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Old 02-18-2019, 07:13 AM
 
12,018 posts, read 6,622,146 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GiGi603 View Post
I don't know or have I ever known a pet owner like this.
I have known people who have a yard dog. I believe they are there to make noise if any intruders come around. They live outside with a dog house for shelter.

The mentality is often associated with the concept that animals are here for our use, whatever that may be.

The children of the yard dog family I knew, grew up to have disposable pets due to that mentality. They would see a cute puppy, have it for a while, get rid of it, get a cat, move and leave it with someone else, get another animal, etc.... they are really gung ho when the animal is new, and post a million photos of their "sweetie", then talk about how they miss them after they get rid of it, and they actually get sympathy.
So the use for the animal in this instance is sympathetic attention seeking, almost like Munchausens, where the animal is a prop for their attention seeking.

There are plenty of wackos out there abusing animals, so someone merely ignoring a pet is not out of the scope of reason for human behavior.
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Old 02-18-2019, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Texas or Cascais, Portugal
3,402 posts, read 3,160,372 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tamajane View Post
I have known people who have a yard dog. I believe they are there to make noise if any intruders come around. They live outside with a dog house for shelter.

The mentality is often associated with the concept that animals are here for our use, whatever that may be.

The children of the yard dog family I knew, grew up to have disposable pets due to that mentality. They would see a cute puppy, have it for a while, get rid of it, get a cat, move and leave it with someone else, get another animal, etc.... they are really gung ho when the animal is new, and post a million photos of their "sweetie", then talk about how they miss them after they get rid of it, and they actually get sympathy.
So the use for the animal in this instance is sympathetic attention seeking, almost like Munchausens, where the animal is a prop for their attention seeking.

There are plenty of wackos out there abusing animals, so someone merely ignoring a pet is not out of the scope of reason for human behavior.
I have known folks like this as we have neighbors that have “yard dog””s” on six foot chains tied to a dog house. They feed and water the dogs and nothing else. What a miserable existence for a dog. And the folks who get a puppy, refuse to train it, then get rid of it within s couple of years because it “won’t listen”. They dispose of animals like they dispose of trash, not a second thought. Very sad.
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Old 02-18-2019, 09:26 AM
 
Location: West Coast U.S.A.
492 posts, read 204,904 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nobodysbusiness View Post
In the bible it says something that some people interpret as humans being superior to all other beings (having "dominion" over everyone and everything). Some people have interpreted this as animals being "lessor" - not having feelings - "just a dog," etc., so then they treat them like they might treat a piece of furniture - they don't perceive them as anything worthy of affection . . .
I knew someone who thought animals didn't have real thoughts. He kind of looked on them as instinctual automatons. I was shocked and perplexed, but my theory is that he either didn't grow up around animals or his parents taught him that viewpoint. He did base his life on the Bible too, so that may have played a part.
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Old 02-18-2019, 10:11 AM
 
12,018 posts, read 6,622,146 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Angry-Koala View Post
I knew someone who thought animals didn't have real thoughts. He kind of looked on them as instinctual automatons. I was shocked and perplexed, but my theory is that he either didn't grow up around animals or his parents taught him that viewpoint. He did base his life on the Bible too, so that may have played a part.
I hated the sacrificial lamb. Grew to be a real fan of sheep and love to attend the herding and shearing events. Sheep are really cool. I'm glad they can provide us their wool so we don't eat all of them.

I used to rescue small animals and was lectured on the circle of life and animals are only important if they do something for people from certain Christians I worked with. One time I took an injured sparrow I found in the parking lot inside until I could get it to the wildlife rehab and it was like they didn't get it.
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Old 02-18-2019, 10:49 AM
 
6,353 posts, read 2,280,949 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UsAll View Post
Why are there people having a dog (or cat) as a pet and yet you can see them day after day after day after week after month after year after multiple years at a time with their pet & you seemingly NEVER see them showing any degree of demonstrative affection or love to their animals? Why take it upon yourself to have an animal AT ALL (with the time, expense, and commitments it demands of you to tend to the needs of such a pet) and yet, to anyone's observations over the course of time, you seemingly never hug, kiss, stroke, rub, cuddle, and otherwise show other acts of apparent love for your possessed pet? It seems as though some (or many?) of them are even seemingly annoyed or nonplussed to have to tend to this animal. Then why have one AT ALL if it so non-plusses you? I've encountered this phenomenon varied times over the course of six-something decades of living to-date (thus far).

A most strange phenomenon!

How about you? How you noticed this over the course of time with some of your fellow humans and wondered about it?

I have to wonder if these were people living in the same house as you? Otherwise...how would you know they NEVER over the course of decades show affection toward their pets?
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Old 02-18-2019, 10:57 AM
 
6,353 posts, read 2,280,949 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
My rescue rat terrier loves everyone. The only downside to that, is that she insists on licking everyone's faces. And, if you stand up to discourage her, she will jump up and continue to try to kiss your face. If you bend down and say, "Oh it's alright," even after I warn you that she will try to kiss your face against your will, she will attack your face with her tongue. This will include her trying to stick her tongue down your throat.

