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Old Yesterday, 09:32 AM
 
6,931 posts, read 3,790,270 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CA4Now View Post
But if you did the parenthesis first, you'd be adding 9 + 3, so you'd no longer be calculating 2(9) or 2(3).

When our state had the CAHSEE (California High School Exit Exam), this type of problem would be an example of a "tricky" question for students who forgot about PEMDAS. One of the answers would be 2, which of course was wrong; the correct answer being 288.
There is another issue with this problem PEMDAS leads you astray. The term 2(9+3) is of the form aX which is mathematically a single term and has to be done first. The form aX implies (2(9+3)) with the second set parent parens implied. Juxtapositional multiplication.
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Old Yesterday, 10:01 AM
 
706 posts, read 123,273 times
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Originally Posted by CA4Now View Post
A thread from the education forum: Dyscalculia - the silent illiteracy
This keeps one out of low wage jobs such as cashiering and other counter work, as well makes it tough getting around in everyday life.
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Old Today, 08:05 AM
 
Location: So Ca
15,950 posts, read 15,171,683 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CA4Now View Post
But if you did the parenthesis first, you'd be adding 9 + 3, so you'd no longer be calculating 2(9) or 2(3).

When our state had the CAHSEE (California High School Exit Exam), this type of problem would be an example of a "tricky" question for students who forgot about PEMDAS. One of the answers would be 2, which of course was wrong; the correct answer being 288.
Re: 48ų2(9+3) =

Wow, I must have posted too early in the a.m. I meant to write "One of the answers would be 288, which of course was wrong; the correct answer being 2."

Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
There is another issue with this problem PEMDAS leads you astray. The term 2(9+3) is of the form aX which is mathematically a single term and has to be done first. The form aX implies (2(9+30....
Good point, although either way (with the distributive property or not), the answer is 2, since 2(9)=18 + 2(3) = 6; 18 + 6 = 24; 48/24 = 2.
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Old Today, 08:12 AM
 
Location: SoCal again
16,169 posts, read 12,987,781 times
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Originally Posted by Adriank7 View Post
I consider myself a smart person. I feel stupid.
You can't be smart at everything. Don't feel stupid. If you want to change it, do simple math exercises on the net. But it seems like you don't "need" it in life, so why bother?

I was very quick at simple math because I was a waitress back in the day during college and had to add up alot of beer . I lost most of it but you can always make a game out of it and calculate random stuff and then check your calculator on the phone to see if you are correct. Keep doing it and it will stick.
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Old Today, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Kirkland, WA (Metro Seattle)
4,085 posts, read 3,312,345 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oh-eve View Post
You can't be smart at everything. Don't feel stupid. If you want to change it, do simple math exercises on the net. But it seems like you don't "need" it in life, so why bother?

I was very quick at simple math because I was a waitress back in the day during college and had to add up alot of beer . I lost most of it but you can always make a game out of it and calculate random stuff and then check your calculator on the phone to see if you are correct. Keep doing it and it will stick.
K, I'm not an educator. Let's get that up front.

I've known a few math nerds in my day, most of us have. Not humble bragging, hopefully, to mention per 'standardized testing' I scored well in reading comprehension, ability to express in the written word, and similar. Less well in math (or 'maths' for non-US). Well-enough, though, through college calc (with lots of homework!).

My whole life, it's been just a litttttle harder to zip through math vs. through, say, "Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire," the seminal c. 1775 work by Edward Gibbon, whose fundamental theses were simple enough to understand and abstract into modern politics. But as my dad discovered: learning my multiplication tables, 1x1 to 20x20? He gridded it out for me, as a lad, a dad's love for his son (ah, makes me a little wistful) and made me drill, drill, drill. Drilled I did. I've powered through all sorts of math courses. I'll never be a natural. I'm used to success and hate to fail; tough luck in this case...point of my post.

First years of my career, I was surrounded by fellow STEM majors. That someone might have difficulty with math did not occur to me, engineers and scientists use it all day long and basic algebra, ability to convert units in multiple ways, accurate measurements, etc. were mandatory day-in/day-out. None were complicated. Engineers using Young's Modulus and other calcs around pressure, flow, materials, etc. were near to me, too. I'd participate in various calcs when-needed, again nothing going beyond algebra and geometry. That someone might not know a tangent or Pythagorean Theorem from Hogan's Heroes did not so much as occur to me.

The software world is different, I came up in test and code where again, basic math is needed. Test in particular requires knowledge of somewhat-sophisticated statistical sampling methodologies, all math-based of course. Nothing all that alarming, though.

Business school requires what I'd call undergrad stats and algebra, ditto finance. Not that heinous, though you need to understand it well and what it MEANS, obviously.

First time I ran into a math-challenged person was a senior manager who talked to talk but was flummoxed by the basics. She was personable and talked her way into positions where others could do this, collecting loyal staff. As Director of Analytics at the time, I paused...then said (to myself): "Not a problem, we'll just cover for her because she exceptionally good in these other areas!' She did alright, other than when it came to some somewhat-advanced finance. I couldn't help her there, that was a fellow Director in 1:1s with the GM and he had no time for those who couldn't function.

I don't mind people who can't do this, thinking about my own limits. That's what we have smart underlings for, or caring spouses and family. I think those with a real disorder suffer plenty, they don't need more hot coals from me. And finally, I made a friend in the early 2000s who couldn't add 2/5 and 1/2 if it meant the firing squad. She was a waitress and winged it via the keyboard, but couldn't calc tips or even do somewhat abstract subtraction. I think a lot are and were like her. I ignored it, though she tearfully revealed all this like I didn't get it or something. Not to worry: she' was gregarious, attractive, not "dumb" but just had what seemed like an anxiety thing about math. Here's where the clinician part comes in: lack of ability gave her anxiety, or the inverse?

I think careers find people. We rise to our own level of incompetence, I may be at mine for example and I'm okay with that. I'm hitting above my weight, comparing IQ to income percentile, which is probably due to personality and shrewdness for a good bet career-wise.

Such folk are limited in what they can do in life, and here I'd lean on a coach or clinician if any tutoring actually helps. After watching my ex-GF and her ex-husband spend thousands, then tens of thousands, on "tutors" for their kid whom was about eleven by that time, I'm doubtful. I read the kid's report cards and reports from educators: he was what we'd have called "a little slow" back in the day, but with a really positive attitude. My ex-GF was continually saddened since she knew he'd have a tough row in the modern economy that values IQ and quickness for the top jobs. I reminded her that a thoughtfully-chosen trade, as many here mention, is honorable and hard work that pays a living wage. Lots of demands for certain fields too. Hope it worked out for the kid, that was seven years ago and he's probably deciding about now where to go. Not to Harvard, but hopefully not Ft. Leavenworth busting rocks either.
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Old Today, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Mountains of Oregon
15,367 posts, read 17,874,722 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oh-eve View Post
You can't be smart at everything. Don't feel stupid. If you want to change it, do simple math exercises on the net. But it seems like you don't "need" it in life, so why bother?

I was very quick at simple math because I was a waitress back in the day during college and had to add up alot of beer . I lost most of it but you can always make a game out of it and calculate random stuff and then check your calculator on the phone to see if you are correct. Keep doing it and it will stick.

They fill many bier mugs at The Hofbrauhaus, in Munich. We had some great times there. (prost)

http://www.hofbraeuhaus.de/en/welcome.html

I took a calculator math class in college. It was interesting.
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