U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Oregon > Portland
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-11-2018, 12:48 AM
 
Location: Chicago
31 posts, read 21,202 times
Reputation: 123

Advertisements

I have lived in Portland before (Alphabet District) and Seattle (Capital Hill), but never lived in Chicago. Rent in trendy areas of Portland and Chicago seem similar from looking at online listings and buying a condo seems much more expensive in Portland from Redfin listings. I work in Accounting and can transfer to either of these cities. I would prefer Seattle over Portland, but currently Portland is the only option from my company for transfer in PNW. Plus Seattle COL is too close to coastal California nowadays. My friends who are still in Portland tell me that the city have changed a lot since I left in 2013 and is overrated now and traffic is unbearable. The positives they say is that the job market is better. My fear is that there might be housing bubble in Portland and once the Portlandia trend dies out and Silicon Valley tech slows, the economy and housing could crash.

Anymore with experience living in Portland and Chicago? My salary would probably be same in both places, but I am sure if I were to switch job I would have much more options in Chicago for my field. Is the winter weather in Chicago much colder but less gloomy?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-11-2018, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
10,184 posts, read 17,107,066 times
Reputation: 6753
I think that Chicago would offer you more career options than Portland.

IMHO our employment base is built on the success of a handful of large employers, if any of those corporations do a RIF Portland's employment base would have a much greater impact than would Chicago. RIFs usually impact engineers, design professionals and administrative support employees. I don't recall finance professionals laid off in a RIF.

I agree that housing in Portland is bubbly, particularly in close-in west side neighborhoods. I haven't looked at the ratio of average housing sale cost vs average family income but once that gets to be more than 6 then buyers are headed for grief if there is any disruption in their finances. (that raw data could likely be found in the census bureau's website) Increases in mortgage interest rates will also slow things down.

The primary change in Portland metro over the last 5 years is traffic related to population growth and homeless camping all around the city. I don't know if Chicago is having the same issues.

Really your bottom line should be where are your professional and personal relationships.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2018, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,697 posts, read 24,243,362 times
Reputation: 35566
I’ve lived in both. If you just want to talk about winter weather the difference is night and day. Chicago winters are freezing and snowy. Days and days of it. But they are often sunny as well. Portland winters are mild, rainy and overcast. You don’t see the sun very often. Occasionally Portland gets a big snow storm but it doesn’t stick around for long. Summers in Chicago are hot and humid. Summers in Portland usually aren’t but the past few I’ve been told, I no longer live there, have been a bit more hot than normal.

Weather is really a matter of personal preference and tolerance. Of course there are many more options in Chicago because it’s a much bigger city but large size is precisely the reason why some people prefer a smaller place. You just have to decide what you are specifically looking for.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2018, 11:32 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
23,805 posts, read 41,468,835 times
Reputation: 25684
If Portland, plan to live close to work and rent. As a finance person.... You can invest your RE dollars in another area of USA and get enough positive cash flows to support your Portland rental expense.

During my earning yrs.... income tax free Vancouver WA, with lower costs and equivalent higher west coast wages kept me close enough to Oregon to enjoy, rather than deal with the difficult issues... 5 minutes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2018, 12:44 PM
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,624 posts, read 15,804,829 times
Reputation: 10135
Depends on where you are in life. Under 40, no kids, I'd probably pick Chicago to live the city life for a bit, until I got tired of the hustle (but that is just me). It is one of the great cities, with all the attendant pluses and minuses, but there are certainly things you can access in Chicago that you won't get in the PNW. If you are career-oriented, as far as going up the ladder, the bigger the city the more the opportunities.

