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Old 04-14-2015, 11:43 AM
 
892 posts, read 2,127,046 times
Reputation: 838

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Okay first thing's first, if this post title got your blood pressure up that's the point. I think it's a ridiculous concept to get all worked up about personally, and that's why I felt like sharing a little history to give some context to the silly ranting that goes on in Portland related online forums about "transplants" versus "real" Portlanders...check out the "changes" that were brought to Portland by these people none of whom were born or raised here.

Abigail Duniway: Born in Groveland, Illinois, arrived in Lafayette via the Oregon Trail in 1852. Her husband was permanently disabled by a runaway team and Abigail had to support the family. She taught school and ran a millinery shop. Angered by stories of injustice and mistreatment of the patrons of her shop, she founded a women’s rights newspaper and was an advocate for women’s sufferage.

Asa Lovejoy: An attorney from Groton, Massachusetts arrived in Oregon via the Oregon Trail in 1842. Lovejoy and William Overton purchased a claim of 640 acres in what is current day Portland. Overton later sold his half to Pettygrove. Lovejoy sold half of his stake to Benjamin Stark in 1846.

Benjamin Stark: Born in New Orleans, Louisiana, sailed to Portland in 1845 with warehouse goods for Pettygrove’s store. In 1846, he purchased half of Lovejoy’s claim for $390 in cash.

Dan Burnside: Born in Vermont. Was a prominent Portland businessman who was a proponent and helped raised funds for the Willamette river channel dredging project in 1866. Burnside Street and the Burnside bridge are named after him.

Francis Pettygrove: Born in Maine, immigrated to Oregon in 1843. Bought a claim to what is now Portland for $50. Pettygrove and Asa Lovejoy performed the infamous coin toss to determine if the town would be named Portland after Portland, Maine or Boston which was Lovejoy’s hometown. Pettygrove won the toss and the claim was named Portland.

George Flanders: Born in Massachusetts, sailed to Oregon in 1843. Began a trading company with his brother-in-law, John Couch. Built a large mansion on the block bounded by NW 19th , 20th, Flanders and Glisan. Couch and Flanders did a booming business selling lumber and supplies to San Francisco during the gold rush.

Giuseppe Arata: Born in Italy, emigrated to Portland in 1883 and established the city’s first liquor store at 267 First St. There were 3 Arata brothers who all owned wholesale or retail liquor businesses. When prohibition was enacted they became one of the largest importers of olive oil on the west coast.

John Couch: Born in Massachusetts, arrived in Oregon City by ship in 1842. Started a trading and wharf company with Capt. George Flanders. In 1845 took a claim of land in Portland known as Couch’s Addition.

John Fremont: Born in Savannah, Georgia. American military officer and explorer sometimes called the Great Pathfinder. From 1842 to 1846, he led expedition parties on the Oregon Trail and mapped volcanoes including Mt St Helens. Congress published Fremont’s “Report and Maps” which guided thousands of overland immigrants from 1845-1849.

Simon Benson: Born in Norway in 1851. Moved to Portland in 1879. Started a logging business and built railroads to carry logs. Built the Benson Hotel, donated 20 drinking fountains to reduce alcohol drinking, promoted construction of the Columbia River Highway.

William Ladd: Born in Vermont, Ladd sailed to Oregon in 1851. He opened a liquor and mercantile company and erected the first brick building in Portland in 1853 on Front St. In 1891, he platted Ladd’s addition. The Ladd Carriage House was an outbuilding to his mansion.

...I'm sure this list could go on, and on, and on, but hopefully these are enough to make the point.
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Old 04-14-2015, 12:05 PM
 
Location: The greatest state of them all, Oregon.
780 posts, read 1,326,181 times
Reputation: 461
I think that a lot of people (1) have a certain concept of what an area SHOULD be like, and (2) like to complain about transplants whose values they don't agree with. Therein lie the problems, IMO.

Furthermore, it seems like another big problem is the overcrowding. It appears that the population of Portland has grown tremendously over the last two or three decades and long-timers aren't liking it much. Understandable.
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Old 04-14-2015, 12:31 PM
 
418 posts, read 520,553 times
Reputation: 581
Why didn't Arata get a street or neighborhood named after him?

Oh, nvm, looks like Troutdale has one.
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Old 04-14-2015, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
9,986 posts, read 16,652,835 times
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I am sure the Native Americans complained about the new arrivals when they were the predominant culture. I honestly feel that they would have had a valid complaint. The rest of us, not so much.
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Old 04-17-2015, 03:17 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
206 posts, read 210,701 times
Reputation: 289
Nice list. You forgot the most important one, though;
Tom McCall: Mayor. Native of Massachusetts, and is remembered today for his openly xenophobic stance against outsiders.
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Old 04-17-2015, 04:57 PM
 
Location: Just outside of Portland
4,613 posts, read 5,853,395 times
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I would consider just about all them the "founders" of Portland, the first real citizens of Portland, not really transplants to Portland, although they are all transplants to Oregon.
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Old 04-17-2015, 05:54 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
9,986 posts, read 16,652,835 times
Reputation: 6391
Actually Tom McCall was reflecting his frustration with unmanaged growth that was costing more money than government entities could afford. Some farmers were concerned that turning fields into housing would destroy the viability of agricultural activity (you need enough produce to support commercial processing), other farmers wanted to sell to developers to fund their retirement, there were concerns about skip development and providing water and sewer services . . the list goes on.

He really wasn't xenophobic, he just admitted that the state wasn't prepared to manage growth.
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Old 04-17-2015, 10:35 PM
 
3,751 posts, read 3,714,703 times
Reputation: 3526
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nell Plotts View Post
Actually Tom McCall was reflecting his frustration with unmanaged growth that was costing more money than government entities could afford. Some farmers were concerned that turning fields into housing would destroy the viability of agricultural activity (you need enough produce to support commercial processing), other farmers wanted to sell to developers to fund their retirement, there were concerns about skip development and providing water and sewer services . . the list goes on.

He really wasn't xenophobic, he just admitted that the state wasn't prepared to manage growth.
I'm liberal to the core and generally I value ecology over business, but Oregon's anti-growth policies are flat out unrealistic at this point with the masses of people moving here. Something needs to change.
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Old 04-17-2015, 11:05 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,499,569 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by valsteele View Post
I'm liberal to the core and generally I value ecology over business, but Oregon's anti-growth policies are flat out unrealistic at this point with the masses of people moving here. Something needs to change.
Which policies are you specifically referring to? And don't say Urban Growth Boundary because that is not an anti-growth policy, that is a controlled growth and density policy.
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Old 04-19-2015, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Just outside of Portland
4,613 posts, read 5,853,395 times
Reputation: 4652
Quote:
Originally Posted by valsteele View Post
I'm liberal to the core and generally I value ecology over business, but Oregon's anti-growth policies are flat out unrealistic at this point with the masses of people moving here. Something needs to change.
Maybe "the masses of people" should stop moving here?

Oregon was a perfectly fine state when it wasn't popular and people weren't moving here in droves.

I guess all of the dire predictions of Oregonians back in the day (don't californicate Oregon, visit but don't stay, etc...) are coming true now, aren't they.
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