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Old 12-06-2017, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,817 posts, read 39,346,783 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lbjen View Post

Itís also important for people to realize that autism isnít always the worst thing that can happen to your child.

Absolutely.

As with any spectrum disorder, there is obviously a wide range of severity and impact, and I've certainly worked with families where behavior related to a child's autism was a major catalyst, regarding deep dysfunctionality within the family. There are definitely families who are in huge crisis because they are dealing with all the fallout that comes with raising a severely disabled child. But this isn't all autism, as you note. And, as genetic predispositions go, so many come with shortened lifespans, comorbid complex physiological conditions, health issues that demand intensive medical care...by comparison, mild autistic traits may well be less of a burden to bear, from a familial standpoint. But it's all relative.
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Old 12-06-2017, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,483 posts, read 26,089,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newtovenice View Post
Because there obviously is.

It didn't exist 100 years ago.

Now it does and it's rates are increasing exponentially in the US, specifically. SOMETHING is causing it. SOMETHING has changed to CAUSE it. Otherwise kids wouldn't be autistic today, just like they weren't 100 years ago.

it's really not hard to understand that .. unless you're a paid pharma shill who will defend any medical intervention known to man and ignore basic common sense.
The fact that autism was not labeled until Kanner and Asperger did so does not mean it never existed before then. It certainly did.

Many historical figures, including Mozart and Isaac Newton, demonstrated traits we would associate with autism today.

My husband's best childhood friend clearly has high functioning autism, and he is in his mid 70s.

Rates are changing primarily because the diagnostic criteria have been widened and doctors look for it. Kids that would have been labeled "mentally retarded" in the past are placed on the autism spectrum now. Previously they were not even counted. Only recently has there been any concerted effort to help people with autism, and the diagnosis facilitates access to specialized services.

Growing Autism Cases Only Reflects More Diagnosis, Study Says | Time
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Old 12-06-2017, 03:59 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,817 posts, read 39,346,783 times
Reputation: 48613
Quote:
Originally Posted by newtovenice View Post
Because there obviously is.

It didn't exist 100 years ago.
Patently untrue.

The contemporary diagnostic terminology didn't exist.

The neurobiological evidence and research didn't exist.

The behavioral manifestations certainly did. Just because you don't have a name (or an accurate name) for something doesn't mean it doesn't exist. People with extra copies of the 21st chromosome existed, obviously, well before English physician John Langdon Down first described Down syndrome in 1862. It didn't start, then. It just received diagnostic verbiage at that point. Artifacts that appear to reference people with Trisomy 21 date back to AD 500.

Saying, "100 years ago, nobody was recognized as having autism," doesn't mean that individuals exhibiting behavioral symptoms consistent with what is now recognized as autism didn't exist. Terms like "idiot" and "cretin" were applied liberally to various manners of disability that are, in present time, known to be individual medical and developmental conditions. Traits consistent with autism were absolutely present then and earlier.

From https://www.smithsonianmag.com/scien...ica-180957684/ , entitled, "The Early History of Autism in America: A surprising new historical analysis suggests that a pioneering doctor was examining people with autism before the Civil War" :



Quote:
Originally Posted by Above-referenced article from Smithsonian
"Billy was 59 years old that spring or summer of 1846, when a well-dressed man from Boston rode into his Massachusetts village on horseback, and began measuring and testing him in all sorts of ways. The visitor, as we imagine the scene, placed phrenologist’s calipers on his skull, ran a tape measure around his chest and asked many questions relating to Billy’s odder behaviors. It was those behaviors that had prompted this encounter. In the parlance of the mid-19th century, Billy was an “idiot,” a label that doctors and educators used not with malice but with reference to a concept that owned a place in the medical dictionaries and encompassed what most of us today call, with more deliberate sensitivity, intellectual disability.

In Billy’s case, however, the man who examined him soon realized that no commonly accepted definition of intellectual impairment quite fit this particular subject. Although Billy was clearly not “normal,” and was considered by his family and neighbors to be intellectually incapacitated, in some ways he demonstrated solid, if not superior, cognition. His ability to use spoken language was severely limited, but he had perfect musical pitch and knew more than 200 tunes. Billy was not the only person whose combination of skills and strengths puzzled the examiners. As the leader of the commission would acknowledge, there were “a great many cases” seen in the course of the survey about which it was “difficult to say whether...the person should be called an idiot.”

But what diagnosis might have fit better? If Billy were alive today, we think his disability, and that of others documented then in Massachusetts, would likely be diagnosed as autism."
Quote:
Now it does and it's rates are increasing exponentially in the US, specifically. SOMETHING is causing it. SOMETHING has changed to CAUSE it. Otherwise kids wouldn't be autistic today, just like they weren't 100 years ago.
Again, the behavior assuredly was evidenced 100 years ago...and earlier.

Quote:
it's really not hard to understand that .. unless you're a paid pharma shill who will defend any medical intervention known to man and ignore basic common sense.
Eh. The vast majority of successful, evidence-based autism interventions are behaviorally-based, not pharmacological. Big pharma shills don't have a large stake in "curing" autism.
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Old 12-06-2017, 06:44 PM
 
4,779 posts, read 1,542,522 times
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You are absolutely right.

