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Old 07-02-2019, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Shreveport, LA
1,303 posts, read 985,888 times
Reputation: 630

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I may be a little biased as I am "investigative-artistic" (both categories are full of tasks that sound fun and engaging to me) with a moderate amount of "enterprising-social" thrown in on the side ("enterprising-social" appeals to me somewhat but a lot of that is "do this or you are a bad person" type work and there is a lot in those two categories that are not my idea of a "good time"), but I have zero interest whatsoever in what Holland describes as "conventional-realistic". "Conventional-realistic" jobs make me want to flay my own skin rather than even think about doing them and the jobs described as "conventional-realistic" seem like universally hated jobs in my social circle. When I was pharmacy technician, I hated it and was bad at it and its described as a "primarily conventional, secondarily realistic" job, and other jobs that had "conventional-realistic" or "realistic-conventional" as their top two "work styles" according to their Holland Code designation sounded like meaningless drudgery somebody would only take on as employment if they were desperate for work and on the brink of destitution.

My question is this: Are there actually people who are predominantly conventional and/or realistic and do they actually like the jobs Holland classified as conventional-realistic or realistic-conventional? Is there anybody on this forum who is predominantly realistic and/or conventional?

To be honest, the conventional and realistic mindsets are so alien to me I cannot imagine anybody actually enjoying that kind of work, or even tolerating it for that matter.

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Old 07-02-2019, 11:58 PM
 
Location: Shreveport, LA
1,303 posts, read 985,888 times
Reputation: 630
My thing is it seems weird to me somebody would get excited over something like “splitting rocks in a quarry” or “using a calculator” or “counting pills for a prescription” or “using a handheld computer to take inventory”. I understand the value of those tasks, but to me, they seem like chores instead of a “dream job”. If Holland Code is correct, there are people who actually enjoy those mind numbing, often repetitive, and sometimes physically demanding tasks.

Has anybody ever known anybody who was excited to do those tasks? I find the existence of people who like “conventional” and “realistic” tasks incredulous.
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Old 07-03-2019, 05:31 AM
 
Location: Central IL
15,201 posts, read 8,509,345 times
Reputation: 35593
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magic Qwan View Post
My thing is it seems weird to me somebody would get excited over something like “splitting rocks in a quarry” or “using a calculator” or “counting pills for a prescription” or “using a handheld computer to take inventory”. I understand the value of those tasks, but to me, they seem like chores instead of a “dream job”. If Holland Code is correct, there are people who actually enjoy those mind numbing, often repetitive, and sometimes physically demanding tasks.

Has anybody ever known anybody who was excited to do those tasks? I find the existence of people who like “conventional” and “realistic” tasks incredulous.
A few people may actually be "excited" by those tasks but it may be more likely that some people find them more bearable than others so they can put up with it. Maybe they like routine and mundane physical tasks because it frees up their mind for other stuff?

Also, realize that many jobs are mixes of different tasks - if you're a coder you may need great math/logic skills and creativity in applying them, but you also have to do a lot of drudge in debugging - it's not all fun!

But yeah, just be thankful if you can do the kind of work that appeals to you, whatever it is.
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Old 07-03-2019, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Shreveport, LA
1,303 posts, read 985,888 times
Reputation: 630
Quote:
Originally Posted by reneeh63 View Post
A few people may actually be "excited" by those tasks but it may be more likely that some people find them more bearable than others so they can put up with it. Maybe they like routine and mundane physical tasks because it frees up their mind for other stuff?

Also, realize that many jobs are mixes of different tasks - if you're a coder you may need great math/logic skills and creativity in applying them, but you also have to do a lot of drudge in debugging - it's not all fun!

But yeah, just be thankful if you can do the kind of work that appeals to you, whatever it is.
I am a school teacher and I like it much better than being a pharmacy tech (which is mostly clerical work but sometimes requires a little physical labor too). However, even teaching has much more paperwork than I’d like, and even though I like working with people and helping them to an extent (I tolerate working with people) sometimes I feel like my students are a bunch of idiot ingrates and that tries my patience a little.

I continue to do creative work on the side (writing, painting, drawing, animation, and I’m looking at teaching myself drumming) but so far only one of my books has made me any money, and it was modest money at that. My other work usually ends up not gathering any money whatsoever, though I enjoy creating these peices as it lets me explore ideas in a “sandbox” environment. I also continue to research topics of interests and try to learn new things (which is hard on the internet these days since you have to sift through mountains of crap to find nuggets of reliable information).

What I think makes mundane physical tasks so difficult is I have bad treatment-resistant ADHD-PI, treatment-resistant dysthymia, and treatment-resistant sluggish cognitive tempo, so to do unengaging and/or detailed work, I either have to be slow and careful so I can double check myself for careless errors, or I have to go fast and sloppy to match whatever “speed quota” the big boss sets. Neither one makes bosses happy and I get fired from those kinds of jobs pretty quick except that time I spent 3 years in a slower-paced pharmacy, but even then I was bored.

Anything that involves abstract reasoning and/or creativity, though, and I do really well by the standards of people evaluating my work (even if I feel like I did crappy work).

I’ve thought I could maybe be happier and make more money if I taught at a university instead of high school. With so many subjects to choose from, though, its hard to pick which one I’d go with. I got a bachelor’s degree with a really long name: Bachelor's of General Studies with a Concentration in Humanities with a Minor in History. I was really more interested in science, but my mother really wanted me to be a social worker and to go on to get an MSW, but I decided my junior year I didn’t want to do that and after changing majors 7 or 8 times, I just picked something I had enough credits to graduate in, which was the Bachelor's of General Studies with a Concentration in Humanities with a Minor in History. I’ve gotten a few official transcripts from the school to try to discern what my Master‘s should be. I’d really like to study human longevity and make products that relate to biology I can sell to people at a profit.

My most recent idea was to do something biotech or law or business related. A joint MS/MBA in Biotechnology might give me the skills and credibility to do something entrepreneurial in the sciences. My hobbies are pretty soft and humanities-based, so I’d like something intellectually challenging to balance that out.

Of course, the cautious side of me says I should stick with teaching until I’ve saved 4 years of living expenses and have at least 50% of my pension from my 2.5% defined benefit pension plan—that way when I try something risky like this and fail, I’ll hit a “trampoline” instead of a “sidewalk”.
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