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Old 02-11-2015, 04:38 PM
 
1,376 posts, read 894,395 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bler144 View Post
You quoted me, but I'm not sure if you're agreeing/disagreeing or just riffing on what I said.

Cully I agree is pretty transitional, but it's definitely northeast and not in the area generally categorized as "North Portland."

I think one of the reasons North Portland has been able to gentrify so quickly is that they already had a lot of the infrastructure that would make it more appealing to a wealthier clientele moving in - sidewalks in the majority of neighborhoods, bus routes along major roads that connect residential and services, decent parks, at least reasonable routes to downtown via car or bus (plus the MAX).

And to top it off, it's not a very big area geographically, esp. if you cut out the industrial sections and the wetlands which are less densely populated, overlooking the outliers like Bridgeton which is clearly not walkable, but also probably not what most comes to mind for most people in thinking about NoPo either.
I was just adding on to the conversation, basically agreeing with what you were saying and adding my own two cents. Yes, in part the reason North and Northeast Portland gentrified are easy to gentrify is because a lot of the areas have got good bones. Neighborhoods that were built pre-war in Portland tend to be nicer than many of the cheaper ones they annexed. The neighborhoods that have nicer older homes in North Portland and not rows of cheap looking ranch houses with chain link fences and junk out front seem to already be gentrified at this point.

Likewise Cully is a jumble of home-types from different eras though, and there's that Portland annexed land deal where you lack sidewalks or paved roads in part. Roseway and Beaumont-Wilshire and Rose City feel much different--they've got pretty uniform construction styles from a certain era, sidewalks, grid layouts rather than random dead end streets and so on...

I didn't know where Bridgeton was until my wife and I were doing our big house hunting search last year when we basically drove to every corner of Portland and the Metro looking at houses. It's one of those forgotten almost rural corners of Portland like Linnton from what I could tell.
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Old 02-12-2015, 10:39 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CanuckInPortland View Post

I didn't know where Bridgeton was until my wife and I were doing our big house hunting search last year when we basically drove to every corner of Portland and the Metro looking at houses. It's one of those forgotten almost rural corners of Portland like Linnton from what I could tell.
It's the corner of Portland that gentrification forgot!

You could say the same about East Columbia - actually, which I didn't mention since it really crosses the line over into NE. Of course, there are reasons those areas remain cheap - like the airport noise (plus the raceway and I-5) and the fact that getting in/out is somewhat constricted, particularly with how prone I-5 is to backing up in that area these days.

I'd wager flood insurance in East Columbia also wouldn't be cheap, and soil quality is probably dubious despite all the money that's been put into cleaning up the slough.

But if you overlook all that, it's a fairly pretty area.
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Old 02-12-2015, 10:45 AM
 
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I love that there are little corners of Portland that gentrification forgot.

It's now a park for flooding but I did a project just south of Foster around SE 106-108. There used to be several houses there and some of them even had acreage and horses - less than a mile from the green line and New Copper Penny and across the road from a pick-n-pull. They did have bad flooding issues.
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Old 02-12-2015, 10:56 AM
 
1,376 posts, read 894,395 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bler144 View Post
It's the corner of Portland that gentrification forgot!

You could say the same about East Columbia - actually, which I didn't mention since it really crosses the line over into NE. Of course, there are reasons those areas remain cheap - like the airport noise (plus the raceway and I-5) and the fact that getting in/out is somewhat constricted, particularly with how prone I-5 is to backing up in that area these days.

I'd wager flood insurance in East Columbia also wouldn't be cheap, and soil quality is probably dubious despite all the money that's been put into cleaning up the slough.

But if you overlook all that, it's a fairly pretty area.
I had to look up what East Columbia boundaries were on Googlemaps, but there's actually some nice homes in a few streets of that area. Must be great to live in if you're a golfer.

That whole area north of Columbia Blvd is interesting, between the numerous golf courses, industrial, truckstops, wetlands and lakes, scattered houses ranging from rich mansions to trailer parks, and so on. I sort of like the houses right on the river on Marine Drive and the sort of "nautical" feel with those bars and yachts right there.

Is everything north of Columbia Blvd on the flood plain?
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Old 02-12-2015, 11:35 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CanuckInPortland View Post

Is everything north of Columbia Blvd on the flood plain?
Short answer is yes, though when you dig into details it's a bit more complex since there's a system of levees and pumps that's not entirely uniform and the elevation isn't completely static - so for practical purposes it probably breaks out into zones at risk of 10/25/100 year floods.

https://www.portlandoregon.gov/bes/article/147238

If I worked in flood insurance or was on the watershed council I could probably give you a much more detailed answer

But just eyeballing it the roads/buildings around the expo seem like they're maybe 8-10 feet above normal high water mark in the wetlands, whereas around 82nd/Alderwood it's maybe more like 20? And I haven't looked at the actual construction, but Marine Drive seems to run atop an earthen levee that separates most of the wetlands from the river.
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