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Old 09-23-2014, 11:46 AM
 
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I'm getting more and more annoyed with people who use a mental health condition, a noun, as an adjective to describe themselves or someone else.

I see and hear this kind of thing a lot:

"I am so OCD about that."

"My son is Asperger's."

"She's a little ADD."

These are conditions that a person HAS, not an adjective to describe who a person IS. I'm not getting into the politically correct thing, which may or may not have some validity, but more the grammatically correct. But it's really both.

You HAVE OCD.
You HAVE Asperger's.
You HAVE ADD.

Would you say "I'm pneumonia"? No, you say "I HAVE pneumonia."
Would you say "He's lung cancer"? No you say "He HAS lung cancer."
Would you say "She's diabetes?" So you say "She HAS diabetes or "She's diabetic (an adjective)."


If you haven't noticed this, I guarantee that after reading my little rant here, you'll notice it all over the place.

In the behavioral health field, there is indeed a movement toward "person first" language. You shouldn't call someone "a schizophrenic" but a "person with schizophrenia." Even with non-mental health disorders, you should call a person an "epileptic" but a "person with epilepsy."

But what I'm complaining about is even more extreme. Not only are they labeling a person (or themselves) with the disorder, but they are saying the person IS the disorder. Like saying "he is schizophrenia" or "she is epilepsy."

I swear, I've heard "I'm really OCD" so many times I could bang my head into a wall. It's not only politically incorrect, but grammatically incorrect, and sadly ironic. Do they realize they are claiming to be both obsessive and compulsive, but then they are using a noun as an adjective without blinking an eye? A person who REALLY has OCD would laugh at these people and consider them pathetic.

Anyway, it's not the biggest issue in the world, but if it were, I wouldn't be venting about it on an online forum. But it's goddamn annoying nonetheless. Okay, I'm done.
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Old 09-23-2014, 11:59 AM
 
Location: FROM Dixie, but IN SoCal
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This is fairly common in the healthcare arena. You'll sometimes hear the nursing staff, physical therapists, etc., refer to "the gall bladder in Room 214", or "the fracture in 324." They know they're not supposed to do that, but they slip up and do it anyway. Its a form of "verbal shorthand", if you'll pardon the term.

You're correct, TracySam, people should not refer to themselves or others as though they were the disease or condition they have. Be that as it may, people are going to do it from time to time.

In any unacceptable situation there are only three healthy choices: (a) accept it, (b) change it, or (c) get out of it. There's no way to get out of it, short of becoming a hermit. You're not likely to change it. That only leaves one healthy choice.

Regards,

-- Nighteyes
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Old 09-23-2014, 12:04 PM
 
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Quote:
"I am so OCD about that."
I've heard this one and my understanding is that it's just a figure of speech. I don't think the person who says this means they have the full blown disorder but that there are certain things that they are neurotic about.

Quote:
"My son is Asperger's."
I have honestly never heard anyone use this phrase in this way. It is always used in the context of "My son has Asperger's".

Quote:
"She's a little ADD."
Now this is just poor grammar. Though I have heard this phrase used very rarely.

Last edited by Ro2113; 09-23-2014 at 12:22 PM..
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Old 09-23-2014, 12:08 PM
 
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But these are not healthcare professionals who are saying "I'm so ADD today" or "He's a little OCD." If it was a nurse saying she had "an MI" in room B last night, or something like that, I'd have no problem with it.

Ugh, I know I can't change it; that's why I vented. Hopefully there's at least one other person out there who gets annoyed by this. I don't have to accept it--I can still complain. It's even coming up on TV. It's as bad as when people say "don't hate on me." Why on earth is that "on" inserted in there?

Next it'll be "I'm OCD, don't hate on me." It could be a song.
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Old 09-23-2014, 12:09 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ro2113 View Post
I've heard this one and my understanding is that it's just a figure of speech. I don't thing the person who says means they have the full blown disorder but that there's something that they are neurotic about.
But my point is not whether or not they meet the criteria for OCD, it's that they say "I am OCD." Might be a figure of speech, but some figures of speech make people look like completely illiterate idiots.
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Old 09-23-2014, 12:25 PM
 
8,018 posts, read 6,615,807 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TracySam View Post
But my point is not whether or not they meet the criteria for OCD, it's that they say "I am OCD." Might be a figure of speech, but some figures of speech make people look like completely illiterate idiots.
I guess it's how you look at it. I've never really given it a second thought. Maybe it's more convenient to say "I am OCD about this or that" instead of saying "I am neurotic about this or that".
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Old 09-23-2014, 01:08 PM
 
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I think the "I'm so OCD about that" is just a figure of speech. Otherwise, I totally agree with OP that patients, not the medical community so much, for some reason, like to identify themselves with a disorder/disease and have their entire identity immersed in a diagnosis. Why this is? Anybody's guess. My opinion is that society, in general, has gone down the road of explaining away everything to an external focus, like a pill, or a diagnosis, etc. Then they lack the understanding that they must take responsibility for themselves, their behavior, their treatment, etc., but would rather have someone else take responsibility for them. "I just need to be on the right medication" [there is no right medication], "I think I've been misdiagnosed, everyone tells me I'm Bipolar" [when there's no criteria for Bipolar], "I don't have a drinking problem, if you would just treat me for depression with the right medication, I wouldn't drink", angry patients, parents and families that don't want to hear the problem is behavioral and need therapy when they want a diagnosis and a pill, it's an epidemic in medicine and behavioral health. But it goes beyond, it is more and more common for families to drop their elderly off at emergency rooms, washing their hands, and saying "they're your problem now", it's true believe it or not, society is evolving into a narcissistic playing field where it's all about me, *********, and it's not my responsibility!
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Old 09-23-2014, 01:36 PM
 
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People talk like that? WOW! I had no idea.

I say, I am depressed (not I am depression).
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Old 09-23-2014, 01:41 PM
 
Location: So Ca
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TracySam View Post
my point is not whether or not they meet the criteria for OCD, it's that they say "I am OCD."
You're absolutely right. "H/She's bipolar" seems to apply to anyone with a mood swing these days.
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Old 09-23-2014, 02:22 PM
 
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But at least "bipolar" is an adjective. So even though it's not politically correct, or perhaps healthy, to say "I'm bipolar," it's at least grammatically correct. If they were saying "I'm bipolar disorder," that's the issue I'm talking about. Saying "I'm OCD" is saying "I am obsessive-compulsive disorder." They should instead say "I have obsessive-compulsive disorder."
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