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Old 10-20-2010, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Midwestern Dystopia
2,370 posts, read 3,058,133 times
Reputation: 2962

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Jeff Fisher was asked to call timeouts for MNF commercial breaks - Shutdown Corner - NFL* - Yahoo! Sports



Our own Chris Chase wondered earlier Tuesday why Chris Johnson was in the game so late when the Tennessee Titans were beating up on the Jacksonville Jaguars on "Monday Night Football." You may have wondered why Jags head coach Jack Del Rio seemed insistent on prolonging the suffering in a 30-3 laugher in which we saw far too little interesting football and far too much Trent Edwards(notes). Titans coach Jeff Fisher intimated in Chase's piece that he kept the pedal to the floor because of the two timeouts Del Rio called after the two-minute warning, but as it turns out, Del Rio had a reason for doing so that went beyond the strategic: video

"Jack used his timeouts," Fisher said. "My understanding is they needed network timeouts, and that's why Jack used his timeouts. They came over and asked me to do it, but I said, 'I was hoping to get a first down and kneel on it.'"
Fisher has an interesting sense of humor (you may remember that he tried to break his team's 2009 losing streak by donning a Peyton Manning jersey), but in this case, he wasn't joking. Terry McCormick of TitanInsider.com has the real story, based on Fisher's Tuesday press conference with the local media:
"At the two-minute warning in every game in the fourth quarter, there are conversations that go by. There's conversations that take place at the two-minute warning before the first half. But there's conversations that take place, and it's the official's responsibility to give the head coach a status of commercials and TV timeouts," Fisher said. "Yesterday, I was told that they were two short. And they looked at me and smiled, and I said, 'Sorry, I can't help you.' Mike Carey came across and said, 'Here's the deal. We're two short.' And I said, 'Mike, I can't help you. I'm trying to get a first down and I'm gonna kneel on it.'
McCormick told me that he did not know (nor did Fisher) whether Del Rio took his timeouts in accordance with Carey's request, or the league's specific need for TV timeouts.

the NFL is investingating ESPN's handling of the timeout issue.


Perhaps the most disconcerting thing about this story -- the part that made it so hard to believe at first -- is the idea of a television network, and the need for ad revenue, deciding the pace of a game (no matter how awful it may be). That Carey would break away from his responsibility as a supposedly objective arbiter of the on-field action to try and wrangle timeouts from coaches in the name of commercial breaks -- well, this is where we truly have gone down the rabbit hole. And judging from Fisher's comments, this happens all the time.
Hmmm. Maybe when we blame Andy Reid and other coaches for all that clock-mangling inside the two-minute warning, it's been another culprit all along?
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thoughts? not really surprising since the WSJ report here:

Football Games Have 11 Minutes of Action - WSJ.com

some highlights:

According to a Wall Street Journal study of four recent broadcasts, and similar estimates by researchers, the average amount of time the ball is in play on the field during an NFL game is about 11 minutes.
In other words, if you tally up everything that happens between the time the ball is snapped and the play is whistled dead by the officials, there's barely enough time to prepare a hard-boiled egg. In fact, the average telecast devotes 56% more time to showing replays.

So what do the networks do with the other 174 minutes in a typical broadcast? Not surprisingly, commercials take up about an hour. As many as 75 minutes, or about 60% of the total air time, excluding commercials, is spent on shots of players huddling, standing at the line of scrimmage or just generally milling about between snaps. In the four broadcasts The Journal studied, injured players got six more seconds of camera time than celebrating players. While the network announcers showed up on screen for just 30 seconds, shots of the head coaches and referees took up about 7% of the average show.

After a routine play is whistled dead, the clock will continue to run, even as the players are peeling themselves off the turf and limping back to their huddles. The team on offense has a maximum of 40 seconds after one play ends to snap the ball again. A regulation NFL game consists of four quarters of 15 minutes each, but because the typical play only lasts about four seconds, the ratio of inaction to action is approximately 10 to 1.
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this goes in line with a similar rant I have about the rediculous commercialization of all american sports. IMO it's gotten beyond rediculousness to the point I rarely ever watch any football outside my fav. NFL team and even then sometimes I don't always watch the whole game or record it to FF thru the commercials. ( I know, que all the posters who'll say I'm not a "real" fan)

Somebody posted in the Baseball forum about the length of PO games and basically all anybody could say to him was that he wasn't a real fan. But the truth is games take way longer to play nowadays than in the past. Part of that is television, part of that is these challenges.

