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Old 07-14-2011, 08:21 PM
 
Location: the Beaver State
6,468 posts, read 11,195,605 times
Reputation: 3513

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Quote:
Originally Posted by shaun007miller View Post
I have enjoyed reading this thread. The traffic in Portland is bad due to simply having bad drivers. Drivers that seem to drive slow in the left lane do this because of the lack of freeway options in the city. Portland is one of the poorest cities when it comes to how the freeway system was designed. I-5 is N & S. I-205 actually serves no purpose what so ever. It is a glorified bypass. Portland's congested traffic is simply solved by making 205 a loop around the entire city and by adding another hwy that runs E and W. I would like everyone to look at the freeway system in Kansas City and try to imagine that in Portland. The traffic in Portland is mainly due to the city governments unwillingness to evolve with time over the last 30 years.
You need to do a little research there. Wikipedia talks about the history a tiny bit, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freeway...volts#Portland

Essentially Portland rebelled against the original proposed plans for upwards of a dozen freeways criss-crossing the city. It was scaled down to six, and only four of those were built. Politics, funding, and unwillingness to compromise the livability of the city killed the rest.

The second paragraph in this Mercury article says it well: http://www.portlandmercury.com/portl...nt?oid=1676323

"When current transit planners visit from exotic Houston and DC to admire Portland's progress, what they are really admiring are the roads not built—freeways erased from the maps decades ago."

Just realized - at the above link there is another link to a copy of the original plan.
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Old 07-14-2011, 10:45 PM
 
Location: SE Portland, OR
1,167 posts, read 2,149,016 times
Reputation: 620
Quote:
Originally Posted by hamellr View Post
The second paragraph in this Mercury article says it well: The Dead Freeway Society | Bikes | Portland Mercury
That was an outstanding read. Thanks for that!
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Old 07-15-2011, 09:43 PM
 
12 posts, read 21,722 times
Reputation: 15
I guess I meant that I would like to see 205 as a loop, 5 is N and S, 26 & 84 running E and W and I would like to see a E and W hwy on the S side of town, maybe if 217 continued E, and another N and S option. I'm just disappointed with Portland and what it has become. It's a beautiful town that has terrible traffic congestion when it doesn't have too. Traffic could flow so easy with no slow downs or congestion barring any traffic accidents. But my solution has been to move west out of town all together. The traffic beat me. Actually, I grew up in a rural area, and I enjoy being back. I just wish the city would take into consideration all of the people of Portland and not just a certain demographic.
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Old 07-16-2011, 10:01 AM
 
Location: the Beaver State
6,468 posts, read 11,195,605 times
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217 was originally supposed to continue North. It was killed because to do so would have required changing the Urban Growth Boundary rules and destroying quite a bit of critical farmland. It would have also been quite expensive to build at the time as would have needed to go over the West Hills through Forest Park, or as a Tunnel, with little perceived need at the time.

The thing you need to remember when talking about Portland's highway system is that it was a 1940's design, scaled back in the 1960's to accommodate a 30% population growth over 50 years, but now serves a nearly 200% population growth in the same amount of time.

Another point is that modern traffic design actually believes that some highways are a bad thing and actively contribute to the congestion problem. Major cities around the world are removing highways and seeing drastic decreases in traffic, pollution and economic prosperity in their downtown cores. This is just the first Google hit on "highway removal": Huh?! 4 Cases Of How Tearing Down A Highway Can Relieve Traffic Jams (And Save Your City) | INFRASTRUCTURIST

This is why so many Portlanders are against the building of the new Columbia River Crossing. Besides the obscene cost, many feel it's going to decrease the livability of our city.

