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Old 01-08-2020, 07:45 PM
 
Location: SNA=>PDX 2013
2,793 posts, read 3,793,450 times
Reputation: 3300

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lapaki View Post
I’ve never understood this phenomenon. I live in Beaverton and work in downtown Portland, something I’ve been doing since 2002. I used to work from 8 to 5, but the traffic got worse each year. My job has flexible hours, so I began shifting my shift earlier and earlier to beat the morning rush. The “sweet spot” keeps moving earlier and earlier. I currently work from 6:30 to 3:30, which means I leave at 6 AM. The morning commute is smooth sailing, even with school buses, and takes me about 30 minutes. The afternoon commute takes me between 45 and 55 minutes. That tells me that a lot of people must go in late and leave early. It can’t be due to afternoon school traffic, because it doesn’t get any better during the summer.

I've been wondering if it's due to more people working from home (WFH) or flexing their hours. Part of my team works half their week from home and can flex their hours to avoid traffic. most of them get in early, go home early, and work from home to finish their day. One WFH in the morning, comes in late, leaves early, and WFH in the PM. Who knows. There's just more people here in general too.
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Old 01-11-2020, 07:46 PM
 
Location: West Coast
176 posts, read 117,047 times
Reputation: 200
Patterns of Portland traffic inscrutable are. I gave up on deducing general rules, so I would agree with a poster who suggested gathering your own stats at the times of interest using Google Maps.

What I do every time is to fire up my Google Maps for each trip outside the neighborhood, just to make sure there isn't an unexpected slowdown somewhere. Last time I failed to do so, I ended up in a claustrophobic jam on I-5 South south of the I-405 junction, possibly the longest no-exit stretch of highway within city limits. It was on a Sunday night, of all times, due to some road work.

This said, here are some observed paradoxes of Portland traffic:
- I never cease to be amazed how early folks take off from work here. Based on traffic, one would presume that people end their work day at 2. How it is possible, I know not.
- I-5 North is reliably very bad in the afternoon northbound from about Terwilliger and southbound from about OR-217. Why on earth is this asymmetric? As in, traffic is terrible in the afternoon in all directions, but not so terrible in the morning in any direction?
- Same asymmetry with US-26: horrible eastbound in the afternoon, but bearable westbound in the morning.
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Old 01-12-2020, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Louisville, KY
126 posts, read 88,907 times
Reputation: 283
My theory is that, due to some sort of quantum physics anomaly, more people leave work each afternoon than go to work each morning.
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Old 01-12-2020, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
15,293 posts, read 16,229,724 times
Reputation: 25163
Has Portland finished all the road repairs, ramp remodels and bridge repairs? Last summer, ODOT had traffic alerts out to avoid any state highway or freeway routes through Portland unless absolutely necessary, because of all the construction work.
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Old 03-31-2020, 10:47 PM
 
Location: 89434
6,646 posts, read 4,369,522 times
Reputation: 4791
I-5 is very congested between the Columbia River Bridge and the I-405 interchange (after crossing the Willamette River)

They need to tear down that whole I-5 corridor and rebuild it. Make it wider and modernize it a little.
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Old 04-01-2020, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
10,949 posts, read 19,349,918 times
Reputation: 8088
Do not take the St. John's Bridge except mid-day and mid-night. The back up is mindblowing.
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Old 04-01-2020, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
1,428 posts, read 2,278,133 times
Reputation: 1960
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevroqs View Post
I-5 is very congested between the Columbia River Bridge and the I-405 interchange (after crossing the Willamette River)

They need to tear down that whole I-5 corridor and rebuild it. Make it wider and modernize it a little.

They need a true bypass to take all the trucks off the city center. They've been talking about a bypass for 5 decades, but since this is Portland, nothing EVER gets done....
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Old 04-01-2020, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Portland Metro
2,317 posts, read 4,363,110 times
Reputation: 2770
Quote:
Originally Posted by timfountain View Post
They need a true bypass to take all the trucks off the city center. They've been talking about a bypass for 5 decades, but since this is Portland, nothing EVER gets done....
The one thing I've never quite figured out is the resistance to the Westside Bypass. There's a whole CD thread about it here: Westside Bypass: Genius or Madness?

