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Unread 12-21-2008, 01:21 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
1,030 posts, read 795,789 times
Reputation: 227
Quote:
Originally Posted by miasmommy View Post
I had a horrible experience with my birth. I went to the hospital after 14 hours of labor at home. I was dialated to 8. I said I felt great and was handling the pain quite well. I wanted to walk around but they said I HAD to get hooked up to monitor the baby. When I was lying down the pain got a little worse and the doctor scared me into believing I wouldn't be able to handle the pain any further "since it only gets worse." They told me that 95% of women get epidurals and that I'd be crazy NOT to get one. So I got one at 9 centimeters? I got a fever of 106 and they put me on antibiotics. The baby started moving all over moved from "head down" to breach! Which I blame on the drugs which caused the fever! So they said I needed an emergency C-section. I refused and said I wanted to push. They drugged me and did it without my consent. When I awoke, they coaxed me into signing the surgery consent form AFTER they forced me. I said I wanted to breastfeed and NOT to give my baby a botte, but they did. I did NOT sign the form allowing the Hep B vaccine, I wanted to wait, yet I find out at her first appt that they DID give it to her!

Basically, I have a healthy daughter with no damage (that I can see) but does anyone have any advice for this NOT happening the second time around?

Has anyone had a VBAC? Is it difficult? More painful? Successful?

Has anyone had a tub birth? No drugs?

Now, I lasted up to 9 centimeters with pain, but tolerable. Were they right when they said the pain gets worse?
One question: Why did you go at it for 14 hours before going to the hospital?
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Unread 12-21-2008, 06:26 AM
 
2,839 posts, read 5,949,137 times
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Nrfitchett, there's no reason to go to the hospital during a healthy pregnancy during early labor. Usually the recommendation is that you go when contractions are 5 minutes apart and strong enough that you can't talk through them, and especially in a first time mom, that can take a very long time. When I had my daughter, who was my second child, I went into labor in the late morning, went to see the doctor for my regular 40-week appointment, and he said I was dilating nicely, and could go home or to the hospital. I chose to go home, spent the day doing a little yardwork and playing with my son, DH came home, we had dinner, put our son to bed, and then headed off to the hospital. I finally had her naturally the next morning. Obviously if things had moved more quickly, we would have gone earlier, but there's no reason to be stuck in bed with a fetal monitor for hours upon hours... that's how many women end up with interventions leading to a C-section.
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Unread 12-21-2008, 11:42 AM
 
744 posts, read 763,304 times
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I'm sorry about your experience, it sounds awful. Did you deliver at Elmhurst Hospital? I usually hear good things about their L&D unit. I am glad your daughter is healthy and happy.

If you don't mind the opinion of a father of 4, and vicarious L&D NP, both thanks to my lovely wife, it was formed after listening to her sob nights after work about mothers who make careless decisions.

I would be very skeptical about delivering vaginally after having a c-section. There is a very serious risk of rupturing your uterus, and I can't imagine that would be more pleasant than your first birthing experience.

Remember that in spite of what others have told you, and will tell you, do not make decisions that make you more comfortable, make the decision that is best for the health of your baby. Birthing plans are fine, but don't ever let them interfere with the well-being of your child.

I'm sure that plenty of women mistrust hospitals, doctors, or something else in medicine, and that is fine, until something goes wrong. Doulas and midwives (please use a CNM, not a lay midwife if you must) will tell you about how wonderful and natural and beautiful their deliveries are, but I have heard for over a decade about the other stories they won't tell you. When something goes wrong, your baby will suffer for the rest of her life, if she even has that opportunity. And the consequences are severe and irreversible, anywhere from nerve damage to demise. They are not qualified or trained to intervene should anything out of the ordinary happen, and by the time the ambulance (or a terrified significant other) gets you to the hospital, it is usually always too late. I will not pretend that malpractice in hospitals doesn't happen, but at least you are in a position to save your baby's life if something does go wrong.

Some women may dismiss my view, and that's ok, it doesn't hurt my feelings. But, remember this, until recently, childbirth was the leading cause of among women. That is, giving birth without the assistance of modern medicine, which is essentially what doula or lay midwife is offering you: a former leading cause of death.

