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Old 07-26-2019, 06:00 PM
 
80 posts, read 21,507 times
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I cringe whenever I hear someone say one of the following phrases:

1. But I digress.
2. Who knew?
3. Don't get me wrong.

The above are usually part of a sentence when describing something, but they are unnecessary. Why do people use the above phrases?
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Old 07-26-2019, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,156 posts, read 23,103,865 times
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I like them. They just sound American to me.
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Old 07-26-2019, 07:53 PM
 
297 posts, read 54,571 times
Reputation: 625
Neither here nor there.
It is what it is.
At the end of the day.
"like" after ever three words in a spoken sentence
Ya know?
I'm all...
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Old 07-26-2019, 07:54 PM
 
297 posts, read 54,571 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Surfer Guy View Post
Why do people use the above phrases?
They watch too much TV.
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Old Yesterday, 06:36 AM
 
463 posts, read 89,455 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Surfer Guy View Post
Why do people use the above phrases?
Because they are linguistic tools that allow an individual to express their particular points or motivations. And people use tools that are most convenient to them.
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Old Yesterday, 08:47 AM
 
5,857 posts, read 3,289,266 times
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Our brains don't work as fast as our mouths do. At least mine doesn't, ya know? At the end of the day, I just need a few extra seconds, like, to gather my thoughts and then I'm all... okay. Don't get me wrong. I like spicy meatballs but I can't, like, have them every day. But I digress. We were talking about your grandma being in the hospital.

Just kidding around. But I understand what you're saying. I do my best not to use filler words when I'm speaking with another person, and especially if I'm speaking to a group of people. Nothing makes peoples' eyes glaze over faster than listening to a bunch of , "like, ya know, anyway..."
However, I am guilty of using the word, "actually" way too often and am trying to break myself of this annoying habit. It doesn't actually mean much and I should actually stop peppering my speech with it. Mmmm. Pepper. Meatballs. What were we talking about, again?
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Old Yesterday, 09:31 AM
 
Location: equator
3,532 posts, read 1,565,698 times
Reputation: 8785
Your examples, though, have some meaning. What would you substitute to convey the same meaning?

"I digress" lets the listener know you are aware of getting off-topic (to use a C-D expression). And hopefully are now getting back "on".

I have stuff that annoys me too, though. DH says 100 times a day: "The bottom line is...."
I've tried to think of better ways to express that, but nothing is exactly the same.

What I hate is the trend of making nouns into verbs. Especially this latest one: "The Ask".
What happened to "request" or "demand"? Have to dumb it down to the verb "Ask"?

Corporate-speak the most annoying of all. I think they started the noun-to-verb.

Also, an ex-boss used to say "The Sweet Spot" and I would just cringe.
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Old Yesterday, 09:32 AM
 
Location: equator
3,532 posts, read 1,565,698 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCal_Native View Post
Neither here nor there.
It is what it is.
At the end of the day.
"like" after ever three words in a spoken sentence
Ya know?
I'm all...
I loathe all of these. More corporate-speak (the first two).
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Old Yesterday, 09:36 AM
 
297 posts, read 54,571 times
Reputation: 625
CD Forum Thread:

Words or phrases you hate
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Old Yesterday, 09:53 AM
 
6,367 posts, read 3,609,999 times
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Starting a conversation with "I mean. . ." Isn't it assumed that what comes out of your mouth is what you mean to say?

I have a SIL that ends a lot of sentences with "and that."

Mom still talked about a high school teacher she had who said "In that respect" too frequently.

Verbal tics. To me they seem to be used to indicate a more credible level of speech that the speaker doesn't, for some reason, presently have the ability to communicate.
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