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Old 04-09-2012, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
6,736 posts, read 7,389,242 times
Reputation: 2830
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5cents View Post
2. Traffic - you mention wanting to get out of Bay Area traffic and that you were impressed with Portland's rush hour. So this is actually one of the areas where I feel disappointed by PDX. I didn't have a bad commute in the Bay Area (Sunnyvale to Palo Alto) but drove around enough to know about the bad traffic there. I didn't have to do 101 or 880 much. But I would not say that Portland traffic is light. There is pretty much always a rush hour traffic jam in at least a half-dozen places around the city on 26 down to the tunnel, I-5 and 205 bridges, 217 down through Beaverton, 84 on the east side... anyways, FWIW I don't feel like traffic management is that good here. For being a smaller metro area, the traffic is worse than I would have expected. Maybe it's just my perspective.
I actually agree. We don't have that traffic column in our local paper such as found in the San Jose news.

Daughter commutes from Los Altos to Menlo Park daily.. I know of that which you speak.
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Old 04-09-2012, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
79 posts, read 47,443 times
Reputation: 43
5cents, thanks for the traffic info and the bike link! My husband is currently commuting from South San Jose to Mountain View. Sunnyvale to Palo Alto sounds like a much better commute. We used to live in Campbell, and that was much easier. I just looked on Google Maps, and it looks like I was mistaken, it is only 23 miles each way. Regardless, it can get badly backed-up during rush hour. Hopefully my husband will be back on his bike. He is much less stressed when he gets a daily ride. Riding some time sounds like fun! I will keep that in mind :-)
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Old 04-09-2012, 09:11 PM
 
Location: SE Portland, OR
1,167 posts, read 1,236,756 times
Reputation: 597
Quote:
Originally Posted by PonderingPortland View Post
My husband currently drives about 30 miles each way to work. Traffic can get pretty heavy, and on some days adds a lot of time to his commute. When we first got married he used to ride a bike as his primary form of transportation. We were a one car family for years. He wants to return to a bicycle commute, so within about 25 minutes bike ride from downtown would be ideal for us. He really does not like driving, and it seems that downtown parking can be hard to come by unless you are renting a space.
I'm right in that boat. That kind of a driving commute would be my nightmare, and I would probably think hard about either moving or switching jobs. It's so nice to be back biking again after a broken bone forced me to ride in our car to work.
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Old 04-10-2012, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Jennings Lodge, OR
341 posts, read 270,180 times
Reputation: 233
Definitely look into renting near the Springwater Corridor- it's like a bike freeway to downtown in the mornings! Except for a short stretch in Sellwood, it's all self-contained, and much of it's gorgeous (passing through or near several wildlife refuges, awesome river views) Eventually (and it may be a long "eventually!) the Sellwood bit is supposed to be rerouted and the Springwater is supposed to connect to the Trolley Tail just finishing construction, and then you'll be able to ride from downtown all the way to Gresham or Gladstone without having to get on a street.
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Old 04-10-2012, 07:31 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
79 posts, read 47,443 times
Reputation: 43
Crisw, I love the sound of a bike freeway! I am looking at a map of it now, and I believe we saw the part by Sellwood Park and the Wildlife Refuge when we were there in January. Is it very busy during high traffic times?
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Old 04-10-2012, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Jennings Lodge, OR
341 posts, read 270,180 times
Reputation: 233
Depends on how nice the day is :>)

I've never had a problem using it on weekdays (most of the riders out then are serious commuters); it's worse on nice weekends when there are lots of little kids running around, tots just learning to ride bikes, and dogs with inattentive owners, all presenting an interesting dodge-em game.
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Old 04-11-2012, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Portland, OR
53 posts, read 48,780 times
Reputation: 38
Yes, very true. It is definitely not a high-speed road biker's cruising path on the weekends. If you have a bell you will be ringing it every minute on a nice Saturday on that path. Still a great resource though!
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Old 04-12-2012, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Undisclosed location in the desert SW
184 posts, read 213,931 times
Reputation: 151
The line about removing freeways and how it reduces congestion is a bunch of garbage. That same thinking has been espoused by progressives in the last 20 years or so and has absolutely no basis and there is no way to disprove a negative. Horrible, horrible reductive reasoning.
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Old 04-12-2012, 11:41 AM
 
Location: the Beaver State
6,477 posts, read 5,948,681 times
Reputation: 3287
Quote:
Originally Posted by nevadaned View Post
The line about removing freeways and how it reduces congestion is a bunch of garbage. That same thinking has been espoused by progressives in the last 20 years or so and has absolutely no basis and there is no way to disprove a negative. Horrible, horrible reductive reasoning.
You're behind the times. Real world examples exist with real data. Portland was the first to remove a freeway in the 1960s, creating Waterfront Park. Surveys showed a 9.6% reduction in vehicle trips on surrounding streets and bridges.

ITDP | Institute for Transportation and Development Policy : Library

Next American City Buzz End of the Roads: When Highway Removal Works

Next American City Buzz INTERVIEW: John Norquist and Our Congestion Obsession

""For example, when the Embarcadero Freeway, a double-deck freeway, was torn down, a majority of the trips—according to a study by the city of San Francisco—got shorter and faster because of the increased connectivity. With the freeway, there were a lot of trips where you overshot your destination and had to come back. It also attracted trips that didn’t add any value to the neighborhood: People going from Oakland to Marin County were cutting through San Francisco. When the freeway was torn down and replaced by a boulevard, it suddenly didn’t look so attractive to go that way, and [drivers] found a different way to get to Marin Country or, in some cases, didn’t make the trip."

http://streetswiki.wikispaces.com/Highway+Removal

"Opponents of highway removal proposals fear the tearing down of such high-capacity roadways will lead to increased traffic congestion, lack of emergency evacuation routes, and economic collapse of urban cores as suburban commuters or shoppers opt for more car-oriented areas. The data suggest otherwise. A study of highway removals in 11 different countries found that 14-25% of the traffic disappeared completely, and that few if any of the removals resulted in the “traffic chaos” warned of by opponents.[2] In fact, just as new highways always results in induced traffic that would not otherwise have occurred, removing highway lanes or entire structures reduces the level of traffic, and travelers opt for other times, other modes, or forgo trips altogether and meet their needs locally."

And from our neighbors to the North: http://www.cityofseattle.net/transpo...%20removal.pdf

"Studies have shown that the addition of capacity can actually increase congestion by “funneling” traffic into a single direct route, rather than distributing it over a network."

Not EVERY Freeway being removed would reduce congestion, but there is ample data showing that Freeway removal in downtown cores specifically would make a huge difference.
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Old 04-12-2012, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
6,736 posts, read 7,389,242 times
Reputation: 2830
hamellr is correct, I have seen the data too.
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