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Old 01-17-2012, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
6,743 posts, read 7,406,753 times
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If a large company wanted to move here and couldn't find a site I am confident that the folks who manage the UGB would work with them.

Hamellr, can you give me an example of any employer who passed us over because of the UGB?
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Old 01-17-2012, 12:11 PM
 
1,027 posts, read 646,185 times
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"Bad economy" seems to be the only thing that is able to control population and urban sprawl now, as there're no laws or regulations controlling that, so you got to give credit to it.
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Old 01-17-2012, 01:20 PM
 
Location: the Beaver State
6,477 posts, read 5,961,850 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nell Plotts View Post
If a large company wanted to move here and couldn't find a site I am confident that the folks who manage the UGB would work with them.

Hamellr, can you give me an example of any employer who passed us over because of the UGB?
The Portland area UGB is managed by Metro. That's 30 or 35 different agencies involved there so things go slow. They've been discussing adding another 6000 acres near Hillsboro for nearly ten years now, but it's not impossible to get them to move.

Intel got around the UGB by building in unincorporated Washington County. Nike was grand fathered in as the land it was built on was originally the Washington County Fairgrounds back in the 1920's. It was also in unincorporated Washington County though.

Boeing worked through the process, and were able to get it fast tracked due to the promise of thousands of jobs. But that was still a couple of years before they even broke ground. We know how well that worked out in the long run.

I would almost say that Google and Facebook did the same, but I haven't checked for sure. I'm sure the City is looking to annex them as soon as possible.

The only examples I know of off hand are a couple of (~500 employees) nursery companies that wanted to build mega-nursuries out near Sandy. One ended up not doing anything, while the other ended up buying several family farms and existing nurseries and just dealt with the distance between farms.

I can't imagine that there haven't been other companies that have tried though. The Port of Portland is/was drastically under used for a long time making it very attractive as a shipping point. Especially as we're on the end of two transcontinental rail roads, and major routes north and south.
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Old 01-17-2012, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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I know a little about the nursery companies. Their operations are not subject to the AGB because they are agriculture. They were going great guns as a result of the housing boom and assumed this demand would continue. One predated the UGB and has, for all practical purposes, gone bankrupt. The other with headquarters in CA that buys up family farms I think has pulled in their horns concentrating on HomeDepot and the like.
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Old 01-22-2012, 01:28 AM
 
Location: Oregon
499 posts, read 731,190 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alexxiz View Post
"Bad economy" seems to be the only thing that is able to control population and urban sprawl now, as there're no laws or regulations controlling that, so you got to give credit to it.
certainly not true for the state you are posting in. Oregon is practically frozen with land use and zoning/ building / development restrictions.
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Old 01-22-2012, 01:41 AM
 
Location: Oregon
499 posts, read 731,190 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turquoise1 View Post
Hamellr, what are the urban growth boundaries, how to they prevent Portland from being a big city, and what mistakes have others made? I'm totally unfamiliar with these subjects, as a newcomer. I hope you don't mind my questions.
essentially the urban growth boundaries are the limits of the city/ metropolitan area for building housing and other types of development like stores etc. it's the boundary between the farmland/city. The way they currently have it determined, it doesn't actually stop urban sprawl or stop the city from eating the farms. it only causes that to be slowed down. after a few years, there will always be expensive processes and governmental hearings etc and then the big developers get to come in and develop huge parcels into housing and etc.
so really, Oregon has become tightened up for individuals who only want to build one house on their own land for themselves, but these developers get to exploit their cronies' laws and rape (or is it reap?) the huge profits while destroying much needed farmland. And very little , slow, incremental, individual development ever occurs in any sort of natural or healthy way for say, people who own farms 20 miles out from town. They often aren't allowed to build a home for themselves or a second one for their kids 20 years later on their same shared yard space on a small corner of their acreage. That would be a good and economical way of providing and living but it is not allowed because of strict zoning laws. Seems this would be a serious impedance for the locals that actually live here and want to thrive, prosper, and grow a healthy family on their own land.
well that's only a tiny pinch of my opinion about it but, i have been observing this from an insider viewpoint for decades, as my mom was heavily involved (favoring tight restrictions) back when it all started and now i see the results....

Last edited by 2bpurrfect; 01-22-2012 at 02:02 AM..
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Old 01-22-2012, 01:46 AM
 
Location: Oregon
499 posts, read 731,190 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turquoise1 View Post
thanks!

I'm kind of surprised that this boundary exists, because the east side seems very sprawling to me.
that's because most of it was plotted /permitted out or built already before the zoning laws started sometime about 40 years ago.
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Old 01-22-2012, 01:58 AM
 
Location: Oregon
499 posts, read 731,190 times
Reputation: 342

Well, this info might help: seattle median household income was about $17,000 more than portland, although the figures for seattle are a year older:

KING COUNTY (SEATTLE) MEDIAN INCOME 2009

Per capita personal income and median household income in King County



MULTNOMAH COUNTY (PORTLAND) MEDIAN INCOME 2010

Multnomah County QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau

and of course there are plenty of other facts to look at that can give a comparison.
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Old 01-23-2012, 04:57 AM
 
1,021 posts, read 1,157,773 times
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I can see that portland's population dont earn as much, and there is no microsoft and boeing. but like i said, i was shocked at how much cheaper a house is over there, gas is cheaper, and there is no sales tax there. I lived in seattle for 10 yrs and I really need to go to the suburbs to get a decent 1500 sf home for 200k. i see in portland, even in city limits, there are 150k homes. in seattle, 150k and in city limits, 1500 sf home, ususally means dangeorus neighborhood or needs lots of work.
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Old 01-23-2012, 10:14 AM
 
Location: the Beaver State
6,477 posts, read 5,961,850 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by civic94 View Post
i see in portland, even in city limits, there are 150k homes. in seattle, 150k and in city limits, 1500 sf home, ususally means dangeorus neighborhood or needs lots of work.
I don't know how much the housing market has changed in SF and Seattle, but those 150k homes in Portland city limits were in the $250k range just a few years ago.

I think Portland managed to miss most of the bubble, but it still effected us. I'm also willing to bet that those $150k houses still have a ways to drop before things even out.
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