I hear people wanting to expand replay but nobody ever talks about how much longer these games are taking. All I ever hear about is how busy people are, how busy their lives are but sports games are getting even longer. Seems a contradiction. This isn't a debate about the merits of soccer as I'm also a fan, but say what you want , whether you like soccer or not, at least when I'm watching a game I don't have to sit thru a bunch of commercials to watch it. (I know, it boring and they all just stand around and chase after a ball) but before you say that make sure you read the WSJ article I linked and then get back to me on all the standing around in football.
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Old 10-20-2010, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Midwestern Dystopia
2,370 posts, read 3,058,133 times
Reputation: 2962
wow, 21 views and not one reply, doesn't anyone think this is important? I mean the broadcaster is pushing the refs to push the coaches in the National Football League to call their timeouts even when they're not needed. Even in blowout games.

You guys don't find the games boring with so many commercials? You don't find the game too broken up?

do I need to stop taking my Ritilan?
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Old 10-20-2010, 06:39 PM
 
5,148 posts, read 4,433,344 times
Reputation: 2865
I find the NFL so boring, that I only watch my Cardinals.
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Old 10-20-2010, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis
3,675 posts, read 7,841,849 times
Reputation: 2333
What do you want me to say? The article speaks for itself! It's ridicilous period.
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Old 10-21-2010, 07:14 AM
 
16 posts, read 49,631 times
Reputation: 16
Yeah, I heard about this as well. If this is a reality, then it shows to an extent that the NFL is looking towards gaining financially and it is taking away from the game. What is the point of calling timeouts in a game that is pretty much decided well into the end of the 4th quarter? Jack Del Rio knew the game was over, so it was really no point of him calling timeouts.
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Old 10-21-2010, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Midwestern Dystopia
2,370 posts, read 3,058,133 times
Reputation: 2962
thanks for the responses, I just think it's amazing. Back in "the day" the games only took 2 hours 15mins. to play. I understand they might need to take a little longer now but it's gotten completely out of control.

I for one am glad the secrets out, I hope it leads to some kind of change and that people will demand it but I'm not holding my breath.

I agree, I only really watch my favorite team today because the games take so long. I'll watch a few small segments of another game every once in a while but don't actually sit down to watch other games nowadays.
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Old 10-21-2010, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
3,391 posts, read 4,240,706 times
Reputation: 2024
Quote:
Originally Posted by Badger View Post
wow, 21 views and not one reply, doesn't anyone think this is important? I mean the broadcaster is pushing the refs to push the coaches in the National Football League to call their timeouts even when they're not needed. Even in blowout games.

You guys don't find the games boring with so many commercials? You don't find the game too broken up?

do I need to stop taking my Ritilan?
Just saw this Badger, and thanks for bringing it up. All I can say is wow, but it doesn't surprise me that much.
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Old 10-21-2010, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Sherwood, OR
663 posts, read 1,651,528 times
Reputation: 666
First and foremost, the NFL is a business. ESPN alone pays the NFL $1.1 Billion (with a "B") per year for broadcast rights. Combine that will all other networks and it amounts to about $17 Billion for broadcast rights through the 2011 season. With that said, do you think they are going to add or reduce commercials?

Things change. Back in the "day" when games were shorter, were players making salaries that rival the GDP of a small country? How will those ridiculous salaries get paid if you remove broadcast money? Back in the "day", could you watch your team play when you were out of town?

Unless you expect the NFL to limit their growth and convince players they should be making less money, its the way it is. I don't like it any more than you.
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Old 10-21-2010, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
40,056 posts, read 30,523,672 times
Reputation: 10490
If the league was absolutely serious, Fisher would be suspended. I wonder who thinks that might actually happen?
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Old 10-21-2010, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Englewood, Near Eastside Indy
8,340 posts, read 14,097,157 times
Reputation: 5958
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeftCoastee View Post
Things change. Back in the "day" when games were shorter, were players making salaries that rival the GDP of a small country? How will those ridiculous salaries get paid if you remove broadcast money?

Unless you expect the NFL to limit their growth and convince players they should be making less money, its the way it is. I don't like it any more than you.
Player salaries did not cause the NFL to demand more money. You have it inverted. Player salaries are what they are because of the money the NFL brings in.
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