Either way, my experience is that Portland Congestion isn't really that bad compared to other cities it's size. We're certainly not even close to what Seattle or LA can get too. I feel that even Boise has worse traffic then we do, having been stuck in traffic trying to cross the city for nearly six hours just last year.
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Old 07-19-2011, 04:14 PM
 
12 posts, read 21,722 times
Reputation: 15
I just love Portland so much, I have to say that the traffic issue is really my only complaint. The people in Portland seem to be friendly, maybe a little too friendly. Strangers seem to always want to strike up a conversation with me. I understand that the population here is quite large, with the influx of people from California and different parts of the country, and the traffic here is a result of that population increase. I still believe that with a few route changes traffic here would improve. I also understand that will never happen, but if traffic is my biggest complaint with Portland, then I should consider myself lucky. You are right hamellr, traffic is worse in other cities. I should just be thankful I don't live in St. Louis.
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Old 08-07-2011, 06:07 PM
 
33 posts, read 65,063 times
Reputation: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by hose111 View Post
For most part, I say it's rare. But every now and then I see a very angry aggressor. I was trying to make a left to get coffee today. This lady was beeping at me, I guess I was going to slow for her. So this made me angry. But why did she not slow down, more considerate? I have had these experiences and not sure why some people so angry here. It's a beautiful city, we all have worry about paying bill. Thank you for any support.
To me, the angry drivers stand out because they're so rare. In Florida, everyone drives like the worst drivers here, so I didn't notice it before. I'm still always amazed at how considerate drivers here are. And anyone who's driven in New York would die laughing to hear you call Portland drivers angry. I think I've been honked at twice here, and once it was because I was turning the wrong way down a one-way street.
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Old 08-07-2011, 06:13 PM
 
1,460 posts, read 1,617,132 times
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angry drivers in western oregon come to the realization that there are two things you dont get here...you dont get sunshine, and you dont get in a hurry. the majority of the drivers here think they are the only ones on the road. i would say its a lack of vitamin d that you normally get in a state where the sun shines.
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Old 08-07-2011, 06:15 PM
 
Location: earth?
7,288 posts, read 10,412,552 times
Reputation: 8956
OMG. You really think it has to do with a particular area?

Some people are angry.
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Old 08-07-2011, 06:31 PM
 
3,971 posts, read 11,476,644 times
Reputation: 1576
Wishful thinking about new freeways being built in the Portland area. This will not happen unless local politics changes dramatically, and/or gas prices fall and stay cheap, and/or technology makes driving much more economical.
Earlier comments about how bad it is in many other areas ring true. Visit most parts of Florida, Texas, Arizona, or Boston, Washington DC, or Philly, or name your big city...and you will realize NW drivers, especially Oregonians, are not particularly rude, aggressive or angry. Yes, the Seattle area has some issues with this, but still not nearly as bad as most other areas.

Quick story. Many years ago I locked my keys in my car at the rest stop just south of Wilsonville. Even with Washington plates, I had atleast three different people realize my predicament and they did everything they could to help me out. I will always remember that as being an "Oregon" thing to do.

Any area will have a some angry drivers. Heck, I've seen it in Tri-Cities, WA, and Cheyenne, WY. The difference is how predominate they are. As I said, there are many areas of the country where it is much more pronounced, but perhaps they stand out in areas where most are polite and considerate.
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Old 08-08-2011, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Just outside of Portland
4,413 posts, read 5,531,290 times
Reputation: 4421
Quote:
Originally Posted by pw72 View Post
Wishful thinking about new freeways being built in the Portland area. This will not happen unless local politics changes dramatically, and/or gas prices fall and stay cheap, and/or technology makes driving much more economical.

You got that right! Current Portland City leaders would rather spend millions and millions on light rail, streetcar, bike lanes, trams, rather than spend a dime on anything that would benifit automobiles.

Our roads are falling apart, city infrastructure is old and dated, but not a dime is spent for any improvements, just basic maintainance, and not the preventative kind.
For example, how long has Front Street been a minefield to drive on?
The main street that shows off the City and Waterfront Park and it's been full of potholes and needing repavement for at least a decade now. How ugly and screwed up and dangerous is the west side approach to the Ross Island bridge?

Portlands philosophy on car commuting goes like this:
If there is traffic flow and congestion problems, make it worse so people will quit driving and take public transportaion. This will relieve the load on the roadways because less people will be driving and the problems will disappear.

Hopefully with the coming change in the City's leadership, things will change. Too bad it will take a year and a half to see who will run Portland next.
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