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Old 12-21-2014, 06:44 PM
 
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
403 posts, read 456,379 times
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The vast majority of the people that I know are unable to, with them believing that they are exactly the same thing (which they are not). A knowledgeable individual is one who knows a bunch of things (pointing this out is obviously knowledge), while intelligence is more genetic (possibly obtained, which is a common debate), with it being more of the long term (since it can diminish when one is in their 80s-90s) ability to apply/integrate knowledge/logic/etc. (with them being able to grasp things at a quicker pace), and I would say that a quick-witted individual would actually be more insightful on the subjects as well, over the individual who is just knowledgeable would be on average. However, that being said, an individual who possesses an intelligence quotient of let's say 84 who is more knowledgeable, with the other having an intelligence quotient of 116 (with less knowledge), will obviously come off as being more intellectual than them from far away.

In the end, I would say that being highly intelligent pays off more, but lacking knowledge could greatly impact an individual as well. I do think that there are several forms of intelligence that people generally do overlook, however.
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Old 12-21-2014, 07:54 PM
 
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I've seen people with college degrees, who are good at remembering information (long enough to take the test), but can't figure out how to change a tire on a car nor budget their money. These people are quite knowledgeable.

Others may never have been trained to do a certain thing, do not have a college degree for the subject in question, but can do it much better than anyone else. They just walk up and teach themselves how to operate something or figure out how to do something on their own.

A good test is to have one of those old VCR's on a table constantly blinking 12:00, then have the subject enter the room - ask them to set the time on the VCR. The intelligent types will do this with a quickness. But almost impossible for the knowledgeable types.
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Old 12-22-2014, 08:31 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
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I don't think they are the same thing, but they appear to be closely linked. Intelligent people tend to be curious and they pick up information and end up knowledgeable.

Knowledgeable people tend to also be smart people. Low IQ people don't store as much information, unless it is something they are really interested in. There are low IQ people who are a whiz at their favorite hobby or their job.

People appear to have a lot of brain power that they never use (all people). Putting knowledge permanently into your brain for storage takes effort, and so I would say that people who are not knowledgeable about much of anything are mentally lazy more so than they are low intelligence.
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Old 12-22-2014, 10:16 AM
 
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I am both intelligent and knowledgeable, but that doesn't necessarily make me smart.

Intelligence gives me the capabilities to research and gain knowledge, but being smart or not is in how you utilize that knowledge.
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Old 12-22-2014, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Purgatory
6,322 posts, read 4,784,319 times
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Yup, its intelligent quotient (IQ) vs aptitude.

Aptitude can entice someone into thinking that you have a high IQ when actually you only have aptitude in certain subjects (eg, you're well traveled, well read, etc.)

A lot of people who grew up "with money" can appear on the surface to have a higher IQ merely because their wealth exposed them to more things.

Someone might be seen as "intelligent" for knowing all of the capitals of Europe for example because s/he travels a lot. The person who all of the streets they sell drugs on in her neighborhood has equivocal knowledge. One set of knowledge is just more useful to a greater number of people and therefore (erroneously) seen as "intelligent."
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Old 12-22-2014, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Somewhere
8,071 posts, read 5,416,449 times
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Fluid and crystallized intelligence - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Fluid intelligence or fluid reasoning is the capacity to think logically and solve problems in novel situations, independent of acquired knowledge

Crystallized intelligence is the ability to use skills, knowledge, and experience. It does not equate to memory, but it does rely on accessing information from long-term memory


Like the other poster said, someone who is not very bright will probably have a difficult time recalling learned information. What most of us think as "intelligence" is usually "fluid intelligence" I have only met one person who I thought had exceptional fluid intelligence in my life, a guy in college who was studying computer science. I was shocked how easily this guy learned concepts. That's when I realized people with very high IQs do actually exist and they don't process information the same way we do.
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Old 12-23-2014, 12:09 AM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
22,116 posts, read 14,526,993 times
Reputation: 31251
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seahawksfan33 View Post
The vast majority of the people that I know are unable to, with them believing that they are exactly the same thing (which they are not). A knowledgeable individual is one who knows a bunch of things (pointing this out is obviously knowledge), while intelligence is more genetic (possibly obtained, which is a common debate), with it being more of the long term (since it can diminish when one is in their 80s-90s) ability to apply/integrate knowledge/logic/etc. (with them being able to grasp things at a quicker pace), and I would say that a quick-witted individual would actually be more insightful on the subjects as well, over the individual who is just knowledgeable would be on average. However, that being said, an individual who possesses an intelligence quotient of let's say 84 who is more knowledgeable, with the other having an intelligence quotient of 116 (with less knowledge), will obviously come off as being more intellectual than them from far away.