Many of the complaints about it is that it would increase sprawl. But much of the bypass would go through exclusive farm use zones, and unless those parcels that are outside of the urban growth boundary were subsumed into the UGB, there's no reason that the lands couldn't stay as farms, preventing residential and commercial sprawl. Or at least delaying it. Yes, the land would be expensive, and a new bridge over the Columbia (and for that matter over the Willamette south of Wilsonville) would also be expensive, and cutting through/over the West Hills would probably also come at a large cost. But from a long-term view wouldn't it be a more viable option than a complete re-vamp of I-5 right through downtown or an addition of lanes to I-205? Both of those, by the way, would require some expensive land acquisitions as well.

The complaints have always seemed to me to be a thinly-veiled anti-car position presented as a more widely appealing anti-sprawl position.
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Old 04-02-2020, 06:51 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
1,428 posts, read 2,278,133 times
Reputation: 1960
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjpop View Post
The one thing I've never quite figured out is the resistance to the Westside Bypass. There's a whole CD thread about it here: //www.city-data.com/forum/portland/1737559-westside-bypass-genius-madness.html

Many of the complaints about it is that it would increase sprawl. But much of the bypass would go through exclusive farm use zones, and unless those parcels that are outside of the urban growth boundary were subsumed into the UGB, there's no reason that the lands couldn't stay as farms, preventing residential and commercial sprawl. Or at least delaying it. Yes, the land would be expensive, and a new bridge over the Columbia (and for that matter over the Willamette south of Wilsonville) would also be expensive, and cutting through/over the West Hills would probably also come at a large cost. But from a long-term view wouldn't it be a more viable option than a complete re-vamp of I-5 right through downtown or an addition of lanes to I-205? Both of those, by the way, would require some expensive land acquisitions as well.

The complaints have always seemed to me to be a thinly-veiled anti-car position presented as a more widely appealing anti-sprawl position.

Totally agree, and in the meantime the UGB keeps being moved out. I think the goal is to grow the UGB to a position where there is no possibility of a WBP. Also agree on the I5 through downtown re-work that is being discussed. I won't even get into the ridiculous discussion and genuflection taking place on the redress issues for historically black neighborhoods displaced decades ago by the then-new I5 build. Get over it. They are talking about $700M for a bit of fiddling with I5. But my understanding is that a full-on interstate new-build runs about $1B per mile, excluding the needed bridges, so a WBP is a very costly proposition compared to a bodge-it I5 do-nothing band-aid currently being discussed.



Finally I don't think it is a thinly veiled anti-car position, the current nutjobs in the city council are full-on rabid anti-vehicle bigots. I once heard an interview with transportation commissioner Chloe Eudaly on OPB where she said that the goal of the transportation committee was "To force people out of their cars and onto public transport". Yes she used the words force.... I finally understood there is no balance or middle ground in their thinking and actions.... Yes she lost her father to a car crash, but IMHO that makes her very far from the ideal person to be impartial and fair when it comes to transportation issues, so it makes total sense that she is the Portland transportation commissioner!!!! Your really couldn't make this stuff up... This was particularly galling as I was sitting in a nose-to-tail traffic jam on I84 at 2:00PM on a Wednesday afternoon.
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Old 04-04-2020, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
9,859 posts, read 11,261,191 times
Reputation: 10014
Traffic? Bypasses? UGB? WBP? I had to check the dates of recent posts to be sure they were actually written this week. I haven't actually seen anything called 'traffic' in at least two weeks.The undeniable improvement in the quality of air quality, ETA's, and personal safety for non-drivers and drivers alike, 'should' inform an opinion that returning to a car centric paradigm would be a step backward. No? Yes, absolutely. If I were the Portland traffic commissioner, no non-essential vehicle traffic would get into the city centers on either side of the Willamette going forward. But why don't we wait and see if there is even a Portland left after the lockdown is extended into mid-July. We might be working ourselves into a lather over the wrong catastrophe ...
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