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Old 12-20-2014, 03:05 AM
 
2,430 posts, read 5,755,907 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by (*) View Post
Hey Nikkiness. I moved here from Phoenix, and have to say that PDX has little in the way of solely Latin neighborhoods. I live in NE near Alberta and MLK, which is supposed to be the most ethnically diverse area in town. Have to say though that the area is mainly white and African American. There are a few Latin businesses here and there, but no residential blocks or neighborhoods that stand out as being primarily Latin.
You're just not in the right area. Look at things like school stats to get the details. Not true there are definitely areas with lots of Latino families. The two schools near you are not the most diverse when it comes to Latinos for sure---

Woodlawn School as an example http://www.pps.k12.or.us/schools-c/p...ut.php?rpt=818 is 15% white, 51% black and 21% Latino.

The school closest to you is King which is 47% black, 34% Latino and 9% white.

Then there's the area around Cesar Chavez elementary (st. John's) which is heavily Latino: http://www.pps.k12.or.us/schools-c/p...ut.php?rpt=761 16% black, 57% Latino, 15% white.

The younger generation changes neighborhoods. So if you really want the stats on neighborhoods check out the school profiles. They don't lie. Portland is getting more and more diverse--look at the kids not the 40 year old adults.

Last edited by oldtintype; 12-20-2014 at 03:17 AM..
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Old 12-20-2014, 03:21 AM
 
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BTW, from the PPS website diversity as of last year among school children is (and PPS doesn't go beyond about 105th on the east side so these are not stats from outer SE/NE which is likely more diverse):

10.7% African American
7.9% Asian
16.2% Latino
1.1% Native American
7.4% Multiple
0.9% Pacific Islander
55.8% White (including ethnic white--slavic, Arabic/Middle Eastern, etc.)

Stats (2010 census) always say the city is about 72% (non Latino) white but if you just count kids things are different. Also included in that 72% are groups of people that many don't always consider white stereotypically such as Arabic/Persian/Middle Eastern, Slavic, etc.

However, I think most hip and cool inner Portland neighborhoods are mostly white and that's what gives people the impression that Portland is all white people. Go to neighborhoods off the beaten path and that's where diversity is.
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Old 01-20-2015, 09:45 PM
 
Location: NE Portland
3 posts, read 2,388 times
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We moved from the Bay Area to NE Portland less than a year ago. We live in inner NE and we found a diverse group of friends/acquaintances because we sought it out and are very intentional about the kind of community we want. My husband (who is part Asian) enjoys a bar in NE (Alberta St.) that is frequented by a predominantly Black clientele. We joined a meetup for families who are multiracial. We go to cultural events, etc. You'll find it if you look. And yes, NE is a good place for that.
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Old 01-21-2015, 01:13 PM
 
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I'd agree that NE Portland, especially around 82nd and east, is more diverse than many other parts of the city. While Portland is definitely "whiter" than most other American cities, it seems to me that people of different races may mix more easily here than many other places. We just got back from a trip to New Orleans, a racially diverse city, and I was somewhat surprised at how little mixing there seemed to be. Maybe it was just where we were, but we did go out multiple nights in the french quarter and visited different parts of town and the suburbs (ie. the north shore).
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Old 01-21-2015, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Winter nightime low 60,summer daytime high 85, sunny 300 days/year, no hablamos ingles aquí
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Quote:
Also included in that 72% are groups of people that many don't always consider white stereotypically such as Arabic/Persian/Middle Eastern, Slavic, etc.
Quote:
People think that 76% white means white American born stereotypes perpetuated by the media but if you take away the eastern europeans, the middle eastern population, the northern African population, and all the hispanics what are you left with?
The question of "whiteness" is popping-up confusingly in multiple recent threads, so let's see if we can sort it out.

As every 2nd grader knows, Africa is the Black Continent, so no "white" people can live there by definition. That takes care of the entire northern African population a priori.

