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Old Yesterday, 09:34 PM
 
Location: SoCal
2,351 posts, read 2,007,552 times
Reputation: 1926

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Quote:
Originally Posted by turkeydance View Post
Why so many ANYthing?

pets, books, Beanie Babies....whatever.

we have too many books and we know it.
they are even stored under our bed.
but...it is our right to do so.
Books aren't alive so that's irrelevant. I missed the beanie part of babies lol sorry about that.

Last edited by sean1the1; Yesterday at 10:10 PM..
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Old Yesterday, 09:35 PM
 
Location: I am right here.
4,883 posts, read 3,827,544 times
Reputation: 15401
I prefer my 3 cats and 1 dog to most people. They provide entertainment, cuddles, snuggles, bug removal, and good belly laughs. The y are so entertaining. I enjoy them so much. As I sit here tonight surfin the net, my big Maine Coon is curled up in my lap. My kitten is stalking various things, real and imagined, in the room.

Dogs are social animals who want to be with their "pack". I and my cats are my dog's pack. My cats are much safer inside my house than outside. There are too many coyotes, hawks, eagles, cars, and mean people.

Last vet bill for my cat was $200. That is why I work. She is worth it.
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Old Yesterday, 10:05 PM
 
9,881 posts, read 7,669,362 times
Reputation: 24203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Debsi View Post
Of course animals can feel love. This is an old stereotype that really needs to be put to rest, based on outdated science. All mammals certainly have emotions. You could also interpret human relationships the same way you just did ó when two humans hug, certain hormones are released in the brain causing them to feel good. Itís just a hormone payoff, not love.
I believe what humans call love and what animals engage in within their own species are two different things.

I have no problem believing animals engage in "emotional" responses within their own species.

I'm a human. I know what I need to be loved. I'm not going to delude myself to believe I can get that from a dog or cat.

A dog coming when a human yells is conditioning.
A cat jumping in a person's lap could be simple amusement for the cat.

None of this translates into love back from the animal.

Now, I believe humans can project their needs onto animals and interpret animal responses as "love."

Also, in order for love to be true, it has to be a free will choice. Animals or more specifically, PETS are captive beings. They never chose to "love" their humans. They are just living and behaving within the confines of their captivity. Open your fence and see what happens.

Oh, and before anyone quotes a story of a runaway dog that returned home after xx amount of time, in nature, animals create habitats and migrate and return every year by instinct. Your home has just become their habitat.

One last thing, someone left this comment without their name:

Quote:
Yes, animals respond to their environment WITH LOVE if it's a loving environment! Honestly, I feel sorry for you if you don't "get" that
.
No need to feel sorry for me. I'm not living under any delusions. A loving environment? How many trashy people do you know who have pets?
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Old Yesterday, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Southern California
20,485 posts, read 6,816,100 times
Reputation: 13797
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeachSalsa View Post
I prefer my 3 cats and 1 dog to most people. They provide entertainment, cuddles, snuggles, bug removal, and good belly laughs. The y are so entertaining. I enjoy them so much. As I sit here tonight surfin the net, my big Maine Coon is curled up in my lap. My kitten is stalking various things, real and imagined, in the room.

Dogs are social animals who want to be with their "pack". I and my cats are my dog's pack. My cats are much safer inside my house than outside. There are too many coyotes, hawks, eagles, cars, and mean people.

Last vet bill for my cat was $200. That is why I work. She is worth it.
Everyone has their needs and wants, Choices.
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Old Yesterday, 10:17 PM
 
Location: Southern California
20,485 posts, read 6,816,100 times
Reputation: 13797
Quote:
Originally Posted by hunterseat View Post
I'm not sure what kind of vet you are used to visiting that smells like anything other than a medical clinic. Good veterinarian offices don't stink.
I use good litter and clean the box daily so there's no cat smell. I only have one. I went to our awesome shelter and asked for the oldest, least likely to be adopted. And he loves me as evidenced by his desire to be on me every chance, his kneading, rubbing and purring.
I've had the same 2 dogs for about 13yrs. They're worth whatever I've spent on them.
Animals have always been a part of my life.
Okay I have a horse...did I mention that? He's at a retirement farm.
I start to feel itchy reading your post. Thinking about a friend who is now gone, but her cat slept on her chest most nights, excuse me while I sneeze...
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Old Today, 12:18 AM
 
Location: on the wind
4,997 posts, read 1,930,748 times
Reputation: 17647
People have different motivations for keeping different animals. They also get different benefits from different animals. As someone who usually has a bit of a zoo, it makes sense to me. I don't expect the same things from a dog that I do a reptile, bird, or aquarium fish. I don't delude myself into believing all these different animals want or need the same level of interaction with me either. The animals I have get what is suited for them, not me. They are not surrogate children, babies that never grow up, or toys. They are living creatures I enjoy having in my day-to-day life.