You want to give birth in a way that gives you and your baby a powerful and positive emotional experience, but I have been at my wife's side for all of her deliveries, in hospital rooms, and it was the most transcendent experience of my life. Nothing could have been more tragic than to have something unexpected go wrong and harm our children. How much more tragic if we could have prevented or mitigated it but chose not to because of an outdated philosophy. We would be responsible, not the doula or Dr, for that child's misfortune.

One last thing, don't let finances stop you from doing what is right for your baby. If my tax dollars are used to pay for the assurance of health for your baby, then I will happily pay them. If the financial burden falls on you, best of luck, but I would not be willing to put a price tag on the health of one of my children.

I hope I have offered you a different perspective, and good luck.
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Unread 12-21-2008, 12:46 PM
 
Location: chicagoland
1,636 posts, read 2,400,184 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nrfitchett4 View Post
One question: Why did you go at it for 14 hours before going to the hospital?

People go WAY too early. I didn't need to be hooked up to monitors and IVs when everything was fine. I planned drug free. I was happy at home, walkin around, I took a bath, watched a movie, ate some KFC, lol.

when a pregnancy is healthy, you don't need to be in an uncomfortable hospital setting where they are going to try and "speed things up," and make what happened to me happen.

I should have waited even longer
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Unread 12-21-2008, 12:56 PM
 
2,839 posts, read 5,949,137 times
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The reason many women died in childbirth was because hygiene and sanitation were so poor.

The uterus usually ruptures at the top. A Csection incision is at the bottom. A repeat csection is more risky for most women than a vbac. Doctors will try to convince you otherwise because sections are more convenient... but for most women (note I did not say ALL), vbacs are safer than the major surgery that a ceasarian section is.
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Unread 12-21-2008, 01:24 PM
 
744 posts, read 763,304 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beanandpumpkin View Post
The reason many women died in childbirth was because hygiene and sanitation were so poor...
Many of the deaths, currently, in third world countries are related to obstructed labour, eclampsia, severe bleeding, anaemia and infection. Since there are no statistics, we can safely assume that these are some of the same causes historically.

Quote:
Originally Posted by beanandpumpkin View Post
...The uterus usually ruptures at the top. A Csection incision is at the bottom. A repeat csection is more risky for most women than a vbac. Doctors will try to convince you otherwise because sections are more convenient... but for most women (note I did not say ALL), vbacs are safer than the major surgery that a ceasarian section is.
I'm not sure where you got this information about vbac being safer. I hope not from a message board

I do not know a single Dr who would rather do a C-section than a vaginal birth, they are certainly not more convenient. I'm sure these agenda-driven OB's are out there, but they are the exception rather than the rule.
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Unread 12-21-2008, 05:26 PM
 
2,839 posts, read 5,949,137 times
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Here is some good info on the risks of vbac vs. the risks of a repeat section:

Best Evidence: VBAC or Repeat C-Section | VBAC or Repeat C-Section :: Childbirth Connection

Here is what the WHO has to say about maternal deaths:

Quote:
As stated by the 2005 WHO report "Make Every mother and Child Count" they are: severe bleeding/hemorrhage (25%), infections (13%), unsafe abortions (13%), eclampsia (12%), obstructed labour (8%), other direct causes (8%), and indirect causes (20%). Indirect causes such as malaria, anaemia[5], HIV/AIDS and cardiovascular disease, complicate pregnancy or are aggravated by it.
Severe bleeding is often due to placenta previa or abruption (which would necessitate a c-section anyway, whether a woman had birthed vaginally or not). I don't know how many mothers bleed to death due to a vaginal birth vs. a csection, though I'd imagine the risks are greater during major abdominal surgery. Infections are often due to poor hygiene, and it's common knowledge that many infections are spread at the hospital. Infections are also more likely if a woman has had major surgery (c section) than from a vaginal birth. Complications of abortion would not apply to women delivering a baby. Eclampsia also does not differentiate between women VBACing and women undergoing a c-section. Sometimes severe eclampsia does necessitate an emergency c-section, but that's not what's being discussed.