Next, as everybody knows, being "white" means first of all, having "white" skin.
The skin of lots of Italians, Greeks, Spaniards and whoever else happens to live in Southern Europe, along with Arabic/Persian/Middle Eastern, is not "white" but some kind of "off-white", "olive", "bronze" etc, in other words, NOT white.
We can safely then remove those nations from the "white" ethnic group.

Moving on to those confusing Slavic people. Most of the Central and Eastern Europe Slavs (Czechs, Poles, Russians) are almost as white as the whitest Scandinavians, but then we have Slavic nations like Bulgarians or Serbs, who resemble Italians more than Swedes.
Better safe than sorry - Slavs are banished from whiteness as well.

We are making progress here - let's look at the hair color next. You can have a pastry-white skin but the truly "white" people have blonde hair, obviously.
Sorry Ireland, you need to find a better home among the Negroid or Mongoloid races.
While on your way there, take much of England, France, Germany, Austria, Holland and almost any other country in Europe along with you.

Are we done yet? Certainly not!
You can dye your hair blonde, and place blue contact lenses in your eyes, but would that make you white?
Of course not. As Dr. Ludwig Ferdinand Clauss would tell you, tall height is the distinctive feature of the truly "white" people. Let's say 6'1+ for men, 5'8+ for women.

How are we doing so far? We managed to shrink the "white" population of Portland from 76% to something like 3-4%.
The next US Census will have some astonishing changes in PDX metro area to report.

Last edited by skiffrace; 01-21-2015 at 04:25 PM..
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Old 01-29-2015, 11:28 AM
 
3 posts, read 3,664 times
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Hm okay well I don't really want to get into a debate; I'm biracial, Cuban on my mom's side, dad is white, I'm white but I'm also latina, being both is possible because here I am

Everybody thank you for giving me some areas to check out. I grew up in SoCal and am coming in from Texas and am used to a mixed demographic and I like diversity. I live in areas where white is not the majority and it doesn't feel weird to me and my family, it's normal.

No hate to anybody.

Thanks everyone
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Old 01-29-2015, 03:06 PM
 
2,430 posts, read 5,755,907 times
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My description came directly from the US census and how they categorize people--their definition of white is apparently not yours but many groups of people are considered white according to the census that may not be "seen" as white. That was my point. My point was also, since you missed it, that diversity is not always about race. There is a dominant culture and some groups don't fit into that dominant culture even if they happen to fit into the census definition of "white." Hope you had fun with your post.

Quote:
Originally Posted by skiffrace View Post
The question of "whiteness" is popping-up confusingly in multiple recent threads, so let's see if we can sort it out.

As every 2nd grader knows, Africa is the Black Continent, so no "white" people can live there by definition. That takes care of the entire northern African population a priori.

Next, as everybody knows, being "white" means first of all, having "white" skin.
The skin of lots of Italians, Greeks, Spaniards and whoever else happens to live in Southern Europe, along with Arabic/Persian/Middle Eastern, is not "white" but some kind of "off-white", "olive", "bronze" etc, in other words, NOT white.
We can safely then remove those nations from the "white" ethnic group.

Moving on to those confusing Slavic people. Most of the Central and Eastern Europe Slavs (Czechs, Poles, Russians) are almost as white as the whitest Scandinavians, but then we have Slavic nations like Bulgarians or Serbs, who resemble Italians more than Swedes.
Better safe than sorry - Slavs are banished from whiteness as well.

We are making progress here - let's look at the hair color next. You can have a pastry-white skin but the truly "white" people have blonde hair, obviously.
Sorry Ireland, you need to find a better home among the Negroid or Mongoloid races.
While on your way there, take much of England, France, Germany, Austria, Holland and almost any other country in Europe along with you.

Are we done yet? Certainly not!
You can dye your hair blonde, and place blue contact lenses in your eyes, but would that make you white?
Of course not. As Dr. Ludwig Ferdinand Clauss would tell you, tall height is the distinctive feature of the truly "white" people. Let's say 6'1+ for men, 5'8+ for women.

