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Old 02-07-2017, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Gulf Coast Texas
28,460 posts, read 15,436,866 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GalileoSmith View Post
It very well may have been a factor in the Super Bowl which given the magnitude of the game, is unfortunate.
I think the larger factor was Atlanta botching a 28-3 second half lead. I will leave it at that.
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Old 02-07-2017, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Type 0.7 Kardashev
10,577 posts, read 7,274,031 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seamusnh View Post
Should the NFL change the rule just for the Super Bowl but leave it in place as it is for the regular season? There are already complaints that the game takes too long in the regular season. Having different rules for a playoff game than for the regular season would be odd.
Not really.

The NFL instituted an overtime rule in 1940, but for divisional tie-break playoffs only - not for regular season games or for the Championship Game. In 1946, overtime was added for title games. In 1960, the AFL followed suit. It was not until 1974 that overtime for regular season games was introduced - but even then (as now) it was limited to maximum of 15 minutes, whereas in the postseason it goes on indefinitely.

The NHL also has different overtime rules for the regular season and postseason.

Now, I am not suggesting that the NFL should change the rules. I can understand the sentiment for it. The problem is that players wear down - as we say with the Falcons defense. The further you get into overtime, the more the play really gets away from normal football just because of the exhaustion. So let's say you have two high-powered offenses (you know, like the Patriots and Falcons). The Patriots win the toss, march down the field, score a touchdown. Then it's Atlanta's turn and they do the same. Back to New England - ditto. Is the game over then? Wait - someone will point out that because both defenses are completely wiped by that point that most drives are likely to result in touchdowns, so Atlanta should keep getting chances to match New England.

Where does it end?

I think people are mistakenly thinking that there is some ideal overtime method. But there's not. No solution can accommodate all the realities of football and competition.

The current system isn't perfect, but it's probably the least-flawed of all possibilities.
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Old 02-07-2017, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Here
1,694 posts, read 1,494,222 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Unsettomati View Post
Not really.

The NFL instituted an overtime rule in 1940, but for divisional tie-break playoffs only - not for regular season games or for the Championship Game. In 1946, overtime was added for title games. In 1960, the AFL followed suit. It was not until 1974 that overtime for regular season games was introduced - but even then (as now) it was limited to maximum of 15 minutes, whereas in the postseason it goes on indefinitely.

The NHL also has different overtime rules for the regular season and postseason.

Now, I am not suggesting that the NFL should change the rules. I can understand the sentiment for it. The problem is that players wear down - as we say with the Falcons defense. The further you get into overtime, the more the play really gets away from normal football just because of the exhaustion. So let's say you have two high-powered offenses (you know, like the Patriots and Falcons). The Patriots win the toss, march down the field, score a touchdown. Then it's Atlanta's turn and they do the same. Back to New England - ditto. Is the game over then? Wait - someone will point out that because both defenses are completely wiped by that point that most drives are likely to result in touchdowns, so Atlanta should keep getting chances to match New England.

Where does it end?

I think people are mistakenly thinking that there is some ideal overtime method. But there's not. No solution can accommodate all the realities of football and competition.

The current system isn't perfect, but it's probably the least-flawed of all possibilities.
It could be as easy as this; one team scores a touchdown and the other team has an equal opportunity. If the second team scores, then each team starts at their own 20 yard line and they each get 4 downs to move the ball as far as they can. The team that gains the most yardage over those four downs wins. It would be exciting and it would be strategic. Does a team try for long or even mid-range passes knowing an incompletion gains them no yards and costs them one of their four downs?

The college OT method is better when compared to the NFL OT format. It dismisses some aspects of the game such as punting and the long passing plays but it allows for an equal opportunity to win the game using the aspects of football and avoiding the luck of a coin flip to give advantages.
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Old 02-07-2017, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
21,318 posts, read 21,881,811 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GalileoSmith View Post
It could be as easy as this; one team scores a touchdown and the other team has an equal opportunity. If the second team scores, then each team starts at their own 20 yard line and they each get 4 downs to move the ball as far as they can. The team that gains the most yardage over those four downs wins. It would be exciting and it would be strategic. Does a team try for long or even mid-range passes knowing an incompletion gains them no yards and costs them one of their four downs?

