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Old 07-27-2019, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Germany
193 posts, read 34,017 times
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I don't understand the need to complain about this. Why is it cringeworthy?
There's no reason. That's just how they like to speak. why are you annoyed?
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Old 07-27-2019, 01:34 PM
 
833 posts, read 201,320 times
Reputation: 603
habit and convenience, as well as wishful thinking.
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Old 07-27-2019, 01:38 PM
 
357 posts, read 63,371 times
Reputation: 734

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3Zad39QXL4
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Old 07-27-2019, 01:39 PM
 
357 posts, read 63,371 times
Reputation: 734

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vuEQixrBKCc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GT3vhcy3XaQ
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Old 07-27-2019, 03:11 PM
 
357 posts, read 63,371 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gohangr View Post
Why is it cringeworthy?
what first world problem did you have today?
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Old 07-27-2019, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Middle America
36,786 posts, read 42,092,427 times
Reputation: 50751
Quote:
Originally Posted by Surfer Guy View Post
I cringe whenever I hear someone say one of the following phrases:

1. But I digress.
2. Who knew?
3. Don't get me wrong.

The above are usually part of a sentence when describing something, but they are unnecessary. Why do people use the above phrases?
They actually all have specific purposes, and each is one of the more succinct ways to communicate that purpose. I suppose you COULD say, "I recognize that what I'm about to say could be easily misinterpreted, so I'd like to acknowledge ahead of time that it would be easy to interpret it in a particular way, and this is my disclaimer to preemptively allay potential misunderstanding," but isn't "Don't get me wrong" significantly less unwieldy?

They might happen to annoy you, but each of them does actually serve a descriptive or illustrative purpose.

Prior to clicking on the thread, I imagined it might be about filler words and vocal pauses, like "Um," which actually do serve linguistic purposes, but don't necessarily serve any purpose specifically in conveying meaning or tone.

The only phrasing that consistently gets on my nerves is that of corporatespeak cliches. Every industry has its specific vocabulary and jargon, lexicon that's unique to a given setting or context. That's understandable. It provides useful shortcuts, and functions as a type of code that helps differentiate ingroups from outgroups. Business jargon however, has a few facets that set it apart from other industries' specialized vocabulary. For one thing, it is absolutely RIFE with euphemisms. No, you're not "restructuring," or "downsizing," you're firing people. Or, pardon me, "letting them go" (because firing people is exactly like letting caged birds free, it's really a humanitarian approach, you know!).

It also tends to take existing, meaningful terms, and use them in inexact, buzzword-y ways that don't really use the true meaning. This causes the term to be watered down to the point of being inexact and meaningless. "Synergy," which enjoyed a heyday among corporate raiders, is a good one. Its origins are in theology, and it has fairly mystical meaning...initially, an interplay of the human will and divine grace. Not really the same thing when you're using it to talk about the results of your investment banking firm buying out another investment banking firm. It got to the point where it is just a more inflated way of saying "cooperation," which is pretty generic and far from the origins of the word. And, of course, a lot of corporate jargon takes really initially very good, illustrative metaphors ("low-hanging fruit," for instance) and just beats them to death.

But, clearly, I have digressed.
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Old 07-27-2019, 04:10 PM
 
357 posts, read 63,371 times
Reputation: 734
Quote:
Originally Posted by Surfer Guy View Post
I cringe whenever I hear someone say ....

This one is the killer: "She gave the weed to Bill and I."
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Old 07-27-2019, 04:14 PM
 
6,370 posts, read 3,612,248 times
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It's worse when people say ". . .to me and Bill." In keeping with our increasingly self-centered society today most everyone puts themselves first.

But that's bad grammar, not exactly the same thing as irritating speech habits.
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Old 07-27-2019, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Middle America
36,786 posts, read 42,092,427 times
Reputation: 50751
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCal_Native View Post
This one is the killer: "She gave the weed to Bill and I."
Well, yeah. Because it's incorrect.
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Old 07-27-2019, 05:54 PM
 
6,735 posts, read 3,791,154 times
Reputation: 13887
Quote:
Originally Posted by Surfer Guy View Post
I cringe whenever I hear someone say one of the following phrases:

1. But I digress.
2. Who knew?
3. Don't get me wrong.

The above are usually part of a sentence when describing something, but they are unnecessary. Why do people use the above phrases?
I say the first two frequently. The first I say tongue in cheek. Because it's something that's said by hoity toity people. People who know me know that I'm doing a tongue in cheek thing.

I say "Who knew?" as a shorthand way of saying, "Who would have expected THAT?" or "I sure didn't see that coming!" There's nothing wrong with that phrase, IMO.

I cringe when I hear: I could have cared less.
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