Now, don't try to downplay my description of this, or my warning to people as to how she behaves. She will absolutely do her best to attack your face - only with the intent of kissing it - but she won't give up. And, that will include her doing her absolute, terrier-stubborn best - to stick her tongue into your mouth.

I rescued her and I don't have her around other people enough to go through extensive training as to this behavior. But, I'm telling you that people don't listen to me.

So, I don't take her around other people. When people come to visit in my apartment, I put her in her crate. I will sometimes let her out of the crate, after people beg me to, but then I have to hold onto her leash and not let her attack people's faces. They, inevitably, say it's fine, but, it's not really fine. They think I'm being restrictive by holding onto the collar. But, if she gets the best of me and actually does get to their faces and licks them and sticks her tongue down their throat, they then say, "Whoa, okay, that was intense..." as if they hadn't had a warning and my dog was out of control, etc.

Just saying, there is a reason my dog isn't allowed around anyone else but me, at least in any way where she can misbehave.

When nobody else is around, which is most of the time, she is curled up next to me, or really happy to be with me at our secret park where she can chase squirrels off-leash, etc. She's the sweetest, smartest dog I've ever co-habitated with, and she even sleeps in my bed with me. But, I do my best to keep her away from other people, because she doesn't understand that the rules between her and me, also apply to everyone else. She thinks that every individual needs to set individual boundaries, apparently.

So, you might want to think twice about how people treat their animals. There might be a reason you never thought of.

When I was a kid, growing up, our neighbors had a terrier type dog...might've been a rat terrier, "Popsi" that LOVED LOVED LOVED kids. So much so that if we were playing in the yard, and she was in the yard, she would chase us try to knock us down, and then do her level best to lick our faces.


Often, we'd be laying on the ground, trying to cover our heads, giggling away as Popsi was trying to get to our faces. LOL
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Old 02-18-2019, 11:11 AM
 
3,221 posts, read 1,305,286 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tamajane View Post
I hated the sacrificial lamb. Grew to be a real fan of sheep and love to attend the herding and shearing events. Sheep are really cool. I'm glad they can provide us their wool so we don't eat all of them.

I used to rescue small animals and was lectured on the circle of life and animals are only important if they do something for people from certain Christians I worked with. One time I took an injured sparrow I found in the parking lot inside until I could get it to the wildlife rehab and it was like they didn't get it.
Sheep are nice animals, but I HATE the shearing events because of the fact that all their tails are gone. It's like declawing cats and bothered me so much I didn't enjoy anything.
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Old 02-18-2019, 12:51 PM
 
352 posts, read 303,440 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYC refugee View Post
Sheep are nice animals, but I HATE the shearing events because of the fact that all their tails are gone. It's like declawing cats and bothered me so much I didn't enjoy anything.
There are some correlations, but tail docking is believed to have positive health implications for the sheep. It's done to minimize fly strike and blowfly infestations of the tail. Particularly since sheep have woolly tails, which tend to build up with all sorts of nasty stuff. I've seen the result of those infestations, and it's enough to make one gag.

Wild sheep tend not to have the super woolly tail than domesticated sheep have, and have shorter tails overall, so this isn't typically an issue for them.

I'm not saying it's a pleasant event for the sheep, but the alternative can be a lot worse.
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Old 02-18-2019, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Washington state
5,351 posts, read 2,721,701 times
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Feral cats can take a long time to tame if they're truly feral and some never tame down. They get close to people and can be affectionate, but they don't always allow themselves to be touched. I noticed that with the wild raccoons I used to feed, too. They were as affectionate as wild raccoons could be, greeted me when I came home and had no hesitation in putting their little paws all over me and hanging out with me on the back porch. They also showed no hesitation about coming in the house to live with me (had to draw the line on that!). But they weren't tame and I couldn't touch any of them. If I reached out a hand and touched them, they reacted like they'd been shocked.

I did tame a feral cat who came to live with me when I moved into my house and she would allow me to pick her up and pet her, and she was very affectionate. But she couldn't be inside. Shut the door and she'd go bananas. She was strictly an outdoor cat.

And I don't think you could say that all outside dogs are neglected. Look at the Iditarod dogs. They're outside dogs and they're acclimated to be outside. As one musher said, when she brings them in where it's warm, it sounds like a train going down the tracks. But the mushers have to have a bond with their dogs and from what I can see, they love them as much as anyone can love a dog.
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Old 02-18-2019, 04:53 PM
 
56 posts, read 19,242 times
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We have neighbors whose house is a revolving door for dogs/cats. Started with the mom, now she's moved but the young adult kids with their kids continue the same pattern. They always have one or the other or both. These adults seem to do this for their kids. So the kids can hug and pet something until their attention returns to an electronic device. Sometimes there is a litter of kittens or puppies that they're having, I assume under the guise of 'so the kids can have the experience'.


Years ago we were walking into our place and heard the older mother tell one of the kids to go look for their cat. We had recently seen a cat that looked like theirs on the side of the street(dead) a 1/4 mile away. We discreetly told her that we saw a cat that looked like theirs on the side of the road (and where) and then tried to mind our own business. I believe they went to check, but didn't bother to pickup the cat and it laid there for a few days until the city came and took it away.
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