U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Oregon > Portland
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-11-2019, 09:40 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
31,582 posts, read 52,034,546 times
Reputation: 40316

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jane M View Post
Thank you for the suggestions! I will check them out.

Sam812, I am sorry you had to leave the business. I will definitely investigate vendor rules. So sad that people are able to do that.
Vancouver, WA Farmer's Market has the policy that vendors must produce their own goods, at a local site which is audited by a leadership committee (composed of growers and vendors) that runs the market and approves vendors. https://www.vancouverfarmersmarket.com/vision.php

It is always a good idea to know what you are buying (and consuming).

I have found Portland area Markets to be quite rigorous and with credible vendors.

Temporary roadside stands, vehicles next to Costco / similar with folding table set up for a few hours... staffed by someone who knows nothing about the grower - Buyer Beware (But there are legitimate stands).

As a grower... the fees to sell and advertise are quite burdensome. + you are spending an entire day away from your farm (which has needs 24x7). Thus those growers who come, are making a big commitment.

Enjoy the season.

If you are price sensitive (cash constrained), look to local 'gleaner' groups.
http://urbangleaners.org/
Gleaners of Clackamas County - Home
https://www.tualatinvalleygleaners.org/
Edible Portland | Picked Clean
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-11-2019, 09:56 PM
 
1,939 posts, read 988,546 times
Reputation: 4183
Quote:
Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
There are no government subsidies for cherries. The price supports are mostly for commodity crops like corn, wheat, and soybeans.

What is probably happening is some groceries are selling highly visible seasonal items like cherries as a loss leader to get you into the store whereas the small producer at the farmer's market actually has to earn a living with the produce in front of them.
I honestly have no idea about cherries in Oregon. As a former commercial produce grower I can 100% guarantee large produce growers do get government subsidies. All the big grower seminars have classes specifically showing new produce growers how to sign up for them. There is no way possible to be a large produce grower without them.

Have you ever seen those cool green rooftop gardens, they are only possible because of subsidies.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-12-2019, 01:07 PM
 
347 posts, read 386,237 times
Reputation: 713
Stealth Rabbit and sam812 thank you so much for your perspectives as produce growers. As a dietetic professional, I am disturbed over how certain foods are subsidized and think that all consumers should be made aware of where their food is coming from. As a consumer, I am very disappointed in the produce offerings in stores. I'd rather eat food grown in somebody's back yard (as PDXmike mentioned) than the crap they sell at the grocery store. (although, sometimes stores do have local produce). Also, thanks for the gleaning resources, Stealth.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-12-2019, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Just outside of Portland
4,828 posts, read 7,042,867 times
Reputation: 5105
I called "UrbanGleaners" once because I had apple trees just flowing with nice big juicy bug free apples.

I was told to wash, wrap, and box them, then they would accept them.

This was many years ago, but it spoiled the experience for me, that now I just let them rot on the ground or put them in my yard debris recycling.

May not be that way now, but I don't care to find out, because it was too much trouble when I tried to do a good thing.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-13-2019, 10:40 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
30,929 posts, read 42,544,664 times
Reputation: 71710
Growing season is short and it stars late., so there will be very little local produce until the end of summer.



Strawberries are early (late May June), local cherries will be in July, peaches and plums are August, and apples not until October November. Fruit ripens pretty much all at the same time and then it is gone.


You might be able to find lettuce and greens out of season if they are greenhouse grown. Tomatoes won't be until August or September. Maybe there will be local corn at the end of summer. Watermelons, if they are "local" will be trucked in from Hermiston, otherwise, they are probably from Mexico.


You will know when watermelons are from Hermiston because there will be a great big sign that says "Hermiston melons" and you will pay a premium price for them.


With such short growing season, it would be impossible to keep a farmers market open with only locally grown produce. In fact, the farmers market in Bend would not allow local farmer to purchase a table because they couldn't keep it stocked with local produce. Vendors there are from out of the area, hauling in produce from out of the area.


