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Old 08-21-2015, 07:19 AM
 
336 posts, read 301,477 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nell Plotts View Post
Why on earth should residents of the Riverdale school district feel ashamed for being white??? They found homes they could afford in that area. 95% of Portland metro residents who are white can't afford to live there either. I recently met a family who lives in Riverdale... they are Asian.
Not telling anyone to feel ashamed. Their kids are missing out on the advantages of more school diversity and neighborhood diversity though. And a risk of that un-diverse a bubble, and in that segregated of a metro area, is logically it's more likely kids will develop racist or classist beliefs and also that non-white races likely won't feel as fully represented and welcome there as they would elsewhere. Not telling Riverdale parents how to lead their lives or claiming they're "bad" people or definitely all racist or classist. But not somewhere I'd personally live.

I have same hesitancy towards for example Marin County (Bay Area's least diverse county, overwhelmingly rich and white and known for snootiness).

Those places are in contrast to say Berkeley and some other inner (not outer) East Bay cities which have range of homes/hoods from modest to very fancy and, due to reasons unknown to me, are very racially and ethnically diverse. True, I haven't checked demographics of its wealthiest neighborhoods and some (such as city of Piedmont) appear fairly white but I don't think 90+% white. And its poorest neighborhoods (have lived in a couple) appear pretty high-percentage black. But I'm impressed that Berkeley's public schools follow a lottery system that makes each school have wide socioeconomic and racial variety. (Though someone conservative likely wouldn't feel as welcome as someone liberal.)

Anyone interested in this topic, I found several long city-data threads on race issues in Portland.

Anyway, I've said my piece here. I shared my opinion and appreciated this thread. Am not moving to Oregon. Moving on. There's a lot I still have yet to learn about things like race and socioeconomics.

Last edited by NatureYogi; 08-21-2015 at 08:27 AM..
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Old 08-21-2015, 09:03 AM
 
336 posts, read 301,477 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
30+ yrs plus being employed as a business / tax consultant on each side of the river, (employed by both state govs at the moment) there is a notable difference in the two states and the objectivity (and tolerance) of their residents. (significant difference in politics, political structure / school funding / economy ...)

OR and WA are night and day different, be advised / warned (especially if your info is coming from one side)
Thus you will fit MUCH better in one state or the other, very ez to discern this. It will make a huge impact on your quality of PNW life. I know many who had to cross borders to make a match (both directions and some to ID... (farmers and businesses with large capital equipment investments)).
How are Washington culture and Oregon culture different? Specifically.
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Old 08-21-2015, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Just outside of Portland
4,816 posts, read 6,153,632 times
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Oregonians drive much better than Washingtonians, and we are better looking, not to mention more well-mannered.
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Old 08-21-2015, 05:29 PM
 
Location: WA
3,343 posts, read 4,396,371 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NatureYogi View Post
How are Washington culture and Oregon culture different? Specifically.
They aren't really that different. The rural/urban and eastern/western divides within each state are far greater than the difference between them. Rural farmers from the eastern part of either state are going to be far more similar to each other than to urbanites in either Portland or Seattle.

That said, there are some differences.

Seattle is a much more maritime and industrial city than Portland with a MUCH larger port, shipyards, fishing fleets, and waterfront. Up until recently, Seattle was also a major manufacturing and industrial city with Boeing dominating the scene, although those are slowly sliding away. Portland is a river city, Seattle is a seaport on one of the world's greatest natural harbors. All the techie stuff is pretty new, Seattle has a deep deep maritime history. It was the gateway to Alaska during the Klondike gold rush days and basically still is. Pretty much the entire offshore fishing fleet in Alaska is based out of Seattle.

Washington has a far greater military presence with multiple naval bases, air bases, and army posts. That brings thousands of soldiers and sailors to the state every year, many of whom stay. Oregon hasn't had any active military bases other than Oregon National Guard since the end of World War II. So there is really zero military presence.

Eastern Oregon is mostly mountains and desert with no cities and barely any towns of any size, mainly due to the lack of water and arable land. Eastern Washington has major rivers (Columbia, Spokane, Yakima, etc.) and major federal irrigation projects that has brought much more development and cities to the eastern half of the state.

Economically, Washington has always been more boom and bust whereas Oregon has has had more steady slower growth and it shows in the way that the various cities have developed.

