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Old 07-19-2019, 04:48 PM
 
9,953 posts, read 8,210,101 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Same here. I was also on auto-pilot on 9/11. When we were hit, my friend was knocked to the ground and yelling "we're going to DIE" and I was losing my balance but didn't fall. I thought we were going over sideways, and the building was shuddering back and forth, but I immediately went into this calm take-charge mode. 'Hm, she could be right--we might be about to die, but we should try to make a run for it".

I was there in 1993 for the bombing, and we'd waited a while to get into the stairs and they were very crowded and smoky, so I grabbed her hand and hauled her up and said, "We have to get in the stairs right now and start running."

It took a couple of weeks before I began to feel.

But like you, we didn't scream and carry on when we were kids, so I didn't grow up thinking that was OK.

I have the least amount of tolerance for women who scream and jump on chairs or tables when they see a bug or a mouse. Get down and let me slap you, lol.

I don't mind snakes, but getting robbed at gunpoint? Now THAT sounds scary.
I spent 8 years in the Navy and had extensive fire fighting training as well as actual ship board fires. Ive seen some who scream at the sight of their first actual fire, some who freeze in place, some who run around mindlessly, and some who take decisive action. Most of the previous three will eventually recover through direction given and the next time there was a fire they responded properly. When a pot caught fire on the stove my wife screamed, I responded. After that day she never again argued with me on my placing the fire extinguisher near the entrance to the kitchen on the wall.
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Old 07-19-2019, 04:49 PM
 
9,953 posts, read 8,210,101 times
Reputation: 13510
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dwatted Wabbit View Post
They watch too many game shows where the peanut gallery is encouraged to scream, go hysterical, and otherwise act like they have no mind. Often they don't.

Change the channel.
I have Aspergers, Id never get called to get on stage at a game show nor would I respond to their coaching.
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Old 07-20-2019, 05:18 AM
 
10,626 posts, read 12,770,787 times
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I've wondered the same thing about rock concerts and amusement park thrill rides. I think it's a part of the enthusiasm of the event and must be like a kind of therapy.
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Old 07-20-2019, 10:30 AM
 
Location: The sleepy part of New York City
1,976 posts, read 1,217,236 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Same here. I was also on auto-pilot on 9/11. When we were hit, my friend was knocked to the ground and yelling "we're going to DIE" and I was losing my balance but didn't fall. I thought we were going over sideways, and the building was shuddering back and forth, but I immediately went into this calm take-charge mode. 'Hm, she could be right--we might be about to die, but we should try to make a run for it".

I was there in 1993 for the bombing, and we'd waited a while to get into the stairs and they were very crowded and smoky, so I grabbed her hand and hauled her up and said, "We have to get in the stairs right now and start running."

It took a couple of weeks before I began to feel.

But like you, we didn't scream and carry on when we were kids, so I didn't grow up thinking that was OK.
[I]I think in my case it's more than it not being ok. I honestly don't think I have the ability...if that makes sense.. to scream. It's just not a natural response for me. When I was younger I remember trying to practice screaming because I was going to see the Beatles...Lol... and I was a total failure at it.
[/i]


I have the least amount of tolerance for women who scream and jump on chairs or tables when they see a bug or a mouse. Get down and let me slap you, lol.

[I]me too! Lol[/i]


I don't mind snakes, but getting robbed at gunpoint? Now THAT sounds scary
.
It's amazing how fast the mind works when you're in danger. Every scenario runs through your mind in a matter of milliseconds, and you just hope you make the right choice. I guess I did because I didn't get shot.
Outwardly, I was calm, cool, and acted nonchalant about it. I got robbed at work on payday and the place i worked paid the workers in cash. I just handed all the money over to him and then silently prayed that he didn't shoot me in the back or rape me as he led me to the store bathroom. He didn't thank goodness and when I finally got up the nerve to come out.. he was gone, along with the cash and my purse.

After he took my purse, I was scared because now not only did that guy know where I lived, but he also had my house keys and it was too late at night to change the locks. Thankfully, I had dogs that would bark loudly at noise so I wasn't too afraid. But then I started getting phone calls late at night at home telling me 'what beautiful blue eyes I had'.. and other more suggestive calls. I know it was him. It was only then that I was truly scared. I didn't sleep very well for a long time after that just waiting and hoping the phone wouldn't ring. But they eventually stopped and with time, the trauma fades into the background and life goes on.
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Old 07-20-2019, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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Same reason people whoop and holler at athletic events. They get emotionally engaged.
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Old 07-20-2019, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Middle America
36,715 posts, read 42,012,116 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I never understood people who scream, either. It seems contrived to me and an attempt at getting attention.

My daughter graduated with her Master's this spring. At the graduation ceremony, some families felt the need to scream obnoxiously when they heard their graduate's name announced. Is that sort of trashy behavior really necessary?
My dad has been bitching about this for years. He's sat on boards of education for decades, and been through countless commencement ceremonies, and it's a huge pet peeve.

When I got my master's, I had to prep him that our university not only wasn't discouraging cheering sections, they actively encouraged them.
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Old Today, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,266 posts, read 54,712,832 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elliedeee View Post
It's amazing how fast the mind works when you're in danger. Every scenario runs through your mind in a matter of milliseconds, and you just hope you make the right choice. I guess I did because I didn't get shot.
Outwardly, I was calm, cool, and acted nonchalant about it. I got robbed at work on payday and the place i worked paid the workers in cash. I just handed all the money over to him and then silently prayed that he didn't shoot me in the back or rape me as he led me to the store bathroom. He didn't thank goodness and when I finally got up the nerve to come out.. he was gone, along with the cash and my purse.

After he took my purse, I was scared because now not only did that guy know where I lived, but he also had my house keys and it was too late at night to change the locks. Thankfully, I had dogs that would bark loudly at noise so I wasn't too afraid. But then I started getting phone calls late at night at home telling me 'what beautiful blue eyes I had'.. and other more suggestive calls. I know it was him. It was only then that I was truly scared. I didn't sleep very well for a long time after that just waiting and hoping the phone wouldn't ring. But they eventually stopped and with time, the trauma fades into the background and life goes on.
Wow, that is a scary story. I'm glad you were safe.

I laughed at the remarks in blue you put into my post--I could not scream if I tried, either. I just don't have a high-pitched voice.
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Old Today, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,266 posts, read 54,712,832 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
Same reason people whoop and holler at athletic events. They get emotionally engaged.
That's true, and for some reason it doesn't bother me about a sporting event. But it reminded me, since I have 9/11 on the brain (just saw Come From Away on Broadway on Saturday, too) that I couldn't stand listening to the screaming on TV at sporting events for a while after the attacks. It sounded too much like the screaming out on the street when the buildings went down.

My aversion to people screaming in general, though, predated that. It may just be a general prejudice against people who overact emotionally. I think I see it as a bid to try to draw attention to themselves.
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Old Today, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,266 posts, read 54,712,832 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
My dad has been bitching about this for years. He's sat on boards of education for decades, and been through countless commencement ceremonies, and it's a huge pet peeve.

When I got my master's, I had to prep him that our university not only wasn't discouraging cheering sections, they actively encouraged them.
It is also unfair to the next graduate whose name cannot be heard because the Smiths are still screeching so loudly over their precious little Buffy, who's already left the stage.
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