According to my midwife, c-sections are required in about 10% of pregnancies. The hospital closest to where I used to live in Florida had a section rate of about 35%. Do you really think that OBs don't do c sections out of convenience??
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Unread 12-21-2008, 06:13 PM
 
Location: coos bay oregon
2,096 posts, read 5,431,367 times
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my first was an emergency c-section. 5yrs later, i went into labor w/my son. Full labor (after water broke) started at 9am monday. I was fully dialated and pushing hard, but utterly exhaused, and going in and out of delirium by midday Tuesday. After my sons heartrate was shown to be steadily falling and he was obviously not going anywhere, they did a c-section at 10pm tuesday night. I was given every chance to deliver VBAC but when we started to lose my son, i decided IT WAS NOT WORTH IT!! My sons life was so much more important than HOW he came out. I had really wanted to VBAC and had much family cheering that on as well. Im all for that to happen IF it is realistic. BUT, I really really hate having people (almost ALWAYS other women) look down on me, berate me, and smugly tell me how THEY would have NEVER done a c-section. Even my own MIL, gave me h$ll for "giving in" to the c-section. She bemoans it to this day (10yrs later!!) about how AWFUL it was and how DISAPPOINTED and DEVISTATED she is about how his birth went. Who cares? Im just thankful he is alive and totally undamaged. He would not have survived the VBAC had we continued.
My last child, planned c-section. After her birth, the OB came in and had a talk w/me. He said had I attempted the VBAC, there was a tremendious chance my uterus would have split. They had to do some fancy repair surgery on it as it was. good thing i got my tubes tied then!
VBACs are a great option, but I think you should be prepared for anything. If all goes well, then terrific! Thats wonderful! but if it doesnt, dont think of a c-section as a "lesser" birth
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Unread 12-21-2008, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Moon Over Palmettos
5,973 posts, read 11,113,271 times
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My OB was an old fashioned old school older gentleman. My first born was breech, we knew it way early but my doctor discouraged me from having him manually turn her before labor. He said it was painful, and there is no guarantee she would not turn again just before delivery. That being the case, we scheduled a C-section. Which was just as well, cause her cord was around her neck and would have constricted her if she was vaginally delivered. Come second pregnancy, he gave me the option to do VBAC but was full of trepidation. I figured, he's the expert, he's done hundreds and hundreds of deliveries in his lifetime. Thank goodness I agreed to a second C-section...my son was 9 lbs 13 ozs! There was no way I could have pushed him out from my 5 ft frame without ripping to kazoo! As it was, 4 medical professionals had to do chest compressions on me to push him out of my chest cavity. He was full term and wouldn't come out. I thought no less of the birth experience and neither did my family. They both have had healthy childhoods and are thriving as 14 and 12 yo's.
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Unread 12-21-2008, 07:49 PM
 
Location: chicagoland
1,636 posts, read 2,400,184 times
Reputation: 1033
Quote:
Originally Posted by nrfitchett4 View Post
wait??? your having another baby when you admit you can't afford insurance on the first?

I never knew my life was so interesting that I would have people following my posts! Thank you.

Not that I need to answer to you, but yes. I am planning WAY ahead. I had a horrible first experience and by the time my husband is on the FD we will EVENTUALLY have a couple more babies.

And you know what? If his insurance is still TOO high, and we QUALIFY for the aid, we will take it. We have NEVER lied on any of the applications. The government has it there for people who need it, long or short term.


I'm sorry you are bitter. End of story. I will not be responding to you any further. And you sure can bet I will NOT be following YOUR posts.

Back to the VBAC info. Someone said that VBACS are more dangerous than a repeat c-section? That seems odd to me. Not looking for an arguement, just curious. Isn't "stretching" a healed scar better that cutting it open again?

My cut is horizontal, a couple of doctors have told me as long as you wait a couple of years, VBACS are safe as long as done where the staff are READY for a repeat CS.

IDK. I just want to try. Ideally my situation would be as follows:

I go into labor
I stay home and be comfortable.
When contractions are close enough I go to the hospital.
I can finish labor in tub and possibly deliver in.
No medication.
I get my baby in my arms right when he/she is born!
Baby healthy. Everyone happy.
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