How are we doing so far? We managed to shrink the "white" population of Portland from 76% to something like 3-4%.
The next US Census will have some astonishing changes in PDX metro area to report.
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Old 01-29-2015, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Winter nightime low 60,summer daytime high 85, sunny 300 days/year, no hablamos ingles aquí
700 posts, read 1,129,835 times
Reputation: 1122
Quote:
..My description came directly from the US census and how they categorize people-
You categorized Slavic people as not "white", more than once.
Is that what the US census thinks? Really? Russians, Poles, Czechs, Slovenians, Ukrainians, etc will be very surprised.

Quote:
..many groups of people are considered white according to the census
That was my point. "White" (aka Caucasian) is a much larger group than the tiny category you boxed them into.

Quote:
that may not be "seen" as white.
Not seen as white? By whom?
Quote:
I'm white but I'm also latina, being both is possible because here I am
Of course some people are bi-racial, or bi-cultural, or bi-ethnic.
"Cuban on my mom's side, dad is white" will place you in "white" category if your mom was "white", biracial if she was not.

Quote:
My point was also, since you missed it, that diversity is not always about race
My post had nothing to do with diversity, or even "race" in general.
However, when one reads (more than once) that Slavic, or the "eastern europeans", or "all the hispanics" are not "white", a correction is in order.
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Old 01-29-2015, 03:49 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skiffrace View Post
You categorized Slavic people as not "white", more than once.
Is that what the US census thinks? Really? Russians, Poles, Czechs, Slovenians, Ukrainians, etc will be very surprised.

That was my point. "White" (aka Caucasian) is a much larger group than the tiny category you boxed them into.

Not seen as white? By whom?
Of course some people are bi-racial, or bi-cultural, or bi-ethnic.
"Cuban on my mom's side, dad is white" will place you in "white" category if your mom was "white", biracial if she was not.

My post had nothing to do with diversity, or even "race" in general.
However, when one reads (more than once) that Slavic, or the "eastern europeans", or "all the hispanics" are not "white", a correction is in order.
What I said is that Slavic communities can be groups that would be considered "of color" by many in this country, or that they aren't always part of the (privileged) dominant culture (I provided a link in one post that described how high the poverty and unemployment rates are for certain immigrants from those countries) and in general said that the census can be misleading in how it categorizes people and how people view demographics of an area.

When people think white they usually think of what the media portrays as white, often leaving out the many groups that the census includes as white. How many people from Iraq do you think the public views as white?

It was a reminder that people spouting that Portland is all white people need to remember that lots of people not part of the dominant culture in terms of privilege are included in those statistics.

You can take it how you want it.
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Old 01-29-2015, 03:55 PM
 
2,430 posts, read 5,755,907 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skiffrace View Post

However, when one reads (more than once) that Slavic, or the "eastern europeans", or "all the hispanics" are not "white", a correction is in order.
That's not what I said at all. I said there was white, non hispanic as a category. Sometimes hispanics are counted as white, sometimes not.

If you go poll the general public most don't understand how the census groups people. Most people view race as a visual thing. And most people don't get the difference between race or ethnicity or what groups of people experience privilege in the dominant culture vs who doesn't even if the census labels them the same.

I have said repeatedly that the group labeled as "white" on the census is a diverse group--duh, that was the point--that people who look at Portland stats need to realize that there is a lot of diversity in that "white" group, the city is not all blond, american born white people. Statistics can be misleading. Not sure why it's so hard for you to understand that or how you came up with the idea that I'm saying certain people aren't white. I said the census includes people as white that don't necessarily see themselves as part of the dominant culture and who may not be perceived in this country as white (again, ask some muslim/Arab immigrants sometime if they feel like they're perceived as white/part of the dominant culture the way the census says they are) and therefore don't experience the same privilege as the "white" people the media defines as white do. And that Portland has more culture/diversity than the stats imply.
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