U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Sports > Pro Football
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 10-12-2010, 12:23 PM
 
Location: 3219'03.7"N 10643'55.9"W
8,115 posts, read 17,335,259 times
Reputation: 7287

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by flburgos View Post
No doubt that those teams would manhandle any super bowl team that has won in the last 10 years or so. If you watch the game it was so physical and the refs let the guys play. The boy's came close at the end if they had called that pass interference on Deion covering Irvin late in the game the Boy's might of pulled it off despite spotting them 21 points..Switzer also made a lot of mistakes like throwing the ball on 3 straight downs before the half when the boys were only down 10 and the bleeding had stopped. They should of taken a knee and regroup for the second half instead they end up punting and the niners score again before the half.Larry Allen also had no business playing he was si injured he could not block and Troy had pressure all day from that side of the line.Switzer should of put a back up in the game he would of at least blocked just enough to give Troy Aikman more time. There is also no doubt that if Jimmy had stayed the boy's would of won defintely 4 but possibly 5 in a row. I believe that this was the greatest team of all time.I mean they won without a coach in 95.
The Cowboys table was set up by the Herschel Walker trade and great drafting by Jimmy Johnson. Had "Plan B" free agency been upheld in court, the Cowboys would have probably won 5 Super Bowls in a row. Think about the stockpile of players the Cowboys had amassed by the 1993 season started. The offensive line of the Hogs, the Redskins in the 1980s had a degree of notoriety. I would contend the Cowboys offensive line in the early 90s matches up against any line. Mark Stepnoski at center, Nate Newton and Mark Tuenei at guard, Kevin Gogan and Erik Williams at the tackles. The Cowboys were rotating in defensive lineman to the tune of Tony Tolbert, Leon Lett, Jim Jeffcoat, Tony Casillas, Russell Maryland, Charles Haley, who was a hybrid LB-DE, Chad Hennings, Jimmie Jones, and Danny Noonan. They drafted Kevin Smith and Larry Brown at the corners, had one of the best hitting safeties in the form of Darren Woodson, Bill Bates left over from the Tom Landry era, Isaac Holt, Clayton Holmes, there are so many players on this team I can't even name them all here. This, in addition to the HOF skill players like E.Smith, Aikman and Irvin. Jay Novacek catching 80 passes at the TE. Moose Johnston blocking lead at FB. It's the best team in my lifetime. Better than the 1975 or 1978 Steelers. And I say this as an NY Giants fan that despised the Cowboys, but as someone that has to give an adversary its proper due. This team, I believe, never received its proper place in NFL history. And if it weren't for the concession the player's association gave for a salary cap in 1993 in exchange for free agency, this team would have been kept in tact, with the core 37 players the league's collective bargaining parameters allowed at the time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-12-2010, 12:39 PM
 
582 posts, read 1,828,574 times
Reputation: 262
Do you think the patriots somewhat Dynasty would of had a chance against these cowboy's? I say somewhat dynasty because there was no real domination. I think the boy's would of whipped them.The late 90's or so was when football started to get soft and not being played as agrresive like before. Heck, a guy like Brady would of not made it in the 94 game.Aikman got hit many times after releasing the ball and never even looked at the ref for a call. Brady get's hit and looks at the ref to get a roughing the passer call. Just play you sissie.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2010, 12:46 PM
 
1,807 posts, read 2,891,774 times
Reputation: 1228
tom brady > troy aikman.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2010, 12:56 PM
YAZ
 
Location: Phoenix,AZ
7,075 posts, read 11,852,325 times
Reputation: 6298
I just wish that I was old enough to purchase tickets to any game that Johnny Unitas played in.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2010, 12:58 PM
 
582 posts, read 1,828,574 times
Reputation: 262
I am comparing the toughness not the stats. Brady will take Aikman stat wise which does not mean a whole lot to me because so will Drew Bledsoe, Warren Moon etc etc. Aikman did not have to pass for 400 yards to win. The Cowboy's were a more balanced offense the patriota are in the shotgon 80% of the time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2010, 01:59 PM
 
