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Old 05-07-2014, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Newport Beach, California
31,385 posts, read 18,420,530 times
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I have a very good friend who is a combat veteran suffers from PTSD. Well, obviously, he has never been formally diagnosed, but all the symptoms he experiences tell me that he needs professional help.

He drinks every single day and he even talks about killing himself.

I told him that he needs to seek professional help to treat PTSD. He said he would seek professional help if he feels like it.

As a friend, what can I do to help? Also, what exactly are the reasons why some Veterans refuse to seek professional help to treat their PTSD?
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Old 05-07-2014, 06:45 PM
 
Location: mainland but born oahu
6,657 posts, read 6,159,032 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lilyflower3191981 View Post
I have a very good friend who is a combat veteran suffers from PTSD. Well, obviously, he has never been formally diagnosed, but all the symptoms he experiences tell me that he needs professional help.

He drinks every single day and he even talks about killing himself.

I told him that he needs to seek professional help to treat PTSD. He said he would seek professional help if he feels like it.

As a friend, what can I do to help? Also, what exactly are the reasons why some Veterans refuse to seek professional help to treat their PTSD?
You really don't have alot of control in this situation. All you can do is encourage your friend to seek the help he needs, you can only lead him to water, you can't make him drink.

Just continue to be a friend, because when the PTSD gets painful enough, your vet friend will need his friends there when he finally seeks help. Who wants to relive the horrors of war on a daily bases to recover from PTSD without being medicated etc?
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Old 05-07-2014, 07:03 PM
 
Location: Newport Beach, California
31,385 posts, read 18,420,530 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hawaiian by heart View Post
You really don't have alot of control in this situation. All you can do is encourage your friend to seek the help he needs, you can only lead him to water, you can't make him drink.

Just continue to be a friend, because when the PTSD gets painful enough, your vet friend will need his friends there when he finally seeks help. Who wants to relive the horrors of war on a daily bases to recover from PTSD without being medicated etc?
I don't understand your last sentence?

He is in a very dangerous zone right now. He talks about killing himself, and he drinks on daily basis. There must be something I can do.
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Old 05-07-2014, 07:30 PM
 
Location: mainland but born oahu
6,657 posts, read 6,159,032 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lilyflower3191981 View Post
I don't understand your last sentence?

He is in a very dangerous zone right now. He talks about killing himself, and he drinks on daily basis. There must be something I can do.
In the last sentence i was basicly saying that you friend is self medicating(drinking) because of the PTSD and thats not working all that great from what your saying? Now imagine getting therapy and dealing with the events that caused the PTSD being sober etc? That can be very overwelming.

Well what do you have in mind lily, what is it you would like to see in terms of getting him help?
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Old 05-07-2014, 07:46 PM
 
Location: Newport Beach, California
31,385 posts, read 18,420,530 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hawaiian by heart View Post
In the last sentence i was basicly saying that you friend is self medicating(drinking) because of the PTSD and thats not working all that great from what your saying? Now imagine getting therapy and dealing with the events that caused the PTSD being sober etc? That can be very overwelming.

Well what do you have in mind lily, what is it you would like to see in terms of getting him help?
well, keep in mind that he is just a friend, he is not my best friend or anything.
I have couple veteran friends who are actively seeking help to treat their PTSD and they have great and solid support system.

This particular friend doesn't have a support group because his family is in other state. He's also sharing custody with his ex wife. Life can be overwhelming sometimes. I do what I can to help, but I don't want to cross the boundaries. We cannot even get him to seek professional help at this moment.
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Old 05-07-2014, 07:58 PM
 
Location: mainland but born oahu
6,657 posts, read 6,159,032 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lilyflower3191981 View Post
well, keep in mind that he is just a friend, he is not my best friend or anything.
I have couple veteran friends who are actively seeking help to treat their PTSD and they have great and solid support system.

This particular friend doesn't have a support group because his family is in other state. He's also sharing custody with his ex wife. Life can be overwhelming sometimes. I do what I can to help, but I don't want to cross the boundaries. We cannot even get him to seek professional help at this moment.
See thats the problem. If he doesn't want help, he wont recover. You could try to force him with ultimatums, that might work at first but if its not personal to him it won't work. If he was a close military brother or was my brother i would try an intervention with all his family, but since your just friends all you can do is educate yourself, be there for him if you choice too and remind him if he seeks help you will be there. Isn't more you can do besides
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Old 05-07-2014, 07:59 PM
 
Location: mainland but born oahu
6,657 posts, read 6,159,032 times
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Besides crossing boundaries.
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Old 05-07-2014, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Newport Beach, California
31,385 posts, read 18,420,530 times
Reputation: 12142
Quote:
Originally Posted by hawaiian by heart View Post
See thats the problem. If he doesn't want help, he wont recover. You could try to force him with ultimatums, that might work at first but if its not personal to him it won't work. If he was a close military brother or was my brother i would try an intervention with all his family, but since your just friends all you can do is educate yourself, be there for him if you choice too and remind him if he seeks help you will be there. Isn't more you can do besides
I don't think it is my place to try intervention. What do you think of leaving a book of PTSD on his table?
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Old 05-07-2014, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Anchorage, Alaska
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The reason a lot of vets don't seek treatment or help for PTSD or depression is because they believe it will make them look weak. There's a very real stigma amongst current and former military about seeking treatment for mental illness that the VA is trying very hard to change. I work as a nurse at a VA clinic and we were told that in day one of orientation. There are signs around the hospital that say "No Stigma" and urge vets to seek help. There are initiatives in place and new clinics are being designed around a model that mental health and primary care are together so no one knows who is being seen by a mental health professional vs. a medical doctor.

As for what you can do to help: being supportive is the best thing but, if that's not enough and you feel that he, based on what he has said, demonstrated, or you have observed, is in imminent danger of hurting himself or someone else, you can call 911. Depending on the laws of your state he can be put under a Temporary Detention Order for up to 72 hours for assessment for suicidal or homicidal ideation. That may be the first step that's needed to get him professional help.
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Old 05-07-2014, 08:19 PM
 
Location: mainland but born oahu
6,657 posts, read 6,159,032 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lilyflower3191981 View Post
I don't think it is my place to try intervention. What do you think of leaving a book of PTSD on his table?
You could leave a book or pamphlets of how to get help and tell him its here if you want help. I agree its not your place to do an intervention unless family members approach you. Wynternight has some good experience.
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