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Old 11-01-2023, 03:48 PM
 
Location: Tippecanoe County, Indiana
26,372 posts, read 46,204,927 times
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Case in point, HGTV Christina Hall, Uptalk in this commercial spot:
From Anaheim, CA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EhPdfHS3BK0
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Old 11-01-2023, 04:30 PM
 
1,504 posts, read 1,005,725 times
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Haven't heard it in a while but people interjecting "and stuff" such as "I went to the mall and stuff". Once, while sitting with a group at work, I said that I was tired of hearing this. One woman said she'd never heard that. She said it all the time! Totally oblivious to what came out of her mouth.
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Old 11-01-2023, 06:39 PM
 
Location: equator
10,999 posts, read 6,525,543 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikala43 View Post
I can always pick out a 70s movie by the way the women speak. It's breathy, soft voice, even if the situation does not call for that. It grates on my nerves.

Same with 50s movies, and 30s.

It's funny to watch them because the people speak so differently, and it's not just the words used, it's HOW they talk.
So true! I used to refer to this as "Old timey accent" but then found out it was a "learned" speech practice called Mid-Atlantic that actors and radio announcers were taught back then. Cary Grant is listed as the prime example of this, though he combined his English roots into it.

I never thought about the "breathy" speech of the women in the 70s, but you are right. I mean Marilyn Monroe had that nailed.

Back to the OP, the "uptalk" is really annoying and does sound insecure. And uneducated.
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Old 11-01-2023, 07:26 PM
 
21,408 posts, read 12,558,787 times
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I believe the term is "upspeak." It's been the topic of other threads. And, yes, it's very annoying.
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Old 11-01-2023, 07:53 PM
bu2
 
23,845 posts, read 14,623,704 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonic_Spork View Post
I agree.

I also think that most people, if they spend any significant amount of time around others, will start to mirror whatever kind of speech they are hearing. Some do this more readily than others, and I would be really interested in knowing more about why that is. I know that a week long vacation in another part of the country, visiting people who have any kind of an accent or speech pattern, will be enough for me to start unconsciously mirroring it. And I once came away from a solid weekend of Monty Python marathon, speaking not just with some accent going on but with the particular pauses and rhythms common to a lot of their sketch comedy.

And in addition to all of the stuff with accents and patterns like that... I pick up what I refer to as "isms" from other people. Particular words, phrases, or even gestures or ways of saying something. I have gone back and watched some show or movie or something I had not seen in many years, only to recognize a thing that I say or do pretty commonly in my speech comes directly from a particular line delivered by some actor, and I'd long forgotten where it came from!

And I have been guilty of doing the Lewis Black "angry fingers and clenched teeth" thing when expressing certain thoughts where I intend a kind of humorous hyperbole. Silly-mad.

I think it's very interesting how we get all the bits and pieces that form our communication.

And maybe when it comes to something like upspeak...a lot of folks find it annoying and might avoid people who do it, and perhaps to some extent, if a person picks it up by mirroring and then does it without thinking it signals association with a social group?

But I actually JUST realized that the Australian comedian Hannah Gadsby does it a lot and I like one of her stand up specials and LOVE another one (Douglas was soooo funny)... It doesn't bug me when she does it.
I know when my wife goes home to South Georgia, her South Georgia accent gets a lot thicker. When I was in junior high I had a science class with 5 Hispanics at my table. At the end of the class I would catch myself sounding like them with my own Spanish accent! I lived so many places when I was younger my normal accent has become kind of muted.
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Old 11-01-2023, 08:52 PM
 
Location: Kentucky Bluegrass
28,839 posts, read 30,069,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Case in point, HGTV Christina Hall, Uptalk in this commercial spot:
From Anaheim, CA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EhPdfHS3BK0
Thats not really as bad as what I have been hearing, honestly.....
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Old 11-01-2023, 10:24 PM
 
1,711 posts, read 769,269 times
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I didn't hear it, but plenty of vocal creek. All three of those people look useless, to me.
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Old 11-02-2023, 09:37 AM
 
Location: Central Virginia
6,512 posts, read 8,291,816 times
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Upspeak has been a topic of conversation for many years.

https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-28708526

https://www.npr.org/2015/07/23/42560...-womens-voices

https://www.inhersight.com/blog/cult...onalism/uptalk


Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Case in point, HGTV Christina Hall, Uptalk in this commercial spot:
From Anaheim, CA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EhPdfHS3BK0
IMO, upspeak is ending a statement with a rising inflection. As if you're asking a question instead of making a statement.

I heard zero upspeak in that video.
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Old 11-02-2023, 09:46 AM
 
Location: New England
3,171 posts, read 1,656,141 times
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Rising inflection at the end of each sentence is very similar to an Irish accent.
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Old 11-02-2023, 10:47 AM
 
21,408 posts, read 12,558,787 times
Reputation: 36146
Quote:
Originally Posted by heavymind View Post
I didn't hear it, but plenty of vocal creek.
Vocal FRY?
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