Location: 3219'03.7"N 10643'55.9"W
8,115 posts, read 17,335,259 times
Reputation: 7287
Quote:
Originally Posted by flburgos View Post
I am comparing the toughness not the stats. Brady will take Aikman stat wise which does not mean a whole lot to me because so will Drew Bledsoe, Warren Moon etc etc. Aikman did not have to pass for 400 yards to win. The Cowboy's were a more balanced offense the patriota are in the shotgon 80% of the time.
The Jimmy Johnson teams, ironically, were some of the only teams NOT to employ the shotgun offense, after coach Landry turned it into a vogue offense in the 1980s. The early 90s Cowboys, had, to Jimmy Johnson's admission, about 5 running plays. Almost the same amount as Tecmo Bowl. The philosophy was along the lines of "here's what we are going to run, you know it's coming, and so do we. Try stopping it." That's what really defines greatness, when the entire building knows what you are going to run, and you still can't stop the play, because your offensive line is so demoralizing and kicking the crap out of the defense's front seven. The 90s Cowboys didn't employ trickery like the mid 70s edition: they didn't need it. I will say this: Troy Aikman was largely a product of a superior offensive line, and surrounding skill players. He drove a Cadillac. Tom Brady in the early 2000s was told to drive a Ford. This is not to diminish Troy Aikman's performance. He had a vastly superior surrounding cast, though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-13-2010, 07:49 PM
 
10,691 posts, read 11,700,959 times
Reputation: 6044
Quote:
Originally Posted by nitroae23 View Post
Snow Bowl Game,a.k.a.the famous Brady "Tuck Rule"game,my feet were frozen before kickoff,and the game goes into OVERTIME,and I'm not even a frickin' Patriots fan (love them Cowboys).Note on Vinateri's tying field goal from about 35 yards out,when he kicked it,a moan went up from the crowd,no one thought it was going the distance,it was only about 10 feet off the ground for most of its flight,it just never came down!A awesome clutch kick in those conditions!
That started the spiral down for the Raiders too..... They were never the same after that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-13-2010, 10:24 PM
 
16,531 posts, read 20,986,524 times
Reputation: 47985
Quote:
Originally Posted by YAZ View Post
I just wish that I was old enough to purchase tickets to any game that Johnny Unitas played in.
I only got to see him once. And it was a game that didn't even count in the standings as it was just an exhibition game. But I got to see him. Twenty three years later I got to meet him and shake the mans hand!

In a meaningless game with the Denver Broncos at Mile High Stadium in the 1971 season Johnny wasn't the only Colt to get standing ovations from the fans. So did Tom Matte, Mike Curtis, Lenny Lyles, Jimmy Orr, John Mackey and several old line Colts from the late 50's and early 60's. And there was good reason for it.

Until 1960, with the exception of the Los Angeles Rams and the San Francisco 49ers, professional football was Chicago and the cities east of there. Anyone else in the remaining time zones watched it on television. When Johnny Unitas came into the league, football was a distant second to baseball as America's most watched spectator sport.

I'm not sure who pulled the strings on this one, but the Baltimore Colts had trained in Denver for a week in the 1971 season at the Colorado School of Mines training camp at Golden, Colorado and later played a pre season game with the Broncos at Mile High Stadium. The game itself was your basic ho-hummer, but the Colts had their starters in there for almost 3 quarters. It was regular season enough for me.

I can't stress enough of his importance in the development of professional football; its history, its development. He was one of my heroes growing up as a kid. Still is one of my heroes. He, along with Jim Brown and Vince Lombardi were primarily responsible from turning America from a baseball watching nation to a football watching nation.

Not overnight, but they started that change.