100 years ago 1 out of 50 of US kids had major developmental, speech, and communication problems. They didn't sleep. They had tremendous foods and gut issues.

Their parents just. didn't. notice. Good god. Do you people really believe this? I mean, do you REALLY believe that?

/FACEPALM/
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Old 12-06-2017, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,817 posts, read 39,346,783 times
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Who said nobody noticed?
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Old 12-06-2017, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Middle America
35,817 posts, read 39,346,783 times
Reputation: 48613
I'm gonna go out on a limb and guess that you didn't read the Smithsonian article linked above.

I'm also gonna go out on a limb and guess that you have your reasons for ignoring the reality that many, many people with autism spectrum disorders DON'T, in fact, have major developmental delays, "tremendous food and gut issues," sleep pattern disturbance, etc.

The diagnostic criteria for ASDs are:

-Pervasive social skill and verbal/nonverbal communicative deficits (which exist in a huge range)
-Restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities
-Symptoms present early on in development
-Symptoms cause clinically significant barriers to functioning
-Symptoms can't be better explained by intellectual disability or global developmental delay

You don't have to have major developmental delays outside of verbal communication development, you don't have to have digestive issues, sleep issues, etc. if you have an autism spectrum disorder.

You appear to have a very specific (and limited) mental picture of what someone with autism "looks" like.

Prior to in-depth research breakthroughs on autism spectrum disorders, prior to neurobiologial advancements, back in the good ol' days when people with these symptoms were just considered "not right," "retarded," "off," "can't behave," "mute," "has fits," etc., no, I don't imagine that parents and others just "didn't notice anything was wrong." They just didn't have the benefit of years of neurological and behavioral research to help them understand the root of the deficits. They chalked it up to other disorders, or just left it as the individual being "special,' or "slow," or "difficult," or some other vague descriptor.
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Old 12-06-2017, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,483 posts, read 26,089,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newtovenice View Post
You are absolutely right.

100 years ago 1 out of 50 of US kids had major developmental, speech, and communication problems. They didn't sleep. They had tremendous foods and gut issues.

Their parents just. didn't. notice. Good god. Do you people really believe this? I mean, do you REALLY believe that?

/FACEPALM/
It was common enough for there to be a category for "idiot" on some Federal census forms.

What is an "idiot" in the Census? - Genealogy.com

"Enumerators ... were also given a specific definition for the term 'idiot.' An idiot was 'a person the development of whose mental faculties were arrested in infancy or childhood before coming to maturity.' "

By the way, autism has a spectrum of severity. Not all people with autism have "major developmental, speech, and communication problems" or don't sleep or have "tremendous foods and gut issues."

https://www.carautismroadmap.org/int...ility-and-asd/

"As of the most recent prevalence study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), which studied records from 2008, 38% of children with ASD had Intellectual Disability. (24% of children with ASD were considered in the borderline range in terms of intellectual ability Ė an IQ of 71Ė85; 38% had IQ scores over 85, considered average or above average.)"

The current prevalence is not 1 out of 50, either.

You might find the comments here illuminating.

http://wrongplanet.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=234862

As the last poster in that thread notes, it has only been recently that children with severe autism were not mostly institutionalized.
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Old 12-07-2017, 06:51 AM
 
4,779 posts, read 1,542,522 times
Reputation: 7846
Quote:
Originally Posted by suzy_q2010 View Post
It was common enough for there to be a category for "idiot" on some Federal census forms.

What is an "idiot" in the Census? - Genealogy.com

"Enumerators ... were also given a specific definition for the term 'idiot.' An idiot was 'a person the development of whose mental faculties were arrested in infancy or childhood before coming to maturity.' "

By the way, autism has a spectrum of severity. Not all people with autism have "major developmental, speech, and communication problems" or don't sleep or have "tremendous foods and gut issues."

https://www.carautismroadmap.org/int...ility-and-asd/

"As of the most recent prevalence study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), which studied records from 2008, 38% of children with ASD had Intellectual Disability. (24% of children with ASD were considered in the borderline range in terms of intellectual ability Ė an IQ of 71Ė85; 38% had IQ scores over 85, considered average or above average.)"

The current prevalence is not 1 out of 50, either.

You might find the comments here illuminating.

http://wrongplanet.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=234862

As the last poster in that thread notes, it has only been recently that children with severe autism were not mostly institutionalized.
How many "idiot children" where there in 1917?

What is the current prevalence in the US?

And what is the prediction for the next 20 years? Is autism predicted to increase or decrease? Explain why it is predicted to increase.

Did obesity suddenly skyrocket in the 2000s because everyone had scales and could weigh themselves daily? Kind like autism rates because suddenly it was *recognized* and *measured* by *professionals*?

Or was obesity NOT problem 100 years ago and criteria for measurement NOT a factor in the fact that the population was NOT obese? Doubt you'll understand that.
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Old 12-07-2017, 07:06 AM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
39,026 posts, read 37,675,762 times
Reputation: 73631
Tabula Rasa deserves combat pay for trying to keep rational thought in this thread.

The OP has a history of starting inflammatory threads based on her quack medical theories. Keep carrying that battle flag, TR!!
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Old 12-07-2017, 07:51 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,817 posts, read 39,346,783 times
Reputation: 48613
I've worked so long with individuals with autism, I can do this in my sleep.
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