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Old 11-02-2016, 06:28 PM
 
3,939 posts, read 4,627,436 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjpop View Post
This is an interesting conversation. I've lived off and on in other towns in the Willamette Valley since the mid-1980s, and have observed Portland from a distance before I moved here (burbs) permanently in 2009. To a lot of people who lived in Oregon outside of Portland, we viewed Portland as "the big city." I never viewed it as particularly trendy or cool--actually quite the opposite. It just seemed like another big city to me--it's where we would go to catch a concert or see an arthouse movie that wasn't playing at the Bijou in Eugene and before the Darkside opened in Corvallis. It's where Henry Weinhard's was brewed--so much better than the big brewery swill! Big city, with a major airport (sorry Eugene!) ships in the harbor, air pollution problems and more going on and more choices simply by virtue of its size. Washington Square and Clackamas Town Center were real malls with more stores. Downtown seemed a little seedy, but the Portlandia statue and Pioneer Place got us to visit. By the mid 90s I had lived in a couple of big cities--I knew what they looked like and Portland looked like them.

I saw the tide turning on the perception of Portland after about 2000. From my quiet neighborhood in Corvallis we got Portland TV stations and started hearing people talk up about how great Portland was. People were attracted by the liberal politics, the mass transit system, good food, MICROBREWS, new bands, and a do-it-yourself attitude! But with all of these things, the city's reputation (thanks in large part by glowing articles in the NYT) started to take over what the city actually was, and in the process, Portland started to become a characature of itself. It became the place that people wanted to escape to--to leave their crappy city and move to, based on its reputation. People like a new start, and Portland seemed like a good place to get it. But it's like the city got reinvented without consciously wanting to reinvent itself. It just kind of happened.

Fred Armisen visited and decided he liked what he saw. When Portlandia came on the air the characature was broadcast for all to see. Homes in marginal neighborhoods that were already on their way up in value skyrocketed in price. People thought, "It's where I can finally, at long last, be me!"

It's been interesting. I'm not saying it's been good or bad because that depends on what you want or need in a city, although I will say the growing pains are very apparent. High rent, bad traffic, marginal economic opportunities for many. For me, Portland is still on the plus side. But in 10 years or so when the kids are out on their own? We'll see...
SF changed in a similar way a few decades ago. I was wracking my brain to think of how the transplants of the late 80's- 90's changed SF culture. Here is one. Growing up my neighborhood and my schools always had a diverse group of kids- first, 2nd generation, 3rd generation Italian, Mexican, Irish, Mexican/Irish, Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, to name a few. What we had in common was growing up as American kids and knowing everyone ate each other's foods especially when you were in a family's home as a guest. It was insulting to not eat a meal someone prepared. Plus, in a diverse area its natural to eat a variety of cuisine. I started noticing in college how many transplants would be vegetarian and would talk about animal cruelty while you were eating. People I knew were not brought up this way. I thought it was disrespectful. It became the norm where you would be at an event and you would need to hear somebody from upstate NY talking about your meal and what slaughterhouse houses are like. As years went on the typical SF transplant was like this. Now, when I tell people that I am from SF I get asked if I am vegetarian. I have always eaten meat. It's just that there is a stereotype with Bay Area people being granola and vegetarian even though most of us that actually grew up there eat all kinds of food.

Now the techie bros that have taken over my hometown have changed the cultural landscape so the city I once loved is no more in many ways.

Of course, Portland is changing but it probably won't be as drastic as SF.
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Old 11-02-2016, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Portland Metro
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I agree, YM. One thing I see that will be a positive permanent change is the greater amount of racial diversity here. Your description of SF in the 70s with the variety of kids of different backgrounds is so different from the lily white complexion of Portland even 15 years ago, and that still exists today in much of the city. Really, I see a heckuva lot more people of color around Washington Square than I ever do around Irvington.
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Old 11-02-2016, 07:32 PM
 
