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Old 08-08-2019, 04:53 PM
 
3,680 posts, read 938,048 times
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This is a shot in the dark. But I've always been suspect that Common Core math "was designed for people to complete mathematical equations without having to hold numbers in their head".

Would this be any easier for you than traditional math?

Operations & Algebraic Thinking | Common Core State Standards Initiative
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Old 08-08-2019, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
22,244 posts, read 14,612,761 times
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I have trouble with math too. But you have a calculator on your phone, no?

If you have trouble knowing how to figure percentages, get someone to help you memorize the equation you need to figure them so you know how to enter this into the calculator.

I only learned shortcuts to estimating values as a mature adult. I used to have to add lists of figures using a calculator, and I always had to add everything up several times.

For me, numbers are slippery and hard to remember for even a few seconds, but other stuff sticks. So, I don’t think your situation is hopeless. You just need to learn how to use a calculator.
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Old 08-08-2019, 05:39 PM
 
3,680 posts, read 938,048 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
I have trouble with math too. But you have a calculator on your phone, no?

If you have trouble knowing how to figure percentages, get someone to help you memorize the equation you need to figure them so you know how to enter this into the calculator.

I only learned shortcuts to estimating values as a mature adult. I used to have to add lists of figures using a calculator, and I always had to add everything up several times.

For me, numbers are slippery and hard to remember for even a few seconds, but other stuff sticks. So, I donít think your situation is hopeless. You just need to learn how to use a calculator.
Yes, per a teacher in my high school Algebra 2 class, around 2005: "I could teach you how to do logarithms without a calculator, but it would just take too long".

An answer from an authority in mathematics that calculators are assumed to be present, so we can safely rely on them. I don't like rough estimates or rules of thumb, I just use my calc and am done with it.

I have been an engineer, but could not remember (and did not pursue the re-education) how to do long division. It just doesn't matter how you come about your answer after you leave school.
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Old 08-08-2019, 05:45 PM
 
9,515 posts, read 9,339,892 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adriank7 View Post
I consider myself a smart person. I pick up on things and can learn jobs fast but whenever I have to figure out anything mathematical with pricing (which is rare since it usually auto populates or I just add a percentage) I get confused and need to have my boss or a coworker walk me through it. In HS I was behind in math and never got passed algebra. Never took physics or calculus. Always had a tutor. I remember only one teacher that was able to explain algebra a certain way that I got it. Now I even have trouble with simple math. I couldnít even remember old school division. Why is it so hard for me to grasp. I feel like I have to read things 10 times if I have a convoluted price issue at work and I still donít get it. Luckily my job rarely entails this but when it does come up. I feel stupid.
Well, if you get a good calculator, you're okay.

On the other hand, you don't mention your age, but you still might consider taking a quickie remedial math class, just to boost your confidence. Or just a couple sessions with a tutor. You could probably find some college kid who would be happy to spend a couple of evenings with you.
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Old 08-08-2019, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Washington state
5,509 posts, read 2,809,783 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCal_Native View Post
You'd be surprised how many engineers and mathematicians think 48ų2(9+3) = 2. (It doesn't.)
48ų2(9+3) = 48/ 2(9 + 3) = 48/ 2 x 12 = 48/24 = 2

Even if you did the parentheses first, you'd still get 2(9) + 2(3) (distribution), which is 24. Then you'd have 48 ų 24.

It depends on which system you were taught. I was always taught to replace the symbols with their equivalents. In this case, I'd replace the divided sign by / (or rather a straight line) and then 48 would go on top and 2(9+3) would go underneath. After that, you work the parentheses and then the math. Engineers have been doing it this way for centuries. If buildings start collapsing in the next couple of years, you know why.


OP, are you sure you're just not a visual learner? Math is very linear and it can be difficult for a visual learner. Also, I sometimes think they teach a lot of advanced math too soon. Some people's brains just don't wrap themselves around math of any kind until the person is in their mid 20s to 30s.
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Old 08-08-2019, 07:11 PM
Status: "No leaf clover." (set 24 days ago)
 
1,090 posts, read 659,935 times
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Give us an example of what calculations you struggle with: CDer's are highly intelligent and helpful folks.
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Old 08-08-2019, 07:12 PM
 
429 posts, read 330,082 times
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try the chinese way of counting instead of the american
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Old 08-08-2019, 07:27 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,716 posts, read 55,076,187 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sassybluesy View Post
When I was a kid in grade school, I missed a lot of school in 4th and 5th grade because I was sick a lot with asthma. I missed a lot of math, and from that point on, I was bad at math.


When I went to community college, I had to take a remedial math class. I am so glad I did. The teacher basically started from 1st grade stuff, through algebra. Understanding that everything builds on the previous steps, she (the teacher) helped to like...lay down the basic building blocks, and keep building on what I previously learned, and how it's all related. It helped me so much!


OP, if you wanted, maybe that's what you could do. See if you can take a remedial math class at your local CC.
I didn't pass the remedial math class at a private university. It is part of what discouraged me from completing my degree. A basic algebra class was required for matriculation, and I couldn't do ninth-grade algebra.

I would walk out of the remedial class thinking "I've got it", and by the time I went home and tried to do homework, it was gone. It was like looking at hieroglyphics.
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Old 08-08-2019, 07:30 PM
 
1,137 posts, read 257,294 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
48ų2(9+3) = 48/ 2(9 + 3) = 48/ 2 x 12 = 48/24 = 2

Even if you did the parentheses first, you'd still get 2(9) + 2(3) (distribution), which is 24. Then you'd have 48 ų 24.

It depends on which system you were taught. I was always taught to replace the symbols with their equivalents. In this case, I'd replace the divided sign by / (or rather a straight line) and then 48 would go on top and 2(9+3) would go underneath. After that, you work the parentheses and then the math. Engineers have been doing it this way for centuries. If buildings start collapsing in the next couple of years, you know why.
The correct order of operations is PEMDAS. First process the parens. Then when the equation is purely multiplication and division, process FROM LEFT TO RIGHT.
=48/2*12 = 24*12 = 288.
288 is always correct.
2 is always incorrect.

Google, Matlab, HP Calculators, and Excel all return 288.

Here's one of my favorites though:

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Old 08-08-2019, 11:43 PM
 
Location: Retired in Malibu/La Quinta/Flagstaff
1,352 posts, read 1,343,776 times
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Good at math? No way. I always say, "Barefoot and zipper down, I can't count past 21."
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