If you watch for it, you can get some really nice local Marion berries. The season doesn't last long.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-13-2019, 11:59 AM
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,786 posts, read 17,877,295 times
Reputation: 10744
The growing season is not that short (168 days where I am, 220 in Portland) and there are a lot of crops that can be planted before the start of the growing season if sheltered. Our farmer's market starts March 1 and there are a lot of cool weather or overwinter crops (various green, carrots, potatoes, winter squash, root vegetables and other over-wintered crops) even at the opening day - plus there are some hydroponic farms so you can still get some of the crops associated with summer.

Most farmer's markets have a rule about the percentage of stalls which must be produce and that percentage often changes by the month.

I buy what I can from the farmer's market, even though it is more expensive, simply because it is almost always better quality. My bag of mixed salad greens from the farmer's market lasts 2 weeks or more, where as the bagged things from the grocery store last a couple of days at most. The local farm stand that has corn and melons opens today and when you buy from them you get something picked that morning, instead of a week or more ago. For things like corn, that makes a HUGE difference. I love cantaloupe, but I hate buying the unripe, still-crunchy cantaloupe that most all grocery chains sell.
__________________
Moderator posts are in RED.
Moderator for: Oregon (and subforums), Auto Racing.
When you signed up for an account, you agreed to abide by the site's TOS and rules. You really should look through them.
City-Data Terms of Service: http://www.city-data.com/terms.html
City-Data FAQ: http://www.city-data.com/forum/faq/
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-13-2019, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Was Midvalley Oregon; Now Eastside Seattle area
11,640 posts, read 5,782,970 times
Reputation: 8567
Is try farmers stands. Farmer markets are sometimes very expensive to staff. We only sold at the farm. Later when we pulled the trees, I would drive out to friends, farmers market in Salem on Rural st. or upick. I want file fruit!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-13-2019, 02:14 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
31,582 posts, read 52,034,546 times
Reputation: 40316
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jane M View Post
. As a dietetic professional, I am disturbed over how certain foods are subsidized and think that all consumers should be made aware of where their food is coming from. As a consumer, I am very disappointed in the produce offerings in stores. I'd rather eat food grown in somebody's back yard (as PDXmike mentioned) than the crap they sell at the grocery store. (although, sometimes stores do have local produce).
Your expertise would be appreciated in the local 'food security networks" where we train consumers in diet, purchase, and food preparation. As homeschoolers our kids had to know the nutrition and serving costs of each meal. While living in Europe and Asia, kids did the daily shopping at fresh markets. Good for language, currency, bartering, budgeting, and business skills.

As a small grower I can assure you we got NO subsidy. And our cherries were $0.20 / lb. We sold 5,000lbs / yr. Pears $0.18. / Apples, $0.20, Raspberries $0.65. (u-pick). Chicken eggs were the highest revenue, but very tough to be profitable. Kids handled the farm sales / expenses as part of schooling. / 4H.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-13-2019, 03:03 PM
 
1,939 posts, read 988,546 times
Reputation: 4183
Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
Your expertise would be appreciated in the local 'food security networks" where we train consumers in diet, purchase, and food preparation. As homeschoolers our kids had to know the nutrition and serving costs of each meal. While living in Europe and Asia, kids did the daily shopping at fresh markets. Good for language, currency, bartering, budgeting, and business skills.

As a small grower I can assure you we got NO subsidy. And our cherries were $0.20 / lb. We sold 5,000lbs / yr. Pears $0.18. / Apples, $0.20, Raspberries $0.65. (u-pick). Chicken eggs were the highest revenue, but very tough to be profitable. Kids handled the farm sales / expenses as part of schooling. / 4H.
You should honestly check into subsidies. It is NOT a handout. I struggled with it myself and chose to close down instead, I regret that decision. Do you go to any of the bigger grower seminars, many of them can help you with what programs are available in your areas.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-13-2019, 03:28 PM
 
Location: SNA=>PDX 2013
2,793 posts, read 3,841,924 times
Reputation: 3300
Also, look for local farmstands. I know when I lived in Lake Oswego, Parsons Farms had a stand that was there most of the year and there typically daily or a few times a week (which was nice so I could do other things on the weekend). I've seen a couple in Hillsboro. I have to think there's more out there.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Oregon > Portland
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:53 AM.

© 2005-2023, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top