3,939 posts, read 4,627,436 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jjpop View Post
I agree, YM. One thing I see that will be a positive permanent change is the greater amount of racial diversity here. Your description of SF in the 70s with the variety of kids of different backgrounds is so different from the lily white complexion of Portland even 15 years ago, and that still exists today in much of the city. Really, I see a heckuva lot more people of color around Washington Square than I ever do around Irvington.
Yup! This is the main reason I feel at home in WA County! My neighborhood has people from all over the world. I found the trendy parts of Portland to be pretty bland. I think WA County has been preparing itself to be a cultural center of the metro. I love the mix of people out here. My family from The Bay Area really feels at home at our new house in Beaverton so it definitely has a more noticeable global feel to it.
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Old 11-02-2016, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Left coast
2,320 posts, read 1,694,820 times
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just came in from...setting posts in concrete....
dry day right/ not to be wasted around here...

hmmm I see the conversation is still going....

my point was not that I think pool is "cool" but that the perception is that people- Californians in particular - are moving here because there is a cool factor (to Portlands formerly? blue collar laid back vibe)- is erroneous--

I was saying that theres a real life factor to the influx -- the COL being lower in comparison to much of CA, and just other mundane things that cause people to move(life, actually) not just people looking on a map for "cool " places to move to/ how often does that really happen anyway, except for that small window of time people are graduating school or leaving home on their own for the first time....
And yes there is an actual Taqueria on the corner (catty corner from Tortlandia on Foster) which has actual latino owners and workers (my partner had trouble explaining his order to them, d/t their poor English- and his poor Spanish skills/ ironic considering he spent 2 years in central america)...

the pool comment was about getting out there in your hood, checking in with the people around you to take the cultural temperature of your community-

I think that our perception of our neighborhood as friendly is because we are good neighbors- keep our sidewalks clean, the lawn and garden tidy, and are generally conscious and our neighbors are appreciative...
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Old 11-02-2016, 09:10 PM
 
3,939 posts, read 4,627,436 times
Reputation: 3072
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAjerseychick View Post
just came in from...setting posts in concrete....
dry day right/ not to be wasted around here...

hmmm I see the conversation is still going....

my point was not that I think pool is "cool" but that the perception is that people- Californians in particular - are moving here because there is a cool factor (to Portlands formerly? blue collar laid back vibe)- is erroneous--

I was saying that theres a real life factor to the influx -- the COL being lower in comparison to much of CA, and just other mundane things that cause people to move(life, actually) not just people looking on a map for "cool " places to move to/ how often does that really happen anyway, except for that small window of time people are graduating school or leaving home on their own for the first time....
And yes there is an actual Taqueria on the corner (catty corner from Tortlandia on Foster) which has actual latino owners and workers (my partner had trouble explaining his order to them, d/t their poor English- and his poor Spanish skills/ ironic considering he spent 2 years in central america)...

the pool comment was about getting out there in your hood, checking in with the people around you to take the cultural temperature of your community-