Last edited by DOUBLE H; 10-14-2010 at 12:23 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2010, 12:43 PM
 
16,531 posts, read 20,986,524 times
Reputation: 47985
When the New Orleans Saints won the Super Bowl this past February, they finally hit paydirt . As an expansion franchise set up in 1967, they knew losing like few other clubs would ever experience, finally breaking a twenty year streak and posting a 12-3 record in the 1987 NFL strike shortened season under Jim Mora.

But until that Super Bowl win, to a lot of peoples minds they would always be known as the Aint's. Obviously standing for no winning seasons, and that kicked in after week 11 of the 1980 season. I saw the Saints the previous year play the Broncos In the 1979 season on November 4th and played them tough. I was always impressed with Archie Manning and from what I saw out of their defense I thought they were close to becoming a factor in the NFC West. They finished that season at 8-8.

I couldn't have been further wrong. In the 1980 season they were playing as badly as ever. By week 11 they were sitting at 0-10. At first they were at least competitive, but after a while they were getting thumped every week.

As a city who always was known to enjoy a good time if nothing else, long time New Orleans sportscaster Buddy Diliberto was the one behind the movement of wearing bags over their heads. It was guaranteed to get national attention as it was a Monday night game that the Saints would play in which was won by the Los Angeles Rams 27-7. Diliberto was probably the most colorful sportscaster and sports talk show host New Orleans ever had at that time. He originally had kind of borrowed the idea from one of the comedians of the syndicated television program "The Gong Show." There was a comedian on that show who referred to himself as "The Unknown Comic" who always had a little bit of schtick reserved for that show, and would always wear a bag over his head. The Gong Show was very popular back in that time.

And the guy who took the brunt of the joke was head coach Dick Nolan. That entire game had the ABC cameras focused on the crowd, and it was more than just a few fans wearing bags over their heads, it was probably thousands. And there were some interesting ones out there as well. There were your basic grocery sacks with eyes cut out on them, there were bags that were lit up by what looked like Christmas decorations, obviously powered by AA batteries, there were just all kinds out there. And a lot of the fans saw they were caught by the cameras as they would wave, stand up, and maybe some of them taking off their bags and putting them bag on, bowing to the crowd. Probably the one I remembered the most were two guys dressed up in painters bib overalls. They went one better as they wore paint cans instead of bags.

At first there were a few amusing comments by Frank Gifford and Don Meredith in the TV booth. By halfway through the third quarter it appeared that ABC realized that things started to cease being funny. Archie Manning was getting sacked continuously, the running game wasn't going right, and the Los Angeles Rams were cruising easily. By the two minute warning Howard Cosell was at least trying to give a good word about Dick Nolan, the great New York Giant defensive back of the 1950's-60's, and the Dick Nolan who turned around the San Francisco 49ers and led them to some great seasons in the early to mid 1970's. Needless to say, Dick Nolan was let go by Saints management that next day. And to my knowledge never became a head coach in the NFL again (not sure about an assistant coach role).

It was one of those memorable games that clubs would rather not put in their team history highlight video. It was memorable nonetheless.

Last edited by DOUBLE H; 10-22-2010 at 02:37 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2010, 04:29 PM
 
Location: 3219'03.7"N 10643'55.9"W
8,115 posts, read 17,335,259 times
Reputation: 7287
Quote:
Originally Posted by DOUBLE H View Post
When the New Orleans Saints won the Super Bowl this past February, they finally hit paydirt . As an expansion franchise set up in 1967, they knew losing like few other clubs would ever experience, finally breaking a twenty year streak and posting a 12-3 record in the 1987 NFL strike shortened season under Jim Mora.

But until that Super Bowl win, to a lot of peoples minds they would always be known as the Aint's. Obviously standing for no winning seasons, and that kicked in after week 11 of the 1980 season. I saw the Saints the previous year play the Broncos In the 1979 season on November 4th and played them tough. I was always impressed with Archie Manning and from what I saw out of their defense I thought they were close to becoming a factor in the NFC West. They finished that season at 8-8.