Oregon has had much more progressive land use and tax laws. For example, the urban growth boundaries constrain sprawl around most of the cities in Oregon whereas it is mostly unregulated in Washington. Oregon law preserves the coastline for the public so all beaches in Oregon are public up to the line of vegetation and all traditional public access points must be preserved. Developers can't shut off access to the beach. By contrast, land owners in Washington are able to own the coastline down to the low tide line and in some cases also the submerged lands beyond that and there is very little public access to the shoreline outside of established parks. This is the case both within Puget Sound and also on the outer coast where much of the coastline is reservation land or difficult to access. Oregon's income tax is fairly progressive. Washington's tax code relying primarily on sales tax is one of the most regressive in the country. So if you have above median income you come out ahead in Washington, if you are below medium income you come out ahead in Washington, all other things being equal.
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Old 08-21-2015, 08:01 PM
 
336 posts, read 301,477 times
Reputation: 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
They aren't really that different. The rural/urban and eastern/western divides within each state are far greater than the difference between them. Rural farmers from the eastern part of either state are going to be far more similar to each other than to urbanites in either Portland or Seattle.

That said, there are some differences.

Seattle is a much more maritime and industrial city than Portland with a MUCH larger port, shipyards, fishing fleets, and waterfront. Up until recently, Seattle was also a major manufacturing and industrial city with Boeing dominating the scene, although those are slowly sliding away. Portland is a river city, Seattle is a seaport on one of the world's greatest natural harbors. All the techie stuff is pretty new, Seattle has a deep deep maritime history. It was the gateway to Alaska during the Klondike gold rush days and basically still is. Pretty much the entire offshore fishing fleet in Alaska is based out of Seattle.

Washington has a far greater military presence with multiple naval bases, air bases, and army posts. That brings thousands of soldiers and sailors to the state every year, many of whom stay. Oregon hasn't had any active military bases other than Oregon National Guard since the end of World War II. So there is really zero military presence.

Eastern Oregon is mostly mountains and desert with no cities and barely any towns of any size, mainly due to the lack of water and arable land. Eastern Washington has major rivers (Columbia, Spokane, Yakima, etc.) and major federal irrigation projects that has brought much more development and cities to the eastern half of the state.

Economically, Washington has always been more boom and bust whereas Oregon has has had more steady slower growth and it shows in the way that the various cities have developed.

Oregon has had much more progressive land use and tax laws. For example, the urban growth boundaries constrain sprawl around most of the cities in Oregon whereas it is mostly unregulated in Washington. Oregon law preserves the coastline for the public so all beaches in Oregon are public up to the line of vegetation and all traditional public access points must be preserved. Developers can't shut off access to the beach. By contrast, land owners in Washington are able to own the coastline down to the low tide line and in some cases also the submerged lands beyond that and there is very little public access to the shoreline outside of established parks. This is the case both within Puget Sound and also on the outer coast where much of the coastline is reservation land or difficult to access. Oregon's income tax is fairly progressive. Washington's tax code relying primarily on sales tax is one of the most regressive in the country. So if you have above median income you come out ahead in Washington, if you are below medium income you come out ahead in Washington, all other things being equal.
Thanks for sharing that!
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Old 08-21-2015, 09:13 PM
 
60,102 posts, read 85,034,828 times
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Umm, while I'm not from or have ever been to Oregon, just from doing simple research and from knowing a little bit about the HS sports scene there, I'm wondering why the OP isn't looking east of the River where there are more Black residents along with other groups? What about Parkrose, parts of Gresham, perhaps the Powellhurst-Centennial area, etc....?
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Old 08-22-2015, 11:24 AM
 
Location: WA
3,343 posts, read 4,396,371 times
Reputation: 4122
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Umm, while I'm not from or have ever been to Oregon, just from doing simple research and from knowing a little bit about the HS sports scene there, I'm wondering why the OP isn't looking east of the River where there are more Black residents along with other groups? What about Parkrose, parts of Gresham, perhaps the Powellhurst-Centennial area, etc....?
Those parts of far east Portland are some of the most run down and crime-ridden areas of the whole Portland metro. Not because they are ethnically diverse but because the area is flat and ugly and low rent aging sprawl with few public amenities. That's where you'll find plenty of white meth heads and biker gang types.
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