U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Psychology
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-12-2014, 04:28 PM
Status: "I'm a poet and I know it." (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: Old Bellevue, WA
13,539 posts, read 5,141,528 times
Reputation: 5409

Advertisements

So I live in the Seattle area, and everyone is going crazy about the Seahawks. Co workers show up for work wearing Seahawk Jerseys and hats. I walked to the grocery store today, and the real estate broker on the way had some kind of '12th man' sign in the window. The way I see it: bah, humbug.

It's a fairly bizarre model if you think about it. You've got a bunch of beefy guys paid to basically beat the snot out of each other, and I'm supposed to care because the checks are drawn on Paul Allen's account who lives a few miles away on Mercer Island, WA? Yet clearly the model does work. It worked on me too--growing up as a kid in Illinois I was a rabid Cub fan. My mood for the day was very dependent of how the Cubs did. If they won, I was happy as a clam; if they lost, I was down in the dumps. Today I couldn't tell you the name of one Cubs player.

I was working for a business that had a bunch of Seahawk players as customers in the 90's when then-owner Ken Behring tried to move the team to California. They told me to a man that they were pissed that the NFL stopped the move. They all wanted to go to SoCal and its sunshine. Zero loyalty to Seattle. Not that I blame them, but the loyalty of fans to players who have no loyalty to them, makes no sense.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-12-2014, 04:40 PM
 
6,387 posts, read 3,825,416 times
Reputation: 15053
Most people like to feel a sense of belonging or community. Sports teams are just one way of doing that. It's kind of silly, but it speaks to a very visceral urge. It's even easier than adopting a religion - you just say you're a fan, and nobody's gonna question it too much. You can just buy a t-shirt.

I used to date a big, burly guy who had ridden with a biker gang long before we met and never really lost the look of it. Tattoos, scars, and everything. He was a brilliant and gentle guy who read books on physics for fun, but people literally crossed the street to avoid him when they saw him coming. He could never really grasp the concept of professional sports though. One day he let me know he was going out for a beer with his new co-workers to watch "the game." This amused me greatly, because I knew he was doing it to fit in with his new crew. About an hour after they were to have gotten to the bar, I got a call from his cell phone.

"Babe, help me out here. The Patriots - they're a basketball team, right?" I gasped out the word "football" and proceeded to laugh until he hung up.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-12-2014, 05:27 PM
 
Location: On the "Left Coast", somewhere in "the Land of Fruits & Nuts"
7,328 posts, read 4,113,877 times
Reputation: 4348
Yeah, I musta missed the "sports gene" too somehow, and near as I can tell, it's mostly a "tribal" kinda thang (aka, "my tribe better than your tribe"). But Seattleites often being a fickle and traditionally 'non-joiner' bunch, probably just needed the right combination of winning, team personalities and a resonant team "persona", to finally relate to and get on board! Kinda reminds me of back in the 90's with Mariners fever when Ken Griffey came along (who was also known for being kinda 'cocky')!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-12-2014, 08:18 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,789 posts, read 5,815,542 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by JrzDefector View Post
Most people like to feel a sense of belonging or community. Sports teams are just one way of doing that. It's kind of silly, but it speaks to a very visceral urge. It's even easier than adopting a religion - you just say you're a fan, and nobody's gonna question it too much. You can just buy a t-shirt.

I used to date a big, burly guy who had ridden with a biker gang long before we met and never really lost the look of it. Tattoos, scars, and everything. He was a brilliant and gentle guy who read books on physics for fun, but people literally crossed the street to avoid him when they saw him coming. He could never really grasp the concept of professional sports though. One day he let me know he was going out for a beer with his new co-workers to watch "the game." This amused me greatly, because I knew he was doing it to fit in with his new crew. About an hour after they were to have gotten to the bar, I got a call from his cell phone.

"Babe, help me out here. The Patriots - they're a basketball team, right?" I gasped out the word "football" and proceeded to laugh until he hung up.
Well I'm not a fan of American football, but of our own Australian rules football. I'd say yeah, that's true, tribalism, a sense of belonging, and also because I just find the games exciting, and barracking for a team makes it more fun/exciting because you're invested in it. Hometown pride and all that too. Plus I love the atmosphere of games here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-12-2014, 11:07 PM
 
11,655 posts, read 6,209,928 times
Reputation: 15439
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Well I'm not a fan of American football, but of our own Australian rules football. I'd say yeah, that's true, tribalism, a sense of belonging, and also because I just find the games exciting, and barracking for a team makes it more fun/exciting because you're invested in it. Hometown pride and all that too. Plus I love the atmosphere of games here.
You might need to translate that one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wutitiz View Post
So I live in the Seattle area, and everyone is going crazy about the Seahawks. Co workers show up for work wearing Seahawk Jerseys and hats. I walked to the grocery store today, and the real estate broker on the way had some kind of '12th man' sign in the window. The way I see it: bah, humbug.