I couldn't have been further wrong. In the 1980 season they were playing as badly as ever. By week 11 they were sitting at 0-10. At first they were at least competitive, but after a while they were getting thumped every week.

As a city who always was known to enjoy a good time if nothing else, long time New Orleans sportscaster Buddy Diliberto was the one behind the movement of wearing bags over their heads. It was guaranteed to get national attention as it was a Monday night game that the Saints would play in which was won by the Los Angeles Rams 27-7. Diliberto was probably the most colorful sportscaster and sports talk show host New Orleans ever had at that time. He originally had kind of borrowed the idea from one of the comedians of the syndicated television program "The Gong Show." There was a comedian on that show who referred to himself as "The Unknown Comic" who always had a little bit of schtick reserved for that show, and would always wear a bag over his head. The Gong Show was very popular back in that time.

And the guy who took the brunt of the joke was head coach Dick Nolan. That entire game had the ABC cameras focused on the crowd, and it was more than just a few fans wearing bags over their heads, it was probably thousands. And there were some interesting ones out there as well. There were your basic grocery sacks with eyes cut out on them, there were bags that were lit up by what looked like Christmas decorations, obviously powered by AA batteries, there were just all kinds out there. And a lot of the fans saw they were caught by the cameras as they would wave, stand up, and maybe some of them taking off their bags and putting them bag on, bowing to the crowd. Probably the one I remembered the most were two guys dressed up in painters bib overalls. They went one better as they wore paint cans instead of bags.

At first there were a few amusing comments by Frank Gifford and Don Meredith in the TV booth. By halfway through the third quarter it appeared that ABC realized that things started to cease being funny. Archie Manning was getting sacked continuously, the running game wasn't going right, and the Los Angeles Rams were cruising easily. By the two minute warning Howard Cosell was at least trying to give a good word about Dick Nolan, the great New York Giant defensive back of the 1950's-60's, and the Dick Nolan who turned around the San Francisco 49ers and led them to some great seasons in the early to mid 1970's. Needless to say, Dick Nolan was let go by Saints management that next day. And to my knowledge never became a head coach in the NFL again (not sure about an assistant coach role).

It was one of those memorable games that clubs would rather not put in their team history highlight video. It was memorable nonetheless.
Thanks, DoubleH, for the DM about this post. A great read as always.

What this game and this season brought back, for me, almost instantaneously, was that this Saints team also suffered the worst second half collapse in NFL history , a few weeks later, if memory serves, me, against the San Francisco 49ers. I believe the halftime score was 35-7, Saints, in week 14 of the NFL season. That would have made the Saints 0-13 going into that game, so they were going to finally break through to their first victory. I remember the game was at Candlestick Park, and it was very, very rainy. The Saints were wearing those distinct unis back in those days: jet black pants, striped in gold and white, and white jerseys.

The second half gets underway, and I am watching my Giants play the Seattle Seahawks, also on the west coast. Every 10 minutes, it seemed, the network kept going back to Brent Musberger at CBS sports.. "And Montana throws it to Dwight Clark, who goes in for the score" "Montana, again, to Freddie Solomon". Then, with I think a minute left, a name from the past Lenvil Elliott, takes a sweep around right corner, and Saints players are slipping all over the Candlestick mud, and the game is tied. Ray Wersching went onto win the game in overtime.

The reason I mention this game is not so much that it is notable for being the greatest comeback in NFL history as much as I think it really launched the mantle of the 1980s 49ers dynasty. The 1980 49ers went 6-10, but at the end of that year, finally found their QB, directly as a result of that game. I remember the following preseason in 1981, at the height of my NFL passion, telling my friends in high school, that the 49ers were going to win the Super Bowl that year. We all got together and predicted the NFL by division and conference at the beginning of the year, and my friends thought I was absolutely crazy. At the end of the year, I felt like Nostradamus.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Sports > Pro Football
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top