I keep aviary birds; not the so-called "companion" birds like a hand raised parrot that is emotionally very dependent on a human's interaction, though I have had a few rescue parrots in the past. My aviary birds provide beauty and inspiration as they live out their lives with their mates. Their primary relationships are with each other. I get to observe at close range. They are visually lovely and have beautiful voices. The biologist in me is fascinated with their behavior and beauty. Plus, designing the aviary to give them a decent quality of life is fulfilling.

I usually have at least one dog and that is for companionship as I live alone (in terms of humans anyway ). My dog is fun to take on drives, to the beach, hiking or camping, teaching skills to, and we enjoy each other's presence. Something that cares if I am alive.

I've kept various reptiles over the years. Many were rescued from abusive situations. I can give them a more peaceful existence free from fear. Biologically they are very interesting and beautiful, but they don't necessarily take as much daily attention as birds do. Again, researching and designing comfortable living spaces for them is a pleasure. I also take them to schools and other kids programs as a teaching tool. The interaction with the kids and watching them discover something new is a true joy.

There are certainly people who have no interest in sharing their lives with animals, wouldn't want to spend money or time on them, or those who are so focused on themselves to the point no other creature is worth any of their attention. If that's what works for them well, it takes all sorts. I just don't happen to be one of them.

Last edited by Parnassia; Today at 12:56 AM..
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Old Today, 12:29 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,907 posts, read 26,750,763 times
Reputation: 27231
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
Animals don't give love. Animals respond to their environment and owners perceive that response as love in order to meet their emotional needs.
Maybe not ...


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B0Y-GU3JqiQ
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Old Today, 12:59 AM
Status: "Boycotting idiots." (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Here and now.
11,246 posts, read 3,135,762 times
Reputation: 12149
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
I start to feel itchy reading your post. Thinking about a friend who is now gone, but her cat slept on her chest most nights, excuse me while I sneeze...
For a person who loves to talk about choices, you seem to be awfully critical of people who do choose to live with pets. You've made it very clear that you do not, and that's fine, but the superior attitude you appear to be expressing in some of your comments is...I'm not sure what. Is there a point to it?
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Old Today, 02:14 AM
 
Location: interior Alaska
4,064 posts, read 3,063,091 times
Reputation: 12219
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
I noticed that several people mentioned ferrets. Ferrets seem to be the new pet fad. A friend of mine got a ferret years ago, when she already had two big fluffy dog, some breed I'd never seen before. She also had a cat or two. But she said ferrets are very delicate and tricky to care for, and they're not very long-lived? I'm not sure wha the point is. I guess they're the New Age hamster, or something.
If anything I associate ferrets with back-in-the-day hippies. They've been a moderately common pet for decades. I certainly remember pet stores carrying them when I was a little kid, so they're nothing new. I personally don't want them, but I can see the appeal. They have a goofy temperament a lot like a kitten or puppy, are relatively intelligent, and like playing and interacting with people, which makes them more fun and engaging than typical little cage pets, most of which do better with minimal handling. But they sleep upwards of 20 hours per day and can spend quite a bit of their time caged, which generally makes them less needy than a dog or friendly cat. So I don't think they're a particularly weird choice in a pet, unless you're the kind of person who thinks it's weird to want pets at all.
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Old Today, 03:13 AM
 
Location: interior Alaska
4,064 posts, read 3,063,091 times
Reputation: 12219
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
I believe what humans call love and what animals engage in within their own species are two different things.

I have no problem believing animals engage in "emotional" responses within their own species.
Obviously the relationship between a dog and a human is different than the relationship between a human and a human in many ways. But we've selectively bred dogs for both neoteny and the ability to 'read' humans, causing them to interact with us much like wolf pups interact with adult wolves. (Heck, we've even selectively bred certain types of dogs to bond with livestock and whatnot.) I don't think it's a stretch that dogs are capable of engaging in emotional responses outside their species after thousands of years of selecting for just that capacity.

Quote:
Also, in order for love to be true, it has to be a free will choice. Animals or more specifically, PETS are captive beings. They never chose to "love" their humans. They are just living and behaving within the confines of their captivity. Open your fence and see what happens.

Oh, and before anyone quotes a story of a runaway dog that returned home after xx amount of time, in nature, animals create habitats and migrate and return every year by instinct. Your home has just become their habitat.
So if they run off, that's proof they're dumb animals, and if they don't run off, that's also proof they're dumb animals? Convenient for your worldview, that.

If not "contained" some dogs will run off, some will roam and come home, some will roam and try to come home but lack the survival skills to do so, and some will stick close to home. It really depends on the individual animal and the breed/type tendencies.

A typical dog has intelligence akin to that of a human toddler. (Note that I am not saying a dog is akin to a toddler overall - but they have a similar level of ability to plan, retain information, etc.) If you let a toddler outside unattended and he or she wanders off, do you conclude that small children aren't capable of love or attachment to humans? There are reasons other than lack of affection that a person or animal might stray from home.
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