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Old 10-01-2013, 08:59 AM
 
Location: NJ
414 posts, read 423,220 times
Reputation: 128

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ladderoflocus View Post
If you want to live in a city full of large corporations, there's always nearby Seattle. You can work in Amazon and live in the sterile South Lake Union in a studio for $2000 a month. Or if you are frugal, you can live in a nearby 150 square foot Apodment or micro-studio for $850; you get a room, private bath and kitchenette (no stove or oven but there's a communal kitchen to cook in). Seattle rocks!
u can also live in 1 bd apt in decent seattle suburbs for $800-900 a month
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Old 10-01-2013, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,055 posts, read 27,744,446 times
Reputation: 7822
Seattle is a great city. It is the city where you move to, get a job with a big corporation, and make lots of money. When you get tired of that, you create a product, move to Portland and open up your own corporation doing what you love.
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Old 10-01-2013, 11:17 AM
 
Location: NJ
414 posts, read 423,220 times
Reputation: 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Seattle is a great city. It is the city where you move to, get a job with a big corporation, and make lots of money. When you get tired of that, you create a product, move to Portland and open up your own corporation doing what you love.
true, might be cheaper for self employed people to live in portland
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Old 10-01-2013, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,055 posts, read 27,744,446 times
Reputation: 7822
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronkc View Post
true, might be cheaper for self employed people to live in portland
My messenger bag I own came from a company in Portland that started in the guy's kitchen that has now grown into his own shop and could become the next Chrome bag company if he plays his cards right. Things like that is what Portland is for. Both cities are great for their own reasons. Then there is Tacoma which has been working to make itself an art city in the Northwest and a great place for an artist that wants to be located in the Northwest, near the two big cities but can't afford either.
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Old 10-01-2013, 12:59 PM
 
95 posts, read 90,067 times
Reputation: 102
It's a great question as to where Portland will be in ten years. If you look back ten years, I think there has been noticeable change. A lot probably will depend on what the US and world economies do, but assuming things continue to plug along, it seems inevitable that Portland will get at least some of what Seattle has, both the good and the bad. With continued growth and popularity as a desirable place to live, more people will move here and drive up rents, and also stir the economy. At the same time, I think Portland has a good sense of its own identity and people here tend to do things on their own terms, and it will probably continue to stand out in that way from other places.

That said, does anyone once in a while yearn for the Portland of ten years ago? Before we really hit the map with Portlandia and everything else in the media, it seemed like Portland was a bit more insular and I guess, weird, like the bumper stickers said, for lack of a better word. For example, I haven't seen anyone riding a unicycle around town in quite a while. I never rode one and always thought it seemed pretty crazy for someone to be out doing that in traffic, but, I actually kind of miss seeing them around, and think maybe its indicative on some small level of how the city changed. Or then again, maybe people just got sick of them, who knows?
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Old 10-01-2013, 01:21 PM
 
110 posts, read 144,565 times
Reputation: 95
I lived in the Pearl District in 2002/2003. There were tons on condos in the process of being built at the time. The Pearl was already an "it" place but still felt incomplete compared to today. Other parts of the city havent changed much, but it does seem a bit more mainstream, cleaner and white collar overall now, but nothing like Seattle. There are also many more food options and places to go. In spite of the population growth, Portland still feels like a large town thats not too crowded. I think the human scaled development contributes to that town feeling. Overall, I think I like the Portland of today better than 10 years ago, except for the cost of rent, which has increases by around 75% since then. I just hope rents don't get too out of whack relative to wages.
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Old 10-01-2013, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
59 posts, read 90,782 times
Reputation: 34
Although, I don't live in Portland, I live in Bend and previously lived in Seattle, I keep a close eye on the city as I'm entertaining moving my business there at some point. I do think you will see Portland move from an emerging tech city to an second tier tech city. You can already see the movement of tech companies happening today, and I would bet it will continue to accelerate over the next ten years; bringing the good and bad of such change.

Last edited by nestvine; 10-01-2013 at 01:38 PM..
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Old 10-01-2013, 02:15 PM
(*)
 
Location: City of Roses
57 posts, read 61,618 times
Reputation: 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by ccjarider View Post
Poppycock

The planet is awash in oil and will be for 100 plus years. This is due to technological advances and companies that fund them. It is too bad some of these companies aren't located here.

Portland, while a nice place to live, has a low average income because the "creative" people don't earn much. This is mostly due to lack of demand for their products and services.
Actually, you're right: the planet has a lot of oil and always will - because the majority of it that is now left is of a poor, unusable grade or is too expensive to extract. For all the talk of finite supply, it's true that Earth will never run out of oil. The difference is between reserves and resources, and more specifically economically recoverable reserves. Those are what we are already close to depleting. Once the costs of extracting and refining oil into all the products we enjoy rises to a price so high that we will no longer pay it, the oil industry will become unprofitable. At that point there will still be oil in the ground, but because the oil industry cannot sell it at a profit it will not be extracted and processed.

The difference between "reserves" and "resources" is huge, and one the industry tends to downplay. Wouldn't want to worry their shareholders now, would we? Those of us who aren't oil industry shareholders have no need to buy into the hype; science is our friend.
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Old 10-01-2013, 03:11 PM
 
Location: NJ
414 posts, read 423,220 times
Reputation: 128
i first moved to portland in 2001 and i like it now more than it used to be, as was mentioned, it felt really insular and even more provincial, now with the influx of new people, i feel like its becoming more like a real city, more cosmopolitan, slowly, but surely
also seems more diverse now, hopefully that will continue and hopefully portland will have a stronger local economy and not jus the increased rents
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Old 10-01-2013, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
206 posts, read 196,985 times
Reputation: 289
Awesome is what it will be!
While city center gets more affluent, (read: AWESOME) The standard of living for educated people will rise, while the depressing (and gross!) Poor people will slowly disappear. YAY!! Ill be too busy buying nice things, applauding myself for being so socially concious, and sucking my own fart bubbles to notice. Who cares anyway? We have all these suburbs for poor people and minorities to live in, so they
should be more than happy to relocate.
They will be honored to patronize Local
businesses that pride themselves on
victorian elitism, discrimination and
nepotism. It will be fantastic! You can shop
at a carniceria without having to actually
see a Mexican. As Portland realizes it's ultimate goal of creating a white homeland, they can always look to Gresham and say "look, a black person!"
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