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Old 01-23-2015, 09:09 AM
 
Location: The Republic of Texas
66,574 posts, read 33,889,281 times
Reputation: 14285

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Can a scientific approach be made to this deflated football deal?

Filled(who knows how much moisture introduced: ambient conditions inside the ball) and officially verified/inspected in the heated locker room and stored to acclimate to the heated facilities before game time.

Now take these balls into the much cooler temperatures and cool the trapped air inside the ball.
The pressure is physically going to drop inside the ball to what it was in the heated facilities it was aired and stored prior to the game.

Not to mention the humidity levels inside the ball are going to rise. High humidity( a lot of moisture in the air) is a low pressure zone.

Your car tires are a perfect example of cooling and heating air that is trapped inside.
Drive your car. Feel your tire immediately after highway travel. It is warm but not hot to the touch.
A car tire can gain or lose 5-lbs. of pressure in a 30º-f change in temperature.


Remember pressure is not volume the air occupies, as it is heated and cooled.
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Old 01-23-2015, 10:06 AM
 
768 posts, read 420,103 times
Reputation: 456
Quote:
Originally Posted by BentBow View Post
Can a scientific approach be made to this deflated football deal?

Filled(who knows how much moisture introduced: ambient conditions inside the ball) and officially verified/inspected in the heated locker room and stored to acclimate to the heated facilities before game time.

Now take these balls into the much cooler temperatures and cool the trapped air inside the ball.
The pressure is physically going to drop inside the ball to what it was in the heated facilities it was aired and stored prior to the game.

Not to mention the humidity levels inside the ball are going to rise. High humidity( a lot of moisture in the air) is a low pressure zone.

Your car tires are a perfect example of cooling and heating air that is trapped inside.
Drive your car. Feel your tire immediately after highway travel. It is warm but not hot to the touch.
A car tire can gain or lose 5-lbs. of pressure in a 30º-f change in temperature.


Remember pressure is not volume the air occupies, as it is heated and cooled.
Google search will give you the answer. Your number greatly overstate the effect. If you were correct the games played in zero degrees would see balls with very little pressure.
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Old 01-23-2015, 11:25 AM
 
6,470 posts, read 3,471,624 times
Reputation: 10267
Quote:
Originally Posted by BentBow View Post
Can a scientific approach be made to this deflated football deal?

Filled(who knows how much moisture introduced: ambient conditions inside the ball) and officially verified/inspected in the heated locker room and stored to acclimate to the heated facilities before game time.

Now take these balls into the much cooler temperatures and cool the trapped air inside the ball.
The pressure is physically going to drop inside the ball to what it was in the heated facilities it was aired and stored prior to the game.

Not to mention the humidity levels inside the ball are going to rise. High humidity( a lot of moisture in the air) is a low pressure zone.

Your car tires are a perfect example of cooling and heating air that is trapped inside.
Drive your car. Feel your tire immediately after highway travel. It is warm but not hot to the touch.
A car tire can gain or lose 5-lbs. of pressure in a 30º-f change in temperature.


Remember pressure is not volume the air occupies, as it is heated and cooled.
Can't compare a tire to a football. Tire pressure changes due to not only the elements, but from heat and friction. A football doesn't turn on pavement, so unless you just compared a tire sitting in the same environment as a football and ran tests and compared pressure changes as a percentage of the whole, there is not test.
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Old 01-23-2015, 02:05 PM
 
52,088 posts, read 41,892,714 times
Reputation: 32482
Here is a good source, if the balls were 12.5 warm (70 degees) and indoors they could have been 11ish out on the field @50 degrees.

Deflate-gate: Could the weather have an effect on ball pressure? : nfl

Not sure on the official rules re: what the on-field pressure has to be or if it's done at a set temperature and if it's softer on the field so be it?

Regardless, it's *plausible* but unlikely that NE did this accidentally lol and for Brady etc. to say they didn't notice is hillarious.
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Old 01-23-2015, 07:31 PM
 
9,672 posts, read 4,627,169 times
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And it only affected 12 out of 24?
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Old 01-23-2015, 08:45 PM
 
6,470 posts, read 3,471,624 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Floorist View Post
And it only affected 12 out of 24?
Brady said he likes his balls to be 12.5 at the beginning of the game.

Maybe Andrew Luck likes his at the high end at 13.5, so any loss would still keep it legal under environmental deflation. I wonder if the Colts balls testing will be in the report they isse?
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Old 01-24-2015, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Hiding from Antifa?
6,435 posts, read 4,194,424 times
Reputation: 5727
Quote:
Originally Posted by BentBow View Post
Can a scientific approach be made to this deflated football deal?

Filled(who knows how much moisture introduced: ambient conditions inside the ball) and officially verified/inspected in the heated locker room and stored to acclimate to the heated facilities before game time.

Now take these balls into the much cooler temperatures and cool the trapped air inside the ball.
The pressure is physically going to drop inside the ball to what it was in the heated facilities it was aired and stored prior to the game.

Not to mention the humidity levels inside the ball are going to rise. High humidity( a lot of moisture in the air) is a low pressure zone.

Your car tires are a perfect example of cooling and heating air that is trapped inside.
Drive your car. Feel your tire immediately after highway travel. It is warm but not hot to the touch.
A car tire can gain or lose 5-lbs. of pressure in a 30º-f change in temperature.


Remember pressure is not volume the air occupies, as it is heated and cooled.
Let's take a truck with, say, 12 tires on it. That's an unusual number of tires on a truck, but we will use 12 in our example anyway. None of the tires has any leaks. The truck is parked in a heated terminal and someone checks the tire pressure and makes them all the same. Someone moves the truck outside. After a day in the freezing cold someone checks the pressure again. Would you expect a similar drop in pressure in all 12 tires? If one tire was still at its original pressure would you suspect that someone came along and added air to it?
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Old 01-24-2015, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Hiding from Antifa?
6,435 posts, read 4,194,424 times
Reputation: 5727
Quote:
Originally Posted by Floorist View Post
And it only affected 12 out of 24?
11 out of 24.
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Old 01-24-2015, 07:32 AM
 
Location: Southern NH
2,532 posts, read 4,964,063 times
Reputation: 1721
Were the balls used in the second half at the correct pressure? If so, Brady should go for the higher end of the range as the Pats scored 17 points in the first half and 28 in the second half...
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Old 01-24-2015, 08:11 AM
 
9,672 posts, read 4,627,169 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruzincat View Post
11 out of 24.
Nope, they are saying 12 out of 24 now. They changed it.
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