On the other hand, if center-city life and city amenities are not your thing and you'd prefer a quieter suburb or edge-of-city house and access to the mountains and coast, I'd pick the PNW. The PNW is far more "work to live" not the other way 'round.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2018, 01:22 PM
 
3,939 posts, read 3,993,300 times
Reputation: 3049
I would choose Chicago over Portland if I were in the OP’s situation. Oregon was my family’s choice because we wanted to be near our families in SF and NorCal so Portland checked our boxes for our needs. Now that we have been here eight years we have found it to be a wonderful place for our kids. If one is moving for career with no kids and can handle the cold... then Chicago sounds wise and FUN! My hubby has some Chicago connections and loves the city and people but can’t take the cold. Boo.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2018, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,697 posts, read 24,243,362 times
Reputation: 35566
OP you mentioned “The Portlandia Trend.” I really don’t think that so much ever existed entirely except on TV. It sort of encompassed a kind of trendy sort of an offbeat area that could be found in many cities like Chicago’s Old Town as an example which has existed for decades. Trust me though, except for maybe a few fun touristy blocks in some neighborhoods here and there it isn’t pervasive all throughout Portland.

Both cities have neighborhoods where young professionals like to live. You will find more of a choice in Chicago for variying budgets and activities. There will be more nightlife and opportunities to socialize if that’s your thing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2018, 03:26 PM
 
29 posts, read 26,975 times
Reputation: 25
I'm a native Chicagoan in my 30s who was relocated to N.E. Oregon for work a few years ago. I've since been relocated near PA for work, but often wonder what would have happened if I'd declined the offer and stayed in Oregon. Granted, I was a 3.5 hour drive from Portland, but throughout my travels over the state (including time in Portland and WA) I felt a definite sense of real calm.
Being who I am, I would opt for Portland hands down.
Perhaps I'm jaded and embittered by a few too many sh*tty Chicago experiences...Fewer people overall, activities and events that are the same caliber as Chicago, much milder winters and a less than 2 hour drive from the ocean all equal no-brainer to me, but of course it all depends on your personal values.
I am curious about poster PNW-type-gal's comment that "...there are certainly things you can access in Chicago that you won't get in the PNW". Maybe where I lived as I mentioned, which was 3.5 hours east, but in the PDX area I don't see what that could be.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-12-2018, 02:36 PM
 
927 posts, read 1,128,048 times
Reputation: 2119
Quote:
Originally Posted by CityPlanning View Post
My salary would probably be same in both places, but I am sure if I were to switch job I would have much more options in Chicago for my field.
If you are certain about this, then perhaps you should let this be the key deciding factor, at least for now.

Quote:
Is the winter weather in Chicago much colder but less gloomy?
Yes and yes.

I hate Chicago, and like the greater Portland metro area very much, so for me it's not even a question; I'd do whatever it took to stay in the Pacific Northwest, be it Portland, Bend, Seattle, Tacoma, Vancouver, etc. Chicago weather sucks terribly (damn freezing in winter and humid as F in the summer). Whereas in the PNW, the spring, summer, fall are among the best in the United States (moderate temps, no humidity, few biting insects). Pacific Northwest winters are very mild west of the mountains due to the moderating effects of the Pacific Ocean; it very rarely snows west of the mountains. Also, food all around is much better in the PNW (and frankly better than most of the rest of the country). Much prefer the people up here too.

Illinois is a political disaster, and it will be a miracle if Chicago doesn't declare bankruptcy at some point. People are fleeing Chicago's home state, so keep that in mind. Bottom line, there's a reason it costs significantly more to live on the West coast versus the rest of the United States.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-12-2018, 03:19 PM
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,624 posts, read 15,804,829 times
Reputation: 10135
Quote:
Originally Posted by UberDuper View Post
I am curious about poster PNW-type-gal's comment that "...there are certainly things you can access in Chicago that you won't get in the PNW". Maybe where I lived as I mentioned, which was 3.5 hours east, but in the PDX area I don't see what that could be.
Museums, theater, nightlife, a larger selection of restaurants - all the big city things. Sure, there is some of that in Portland, but nowhere near the same scale. But if someone is not particularly attracted by those things, prefers the outdoors, then most of the PNW would be a better choice. Also the job situation is better in a larger place, just out of sheer numbers.

I don't actually want to live in a big city (heck, Portland got too big and crowded for me) but I like visiting them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Oregon > Portland
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top