In the end, I would say that being highly intelligent pays off more, but lacking knowledge could greatly impact an individual as well. I do think that there are several forms of intelligence that people generally do overlook, however.
I can if I get to know someone. But honestly the less intelligent are not usually not knowledgeable, at least not about many things. You figure out someone isn't terribly smart by their actions, and often by how they communicate.

But, no matter how smart or not, someone is, he or she is entitled to civility and respect.

Even the smartest people we know are less intelligent than lots of other people. It is all relative.

For me one of the surest signs of intelligence is curiosity.
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Old 12-23-2014, 12:20 AM
 
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
403 posts, read 456,379 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
I can if I get to know someone. But honestly the less intelligent are not usually not knowledgeable, at least not about many things. You figure out someone isn't terribly smart by their actions, and often by how they communicate.

But, no matter how smart or not, someone is, he or she is entitled to civility and respect.

Even the smartest people we know are less intelligent than lots of other people. It is all relative.

For me one of the surest signs of intelligence is curiosity.
I agree, and it's ironic because of the fact that the vast majority of the individuals believe that curiosity makes them the opposite. I think that the average human being is more knowledgeable than they are intelligence.
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Old 12-23-2014, 04:45 AM
 
Location: Earth
4,565 posts, read 3,820,828 times
Reputation: 6911
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
I don't think they are the same thing, but they appear to be closely linked. Intelligent people tend to be curious and they pick up information and end up knowledgeable.

Knowledgeable people tend to also be smart people. Low IQ people don't store as much information, unless it is something they are really interested in. There are low IQ people who are a whiz at their favorite hobby or their job.

People appear to have a lot of brain power that they never use (all people). Putting knowledge permanently into your brain for storage takes effort, and so I would say that people who are not knowledgeable about much of anything are mentally lazy more so than they are low intelligence.
Seems like what someone said is the difference between a nerd and a geek. The former has general intelligence, book smarts, are studious and good with learning in general. But a geek is someone who is a genius in a certain field, but may not known squat about much else, and don't care or bother with it unless it becomes something they could be interested in.
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Old 12-24-2014, 12:48 PM
 
Location: On the "Left Coast", somewhere in "the Land of Fruits & Nuts"
8,367 posts, read 8,612,494 times
Reputation: 5924
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sugah Ray View Post
Fluid and crystallized intelligence - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Fluid intelligence or fluid reasoning is the capacity to think logically and solve problems in novel situations, independent of acquired knowledge

Crystallized intelligence is the ability to use skills, knowledge, and experience. It does not equate to memory, but it does rely on accessing information from long-term memory


Like the other poster said, someone who is not very bright will probably have a difficult time recalling learned information. What most of us think as "intelligence" is usually "fluid intelligence" I have only met one person who I thought had exceptional fluid intelligence in my life, a guy in college who was studying computer science. I was shocked how easily this guy learned concepts. That's when I realized people with very high IQs do actually exist and they don't process information the same way we do.
Yeah, aside from the issue of the different "kinds of intelligence", the big distinction between "knowledge" and "intelligence" seems to be in the ability to apply knowledge in useful ways, and most especially the intuitive ability to see the larger connections and patterns in knowledge, whether in music, math, science, people, whatever. Sorta like the difference between seeing things at the hundred foot and the thousand foot levels. And also as previously noted, 'curiosity' often seems to 'come with the territory'.

BTW, here's an excellent sci fi short story still available online, that imagines what extraordinary intelligence might look like…

"Understand" by Ted Chiang
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