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Old 05-22-2012, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Ontario
329 posts, read 766,359 times
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I am worried that I will not understand them and asking them to repeat shows them I do not understand. I worry they think me "unworldly" for not understanding or they will be mad because they think they don't have an accent or that their English is really good. One tip I learned from watching British TV is to watch someone's mouth when they talk. I don't know why but this seems to help me understand them better.
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Old 05-25-2012, 10:48 PM
 
9,018 posts, read 7,953,736 times
Reputation: 14414
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrandyPuppy1977 View Post
I have a slight Southern accent, and now live in the NYC area. There are a lot of "funny" features of the New York accent that you don't always hear in the movies. Not only is it non-rhotic (which most of the time, the Southern accent ISN'T), but vowel sounds in this dialect have a pattern which is alien to me. Because of the Civil War and all, I get a little bit nervous around locals of NYC based on how different our accents are.
I gotta say I love accents, the southern accent, the New York accent....yeah, it's cool I also love foreign accents.....definitely sexy
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Old 05-30-2012, 10:26 AM
 
12,440 posts, read 14,569,865 times
Reputation: 14146
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrandyPuppy1977 View Post
I have a slight Southern accent, and now live in the NYC area. There are a lot of "funny" features of the New York accent that you don't always hear in the movies. Not only is it non-rhotic (which most of the time, the Southern accent ISN'T), but vowel sounds in this dialect have a pattern which is alien to me. Because of the Civil War and all, I get a little bit nervous around locals of NYC based on how different our accents are.
I always like to hear a good accent
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Old 05-30-2012, 07:30 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 43,171,395 times
Reputation: 11862
'That guy sounds like an A-rab! Maude, better call the FBI!'
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Old 06-01-2012, 09:55 PM
 
10,452 posts, read 10,232,873 times
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I can't imagine feeling uncomfortable because of someone's accent. I've gotten really good at understanding all kinds of thick accents because I go to a school for the deaf and listening to people with speech skills that would be deemed unintelligible by most is a part of my everyday life. In fact, for my deaf friends who like to voice, I've become the de facto "go to voiceover person" when other hearing people have no idea what they're saying, lol.
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Old 06-01-2012, 09:57 PM
 
Location: Toronto
3,338 posts, read 5,541,199 times
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Not really uncomfortable unless they are difficult to understand for me when they speak.
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Old 06-01-2012, 10:36 PM
 
4,043 posts, read 2,891,537 times
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Not at all. In fact, I probably smile when listening to them. I dig hearing other accents. It's fun to listen to them. That is, unless their accent is so strong that it's hard to understand any of their words. THAT can be uncomfortable, and just difficult to reply in a timely manner.
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Old 06-01-2012, 10:43 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
4,179 posts, read 9,120,242 times
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It actually makes me pay more attention, in case I miss some different words or unusually-accented ones.

My biggest problem is that when I hear an accent for a length of time, I fall into it - pick up the cadence and sometimes even use the "foreigner's" words. My father's family speaks a lot of Gaelic, I spent six weeks with them one year, and when I went back home to SC, I still had the 'accent'. When folks come up to me and speak in Spanish or French (in both of which I had an education, although it was many years ago) I respond without even thinking about it, in that language.

I like accents and listen to them intently; and try to pick them up.
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Old 06-01-2012, 11:10 PM
 
10,452 posts, read 10,232,873 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCGranny View Post
It actually makes me pay more attention, in case I miss some different words or unusually-accented ones.

My biggest problem is that when I hear an accent for a length of time, I fall into it - pick up the cadence and sometimes even use the "foreigner's" words. My father's family speaks a lot of Gaelic, I spent six weeks with them one year, and when I went back home to SC, I still had the 'accent'. When folks come up to me and speak in Spanish or French (in both of which I had an education, although it was many years ago) I respond without even thinking about it, in that language.

I like accents and listen to them intently; and try to pick them up.
Lol, I am guilty of this too. I spend a lot of time around deaf people and consciously have to remind myself not to fall into their accents. It's just so natural for me to match the person I'm talking to, on all levels, including word choice and syntax and even their overall demeanor.

I've also been known to fall into a Russian accent around Russians, an Indian accent around Indians, various types of vernacular English around speakers of those dialects, etc. It always looks really bad, particularly when the person I end up emulating is of another race, and then the whole thing gets misconstrued as racism.
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Old 06-07-2012, 11:33 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
102 posts, read 271,738 times
Reputation: 221
I live in the south, and I do have a southern accent. That's just part of who I am, and it doesn't reflect poorly on me. I'm an intelligent person, a nursing student, and someone who is compassionate, friendly, accepting, and kind to everyone. If someone is going to judge me solely on how my voice sounds, then I don't really want to get to know them anyway. Accents don't bother me, and I don't judge anyone based on how they sound. I've befriended northerners and southerners alike, and their accents played no part in the friendship.
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