
yes, Vancouver is really not that great of an area. To be fair though it takes a long time resident to see that
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-27-2011, 10:18 AM
 
86 posts, read 76,345 times
Reputation: 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by backdrifter View Post
This is all true.

And Vancouver really isn't that great (I live there now). There are some very nice family neighborhoods (Cascade Park, in particular is verrrry lovely) and some areas along Evergreen and north of downtown are rather nice. Parts of Minnehaha seem alright too, but overall? Ew. Fisher's Landing and Salmon Creek are Suburbia, USA. Hazel Dell and Orchards are skeezy looking. The Villages (I think they're called that... bordered by I-5, Fourth Plain, Andresen, and SR-500) actually are skeezy. And The Heights is like a 60's nightmare.

Overall, the education levels are lower, the teen pregnancy rates are higher, half the pickups seem to be given the monster truck treatment, the water doesn't taste as good (fluoridated I believe), more redneck/neo-con/Christian right-wing culture... So there are good reasons for the snobbery.

Personally, I would rather live in Gresham, Beaverton, Milwaukie, Oregon City, or Lake Oswego if I had to live in the suburbs forever. Gresham and Lake O are prettier, Beaverton is nicer, more diverse, and more cultured, with better restaurants and shopping, and then Oregon City and Milwaukie feel more like nice, smaller towns.
So how come you live there, may I ask? I don't think it's all nice, in fact didn't see much of the couve at all (just couple nice spots). But seemed like nice place. I used to live in South with lots of christian rights...there are pluses and minuses.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2011, 10:19 AM
 
86 posts, read 76,345 times
Reputation: 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnricoV View Post
Yeah, there is a bit. Just too many circumstances of automobile accidents with uninsured drivers, who all are from Vancouver. I think that's changing, as more new housing has gone in there. But historically, yeah. Not the greatest rep.

But the issue is more with the OP ... who seems to exhibit trollish behavior, doing nothing but starting thread after thread with complaints about Portland. It's grown tedious.
well I had some rough days in Portland, but looking at the bright side now, trying to. Some days I like more than other.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2011, 10:30 AM
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
6,829 posts, read 14,605,165 times
Reputation: 8839
When I lived in Vancouver (over on the east side in the 164th/192nd corridor), people - particularly families - were moving there in droves from Portland for two main reasons: houses were much cheaper and the Evergreen School District had a reputation for quality and area voters were actually voting FOR school levees to improve the school system.

Unfortunately, run-away growth levels and over-expansion led to a decrease in school quality, massive congestion on the roads (the Mill Plain/Chkalov intersection held the "honor" of being the worst in the entire state) and higher (relative) housing prices. In the 10 years or so we lived there, the 7 mile drive down 164th from our house went from 12 minutes to 25 minutes - the speed limit was 40, but the average speed was down below 20 because of all the added lights.

The main problem with the Cascade Park area is that while some of the neighborhoods have nice paths and are walkable, overall the area is not. You get in your car and drive to Trader Joe's, then drive over to one of the two excellent restaurants (if they are still there) Roots and Applewood (passing a ton of mediocre chain restaurants), drive over to Fred's for groceries, drive over to Whole Foods for interesting cheeses and a good deli. It's not a town, it's a collection of shopping malls. You can't walk, transit is very poor.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2011, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Syracuse, New York
3,096 posts, read 2,406,892 times
Reputation: 2253
Maybe Vancouver reminds the OP of home. In the mid-nineties, when I hit the Vancouver Mall, Vancouver didn't remind me of Syracuse. Now, in terms of google-mapped urban sprawl, Vancouver and Clark County bear a striking resemblence to Syracuse and Onondaga County's sprawling northern suburbs.

Vancouver must have that everytown feel that some of the nation's cul de sac kids feel comfortable with.

"Hey look, there's a Ruby Tuesday's and an Applebee's! I know them!"

Last edited by SyraBrian; 05-27-2011 at 02:25 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2011, 02:27 PM
 
Location: the Beaver State
6,468 posts, read 11,163,447 times
Reputation: 3513
Quote:
Originally Posted by SyraBrian View Post
Maybe Vancouver reminds the OP of home. In the mid-nineties, when I hit the Vancouver Mall, Vancouver didn't remind me of Syracuse. Now, in terms of google-mapped urban sprawl, Vancouver and Clark County bear a striking resemblence to Syracuse and Onondaga County's sprawling northern suburbs.

Vancouver must have that everytown feel that some of the nation's cul de sac kids feel comfortable with.

"Hey look, there's a Ruby Tuesday's and an Applebee's! I know them!"
Of course it has sprawl. The Urban Growth Boundary law only affected Oregon Cities. Vancouver and Clark County especially were more then happy to get taxes from people wanting cheap land "close" to Portland to build on.

Happy Valley and Clackamas are a lot like this too, as is the entire Tannasbourne area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2011, 03:04 PM
 
86 posts, read 76,345 times
Reputation: 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by SyraBrian View Post
Maybe Vancouver reminds the OP of home. In the mid-nineties, when I hit the Vancouver Mall, Vancouver didn't remind me of Syracuse. Now, in terms of google-mapped urban sprawl, Vancouver and Clark County bear a striking resemblence to Syracuse and Onondaga County's sprawling northern suburbs.

Vancouver must have that everytown feel that some of the nation's cul de sac kids feel comfortable with.

"Hey look, there's a Ruby Tuesday's and an Applebee's! I know them!"
yea exactly.

I never felt at home in Portland. Vancouver was so normal, relative to my standards. I have been to a few cities that looked like that. Portland so unique.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-27-2011, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington
2,316 posts, read 6,699,847 times
Reputation: 1689
Quote:
Originally Posted by derniss View Post
So how come you live there, may I ask? I don't think it's all nice, in fact didn't see much of the couve at all (just couple nice spots). But seemed like nice place. I used to live in South with lots of christian rights...there are pluses and minuses.
You bring up a good point about putting the right-wing thing into perspective--this area would be considered moderate in most of the country, but for the West Coast it is rather conservative. This congressional district was the only one in the PNW to elect a tea partier or someone somewhat connected to the Tea Party or their ideologies... Anyway, I'm a student and want to earn my residency in Washington to transfer to a school up here while maintaining my life in Portland for the time being--and that's why I live in Vancouver.

But basically what PNW-type-gal describes is why I dislike it. Strip malls and big box stores and drive through cigarette shops and Walmarts and 8 lane wide surface streets with zero walkability or transit options are not my ideas about a nice, liveable community.

There are definitely some very nice (residential) neighborhoods in Vancouver and some good schools if that is a key issue (for families I realize it is) and it also has the affordability factor which is huge.

If suburbs are your cup of tea, then, to make an analogy, it is an alright one: more Stash than fine, hand-cut and hand-selected, artisan brew, but better than Lipton at least.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Oregon > Portland
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top