we were building up all this time for this? This is the most horrible idea I've ever heard in my life. If this idea was a boat, it would sink to the bottom of the sea in an instant.
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Old 02-07-2017, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Here
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghengis View Post
we were building up all this time for this? This is the most horrible idea I've ever heard in my life. If this idea was a boat, it would sink to the bottom of the sea in an instant.
Why is it a bad idea? Or rather, why is it worse than flipping a coin and allowing the winner of the flip to win if they score a TD?
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Old 02-07-2017, 04:31 PM
Status: "RIP Solomon Tekah" (set 7 days ago)
 
1,223 posts, read 580,344 times
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Keep the rule as is. I think the sudden death TD is fair.
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Old 02-07-2017, 04:55 PM
 
Location: Type 0.7 Kardashev
10,577 posts, read 7,274,031 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GalileoSmith View Post
It could be as easy as this; one team scores a touchdown and the other team has an equal opportunity. If the second team scores, then each team starts at their own 20 yard line and they each get 4 downs to move the ball as far as they can. The team that gains the most yardage over those four downs wins. It would be exciting and it would be strategic. Does a team try for long or even mid-range passes knowing an incompletion gains them no yards and costs them one of their four downs?
That's not football.

How about the punters arm-wrestle to decide who wins? That wouldn't be any worse than your suggestion...

Quote:
Originally Posted by GalileoSmith View Post
The college OT method is better when compared to the NFL OT format. It dismisses some aspects of the game such as punting and the long passing plays but it allows for an equal opportunity to win the game using the aspects of football and avoiding the luck of a coin flip to give advantages.
The college format is an abomination because it's not football.

It's.
Not.
Football.

The college format suffers from the same problem as the shootout (the shootout isn't hockey) and the penalty shootout (the penalty shootout isn't soccer). It's like breaking baseball ties with a home-run contest, or basketball times with a game of H-O-R-S-E.

But, hey, write to Roger Goodell. It's such a bad idea that he'd probably love it.
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Old 02-07-2017, 05:28 PM
 
Location: Here
1,694 posts, read 1,494,222 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Unsettomati View Post
That's not football.

How about the punters arm-wrestle to decide who wins? That wouldn't be any worse than your suggestion...



The college format is an abomination because it's not football.

It's.
Not.
Football.

The college format suffers from the same problem as the shootout (the shootout isn't hockey) and the penalty shootout (the penalty shootout isn't soccer). It's like breaking baseball ties with a home-run contest, or basketball times with a game of H-O-R-S-E.

But, hey, write to Roger Goodell. It's such a bad idea that he'd probably love it.
Here is the reality: in the Super Bowl one team gained a huge advantage due to a coin flip. It allowed one team to win without the other team a chance to reciprocate. It would seem to me that anything involving the skills found on a football field would be better than allowing one team to gain an advantage due to a coin flip, an advantage that ended up deciding the Super Bowl. The college overtime allows for both teams to have an equal chance to win while using the skills found in football.
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Old 02-07-2017, 07:00 PM
 
Location: Wyoming
9,416 posts, read 17,388,691 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GalileoSmith View Post
Here is the reality: in the Super Bowl one team gained a huge advantage due to a coin flip. It allowed one team to win without the other team a chance to reciprocate. It would seem to me that anything involving the skills found on a football field would be better than allowing one team to gain an advantage due to a coin flip, an advantage that ended up deciding the Super Bowl. The college overtime allows for both teams to have an equal chance to win while using the skills found in football.
A "huge advantage"? Hardly. As posted earlier, the advantage seems to be around 7 percent. That's not huge.

The coin flip has been a part of football for as long as I can remember. The game starts with a coin flip. I'm sure the advantage in winning that isn't as great as for overtime, but it's still there. It's part of the strategy of the game -- to receive the ball first or to pick the end of the field that might be more favorable, or to make that choice for the start of the second half. Let's face it, luck plays a big part of every game and makes it more exciting. Edelman said on the Tonight Show" last night that his fabulous 4th qtr catch was probably 70 percent luck and 30 percent skill.

Even if you gave each team the ball on the 20 yard line, etc., etc., you'd still have a coin flip to decide who got the ball first. In that case, I'd imagine the team that got the ball last would have an advantage -- in knowing how their opponents did.

I like the current overtime rules for post-season. Not sure I like regular game OTs that can end in a tie -- and did in 3 games this past season.
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Old 02-07-2017, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Two Rivers, Wisconsin
11,723 posts, read 11,545,104 times
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After a game like this, always a great deal of discussion but I think the OT rules stay. I'm still not crazy about ties in the regular season, there should be a winner.

The ties can play into the seeding for the playoffs and that doesn't seem right, even though the team I follow won the division because of a tie game.
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