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Old Today, 09:32 AM
 
6,741 posts, read 2,435,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Surfer Guy View Post
I cringe whenever I hear someone say one of the following phrases:

1. But I digress.
2. Who knew?
3. Don't get me wrong.

The above are usually part of a sentence when describing something, but they are unnecessary. Why do people use the above phrases?

1. Someone digressed
2. Apparently the person speaking didn't know
3. The person speaking wants to make it clear where they're coming from.


Are there other ways to say what he/she meant to say? Sure.


1. "but I've diverged from the original point I was trying to make..."
2. "Wow! Learn something new everyday!"
3. "There are multiple ways someone could take what I just said in a negative manner. I wish to be clearly understood, so listen closely."


Would those be better?
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Old Today, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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I actually find culturally specific phrasing to be super interesting. We've got family members in (British) English-speaking countries, and it's fun to pick up on what their versions of different turns of phrase are.

My London-dwelling Scottish brother-in-law, though he works in a highly corporate world and travels internationally to do so, isn't prone to using the types of jargon that are a given in the world of American business culture. But he's got his own turns of phrase that are typical to those working in his same context in Europe, Australia, etc.
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Old Today, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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One point on the "Who knew?" phrase...while t's clearly used often to sincerely to illustrate information that was unexpected or surprising to the listener, lately I've heard it just as often used in a tongue-in-cheek manner to highlight the obvious. "Kim Kardashian and Kanye West have had another child they've given a nonstandard name...who knew?" or "Donald Trump was up tweeting at 4 a.m. about how he's never even heard of Russia...who knew?"

More of an ironic slant to the phrase seems to have gained traction.
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Old Today, 12:18 PM
 
Location: southern california
55,782 posts, read 74,782,583 times
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No problem
You guys
You two
Awesome
You all
Actually
Virtually
I was literally blah blah blah
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Old Today, 01:02 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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I don't like "literally" when it's improperly used.

"My head literally just exploded." Um, no...it really didn't. But that would have been a sight.

Otherwise, I have no problem with it.
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Old Today, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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As far as "you guys," it's common colloquially where I'm from (although the old guard would still say "youse guys," but that's been watered down in the past couple of generations. My grandpa always said it, though).

I had to train myself out of it when I was in teacher training about 20 years ago. I would always collectively address my classes of middle schoolers and high schoolers as "You guys," when directing attention, and got repeatedly dinged for it in observation evaluations. I don't know that any of my students took offense at being collectively referred to as guys, but it was generally frowned upon by those doing the evaluating. But I gradually modified it to "Okay, folks," or just "Alright, everybody," when I would have typically used "You guys." It took some time, though.

Eventually, my last teaching post was in a classroom that actually WAS all male, where it would have been reasonable to say "You guys." But, by then, the habit had been replaced.
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Old Today, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Ft. Myers
17,723 posts, read 11,261,926 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Itzpapalotl View Post
Because they are linguistic tools that allow an individual to express their particular points or motivations. And people use tools that are most convenient to them.

Yep. And if we were to critique every little utterance that comes out of people's mouths, it would drive us crazy. People simply express themselves in their own way.
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Old Today, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Middle America
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I always feel that way about "It is what it is."

I get that it's irritatingly overused, and, on the surface, appears to be nonsensical/stating the obvious. But it does have a usefulness.

Working with counseling clients who have a hard time accepting and productively dealing with things in their lives that they aren't able to change, it comes up. In in that context, the sentiment is really just about acceptance of things when there is no other healthy way to proceed. The same sentiment, essentially, in theologian Reinhold Neibuhr's words on serenity, "the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can and wisdom to know the difference," popular in AA circles.

To me, "it is what it is" is useful in this context.
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Old Today, 01:48 PM
 
1,053 posts, read 361,438 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
As far as "you guys," it's common colloquially where I'm from (although the old guard would still say "youse guys," but that's been watered down in the past couple of generations. My grandpa always said it, though).
Are you from Philly?
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Old Today, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Middle America
36,815 posts, read 42,104,607 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnnaGWS View Post
Are you from Philly?
Nope, but it's essentially the same swath of regional dialect.

Chicago area, broadly. An ex was a native Buffalonian, and it was a common thing there, too.

A quick, interesting Trib op ed on it...

https://www.chicagotribune.com/opini...206-story.html

Interesting note about the Gaelic/Irish origins of it, and it's notable that there are definitely places in Irealnd where it's still the norm.
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