It's a fairly bizarre model if you think about it. You've got a bunch of beefy guys paid to basically beat the snot out of each other, and I'm supposed to care because the checks are drawn on Paul Allen's account who lives a few miles away on Mercer Island, WA? Yet clearly the model does work. It worked on me too--growing up as a kid in Illinois I was a rabid Cub fan. My mood for the day was very dependent of how the Cubs did. If they won, I was happy as a clam; if they lost, I was down in the dumps. Today I couldn't tell you the name of one Cubs player.

I was working for a business that had a bunch of Seahawk players as customers in the 90's when then-owner Ken Behring tried to move the team to California. They told me to a man that they were pissed that the NFL stopped the move. They all wanted to go to SoCal and its sunshine. Zero loyalty to Seattle. Not that I blame them, but the loyalty of fans to players who have no loyalty to them, makes no sense.
Like Postman, I too am an Aussie Rules fan. Yes, its a feeling of community, and tribalism I suppose, one of the last reasons to separate yourself from other 'tribes' or areas. But I grew up in a sports mad city where out of the national competition of 18 teams, 11 are based.... that community feeling is strong.

Loyalty does count for something still here, there have been many players who could have moved teams for a greater pay check that play for my team over the years... but didn't.

But my mood isn't affected by a standard games win or loss and never has been. The only time its put me in a down mood was losing grand finals we should have won. After not winning anything for a loooong time, yeah that's a mood killer
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-13-2014, 02:56 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,789 posts, read 5,815,542 times
Reputation: 2833
^ Yep barracking just means supporting or 'rooting for', although here 'rooting' has a different meaning, lol.

Yeah Melbourne is a great sports city, it's not only the sports capital of Australia but one of the top sporting cities in the world. The Australian Open grand slam which just started is played there. But yeah, the VFL/AFL competition in probably made more exciting by long standing rivalries that go back over 100 years. There are some dyed in the wool supporters of a team who have been that way for generations. I'm there there are families like that in the US.

I admit I shed a few tears when my team won the Grand Final (I guess it's like your Superbowl, but less commercialised ). It was so nail-biting, we'd lost the previous year to the same team we were playing and we won by 1 point! I guess they were tears of relief as well. I'm not one to cry easily at all, either. I do get a bit disappointed after a loss and feel in good spirits after a game, but yeah it doesn't really affect my dad to day life all that much, I guess it's nice to feel your team is doing well.

But yeah, I'm sure artemis will agree Aussie rules is the best and most exciting sport on the face of the earth, you Americans are missing out!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-13-2014, 06:46 AM
 
Location: Here
2,752 posts, read 3,803,966 times
Reputation: 4605
There are many who enjoy sports; however, you will find that there are just as many "fair-weather" fans, meaning they are out there cheering for a winning team, but as soon as the team starts losing, those fans disappear.

Right now, as far as the Seahawks, there are many who just want to jump on board and feel as though they are part of the group. It will calm down soon.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-13-2014, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,789 posts, read 5,815,542 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by katie45 View Post
There are many who enjoy sports; however, you will find that there are just as many "fair-weather" fans, meaning they are out there cheering for a winning team, but as soon as the team starts losing, those fans disappear.

Right now, as far as the Seahawks, there are many who just want to jump on board and feel as though they are part of the group. It will calm down soon.
For those people, winning means less...you have to suffer a bit for victory to really mean something. There's no sense of connection, of loyalty.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-13-2014, 08:04 AM
Status: "It's peanut-butter-jelly time, peanut-butter-jelly time!" (set 24 days ago)
 
7,043 posts, read 4,064,426 times
Reputation: 6950
What are you saying? How dare you. No...how...dare...you...!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-13-2014, 10:05 AM
 
Location: On the "Left Coast", somewhere in "the Land of Fruits & Nuts"
7,328 posts, read 4,113,877 times
Reputation: 4348
Quote:
Originally Posted by katie45 View Post
There are many who enjoy sports; however, you will find that there are just as many "fair-weather" fans, meaning they are out there cheering for a winning team, but as soon as the team starts losing, those fans disappear.

Right now, as far as the Seahawks, there are many who just want to jump on board and feel as though they are part of the group. It will calm down soon.
Having somehow missed the "sports gene", that's another part of the whole "tribal thang" that seems curious to me, that it's usually not enuff just to be a "fan" (or 'religious', or 'patriotic', or a 'team player', or whatever…), but you also have to prove that you're a "true believer"!


credits: lol wall, Dave Hodges, istock,
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Psychology
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top