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Old Yesterday, 10:01 PM
 
Location: USA
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about 2yrs. ago, in my area, there was a young boy about 12 who murdered a younger boy at a playground park. From what I gathered reading the articles about the case, the murderer grew up in an abusive home. I do have to wonder about those type of kids growing up in a violent environment, if thy're more likely to act out violently towards others.
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Old Yesterday, 11:41 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
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Originally Posted by celticseas View Post
This is something that some people say but I wonder why? If a kid gets bullied in school and online then reaches breaking point and stabs his bully, he'll be called spoiled. I was also called this when I was talking to a therapist and young expressing similar sentiments (though never went through with any of it) towards my bullies.

My question is why is killing someone considered spoiled? It's definitely a grave offense if not one of the most grave offenses one can commit but people definitely make a distinction if it's a middle aged person doing it vs a young person. Ted Bundy for example is considered crazy, immoral, insane and has an auora of fascination among some people whereas someone like Elliot Rodger is considered entitled, bratty, selfish etc.. They both killed people yet the latter received more 'condemnation'. Why is that?

If a young person were to rape or molest a child, they also would be looked as depraved but not spoiled in the same way. Why is this?
You got a source? I've never heard this.
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Old Today, 04:37 AM
 
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Originally Posted by celticseas View Post
What about Elliot Rodger? Many call him entitled for feeling he was owed sex and wanted to kill others to get it.

I see where that would come from. He lived a privileged lifestyle in Isla Vista.

Maybe its just me sharing my thoughts with a former therapist.
That’s a pretty out of the norm case, and apparently was a rich kid, lots of very wealthy kids are spoiled. I’m sure they had a lifetime history about this kid to base calling him spoiled on, not just the murder in isolation.
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Old Today, 04:38 AM
 
20,727 posts, read 16,731,423 times
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Originally Posted by HappyFarm34 View Post
about 2yrs. ago, in my area, there was a young boy about 12 who murdered a younger boy at a playground park. From what I gathered reading the articles about the case, the murderer grew up in an abusive home. I do have to wonder about those type of kids growing up in a violent environment, if thy're more likely to act out violently towards others.
Yes there is lots of proof for generational cycles of violence.
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Old Today, 12:10 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
I agree with you in the social sense although I would still use the concept of damage. In the psychiatric sense understanding the etiology and the appropriate treatment is important and neither pity nor revenge has a place in resolution.

Personal responsibility, however, is crucial. Finding the "sweet spot" where all facets of the extended treatment team agree on method is a problem.

I have seen this effect up front and close where people fail to maintain emotional neutrality and it rarely has good results. People have to have faith in the chosen course of treatment and adhere to it. There's little hope of that as a child moves from a therapeutic to a legal to a home environment.
Fair enough, I concede to your reasoning.
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