I think that our perception of our neighborhood as friendly is because we are good neighbors- keep our sidewalks clean, the lawn and garden tidy, and are generally conscious and our neighbors are appreciative...
I had to think about the culture comment and that is why I had to think of the SF culture I grew up in and how it's changed. SF, like Portland, wasn't always super liberal and accepting but tolerant. It's tolerance is why so many social movements took hold in SF and Oakland. SF has been Democrat but also pretty Catholic and that means people vote a certain way but what goes in on the family is different. A lot of old time San Franciscans aren't thrilled that SF has become known as a gay Mecca, for example. The funny thing is that the new gay transplants tend to very white, upper middle class and vanilla. So different from the movement my parents were a part of in the 70's. So many young gay transplants have less community in SF than in NYC, for example. So the gentrification of SF has ruined many communities in SF. Thank God the Chinese in Chinatown will never sell to hipsters or techie bros. The techies already took over The Mission. I knew when I came home from NYC in 1997, I guess, and I met friends in The Mission for a Hong Kong action flick, and I saw about 6-20 blondes with the same black Prada backpacks(they were real as my friend worked for Saks), I knew SF was doomed. I heard them talk and yup, Bostonians who recently graduated. Noe Valley used to have lesbians of all ethnicities. Now. Techie people who take a bus to SV then come back to NV to eat at Whole Foods. I am not sure if the lesbians live in Oakland anymore. I think that's why Portland is the next stop. Don't get me started on The Marina. Used to be old ladies mixed with yuppies in the early 80's. They were "The Big Chill" kind of yuppies though, so tolerable. Now, like every NYC neighborhood that is so easy to hate. The amazing times I had in SF is a thing of the past because the people who made the city unique are being replaced by people who never knew it's greatness and frankly, don't care. I see this happening to parts of Portland and it's sad. There are still parts of The Bay Area that feel like home but I don't want to jinx myself by saying anything. WA County actually feels like those parts of The Bay Area to me and that's why I am slowly falling in love with this area.
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Old 11-03-2016, 04:31 AM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,695 posts, read 27,069,963 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yankeemama View Post
I had to think about the culture comment and that is why I had to think of the SF culture I grew up in and how it's changed. SF, like Portland, wasn't always super liberal and accepting but tolerant. It's tolerance is why so many social movements took hold in SF and Oakland. SF has been Democrat but also pretty Catholic and that means people vote a certain way but what goes in on the family is different. A lot of old time San Franciscans aren't thrilled that SF has become known as a gay Mecca, for example. The funny thing is that the new gay transplants tend to very white, upper middle class and vanilla. So different from the movement my parents were a part of in the 70's. So many young gay transplants have less community in SF than in NYC, for example. So the gentrification of SF has ruined many communities in SF. Thank God the Chinese in Chinatown will never sell to hipsters or techie bros. The techies already took over The Mission. I knew when I came home from NYC in 1997, I guess, and I met friends in The Mission for a Hong Kong action flick, and I saw about 6-20 blondes with the same black Prada backpacks(they were real as my friend worked for Saks), I knew SF was doomed. I heard them talk and yup, Bostonians who recently graduated. Noe Valley used to have lesbians of all ethnicities. Now. Techie people who take a bus to SV then come back to NV to eat at Whole Foods. I am not sure if the lesbians live in Oakland anymore. I think that's why Portland is the next stop. Don't get me started on The Marina. Used to be old ladies mixed with yuppies in the early 80's. They were "The Big Chill" kind of yuppies though, so tolerable. Now, like every NYC neighborhood that is so easy to hate. The amazing times I had in SF is a thing of the past because the people who made the city unique are being replaced by people who never knew it's greatness and frankly, don't care. I see this happening to parts of Portland and it's sad. There are still parts of The Bay Area that feel like home but I don't want to jinx myself by saying anything. WA County actually feels like those parts of The Bay Area to me and that's why I am slowly falling in love with this area.
That sounds a lot like many of the changes I saw in Portland over the decades. I think it's pattern many cities have/are experiencing.
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Old 11-11-2016, 03:20 PM
 
Location: CA, OR & WA (Best Coast)
462 posts, read 459,678 times
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Pretty much says California is unaffordable, but we all know that, that's why we are moving here in droves.

The 20 Least Affordable Places To Live In The U.S. | Forbes
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Old 11-11-2016, 03:52 PM
 
3,939 posts, read 4,627,436 times
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Originally Posted by cyberous View Post
Pretty much says California is unaffordable, but we all know that, that's why we are moving here in droves.

The 20 Least Affordable Places To Live In The U.S. | Forbes
When are you coming?
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Old 11-11-2016, 04:41 PM
 
Location: CA, OR & WA (Best Coast)
462 posts, read 459,678 times
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I cashed out two years ago. Vancouver made more sense for me due to tax reasons. I do have quite a few friends looking to do the same. The water situation is not helping either.
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Old 11-11-2016, 04:44 PM
 
3,939 posts, read 4,627,436 times
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Originally Posted by cyberous View Post
I cashed out two years ago. Vancouver made more sense for me due to tax reasons. I do have quite a few friends looking to do the same. The water situation is not helping either.
Hope you are liking the Portland metro.😎
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