U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Psychology
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-02-2009, 07:06 PM
 
1,831 posts, read 3,733,571 times
Reputation: 1222

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivorytickler View Post
I don't think people are. If they are, it's because they haven't been around them and they think IQ means something it doesn't. I grew up around them and spent my first career working alongside them. I think if you've been around them you know that the distinction fades with age as a lot of people catch up to where they are and, sometimes, pass them.

I've gone farther than both of my girlfriends, my brothers and my sister who have genius IQ's. So has another average brother. My husband has a genius IQ and all it's ever done is frustrate him. He seems to think he should be smarter than he is and things should come easier than they do. He's also frustrated that people don't stand up and take note as if what he says should matter more. He has to be handled with kid gloves. He tends to write software that's over the heads of his customer. He hates when I point that out and argues that they should have to learn it the right way. Problem is, they're the customer. All his IQ has gotten him is a lot of frustration. Sometimes, I think he'd be better off down here on earth with the rest of us.

I worry about our daughter who has a high IQ. For now, life is easy for her. She has the distinction of being the smart kid but I know in time that will fade. In college or shortly therafter, things will start to even out. Others who never held the distinction she does now will catch up to her. She won't be the stand out she once was. I hope that doesn't sour her on life like it has my husband and my best friend in high school. For them, the glory days are forever behind them because they didn't achieve the same kind of greatness in life they knew as children.

My brothers and my sister aren't bothered by this but no one ever made a big deal out of them. It was just a score on a test. No G&T program and no acceleration. Growing up in hicksville does have it's advantages. It never dawned on anyone that they should be treated differently so they grew up to be pretty well adjusted.
Interesting comments. I don't think that everyone catches up and that everything evens out. History has produced some very gifted and intelligent people who are quite obviously well above others. I think some very intelligent people get tired of the distinction and pretend that they're like everyone else. This society does not value the very highly intelligent, which was part of the reason for my questions. Also, there are those with the high IQ who don't know how to relate to others or don't know how to share what they know with others, so that others can understand them. It's like some of them don't know how to be comfortable in their skin. Maybe they have unrealistic expectations of what it's like to be highly intelligent. Are they supposed to be the know it all? Are they supposed to "use their gift" and achieve greatness? If they decide to live average lives, is that okay?Just some thoughts. There are different types of intelligence and gifts. Live and let live.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-02-2009, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,708,331 times
Reputation: 14495
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowian View Post
Interesting comments. I don't think that everyone catches up and that everything evens out. History has produced some very gifted and intelligent people who are quite obviously well above others. I think some very intelligent people get tired of the distinction and pretend that they're like everyone else. This society does not value the very highly intelligent, which was part of the reason for my questions. Also, there are those with the high IQ who don't know how to relate to others or don't know how to share what they know with others, so that others can understand them. It's like some of them don't know how to be comfortable in their skin. Maybe they have unrealistic expectations of what it's like to be highly intelligent. Are they supposed to be the know it all? Are they supposed to "use their gift" and achieve greatness? If they decide to live average lives, is that okay?Just some thoughts. There are different types of intelligence and gifts. Live and let live.
There are some who continue into adulthood but there are some who get passed by by people of lesser intelligence too. Not everything evens but it seems to happen a lot. There are far more "gifted" children than gifted adults that's for sure. At least with respect to accomplishment. Test scores, they probably come out the same since I think they use the same normal curve no matter what age group you look at. IQ just seems to matter more in kids.

My daughter could be said to be gifted, musically. Now at age 11, she's grouped with other kids who started young like her and some who started later and simply excelled. In the end, some will be better than others but which ones it will be is still up for grabs. The kids who showed talent young don't have the race sewn up and the kids who showed talent later aren't ruled out. There's way more to the game than what you were born with.

As to what they are supposed to do with their gifts, the answer is something worthy of the gift. The gift loses value if not used. The, truely, gifted, leave their mark on history. The rest blend in like the rest of us and might as well never have been born gifted in the first place. It's not your gift that matters. It's what you do with it. Someone like my BIL (who I understand scored a flat 100) who makes something of himself and spends his life making the lives of others better is worth way more than that high school valedictorian who never did anything remarkable past high school. It always amazes me when the family gets together. Everyone listens to my BIL and he's the least intelligent of the bunch. At least according to IQ that is. However, he's the smartest of the bunch when it came to using what he had. He did way more with what he was born with than any of his brothers can dream of doing with theirs. THAT is what matters and that is why a lot of evening out happens. It isn't what we're born with that matters except in the broadest of senses. Most of us are capable of doing more than people a lot more intelligent (at least on tests) will actually do.

As to geniuses being misunderstood, I'd think they'd find each other if that were the case and I'd think when they did (like Mensa or the high IQ society) you'd be seeing some fantastic ideas coming from those groups. I don't really see that happening. At least not any more than I see it elsewhere in society.

Last edited by Ivorytickler; 11-02-2009 at 08:12 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2009, 07:42 PM
 
2,180 posts, read 3,187,506 times
Reputation: 838
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivorytickler View Post
There are far more "gifted" children than gifted adults that's for sure.
Oddly enough, no, there aren't.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-02-2009, 11:13 PM
hsw
 
2,144 posts, read 6,200,739 times
Reputation: 1507
Ultimately, pseudo-precise, pseudo-objective terms like "IQ", "smart", "clever", "fool", etc are subjective, qualitative judgments best determined not by any one test score or teacher or prof or interview but rather over a period of yrs through one's educational and professional career achievements in a competitive setting

By about age 30, one's career trajectory and net worth in context of peers reveals much, and one's ability to change much is decreased (sort of like most pro athletes by age 30); esp in industries like tech or finance, many of most talented and successful choose to become semi-retired by their mid-30s

Many of today's smartest and wealthiest guys are college dropouts or merely have undergrad degrees in engineering or finance or dropped out of Stanford's CompSci PhD program....best judge of one's IQ/work ethic/shrewdness, etc is "the market": one's high-powered professors at leading colleges (who've seen many young stars over decades), high-powered employers (that routinely hire top 10% of class from leading colleges), customers, investors, competitors, employees, etc

Some of worst judges of IQ/career potential are lifelong educators/admissions bureaucrats who have themselves never shown high achievement in an intellectually rigorous quant field of study or business: thus, many issues of simple ignorance of skills needed for real-world competitive achievement and/or jealousy vs other fields of study or those who are perceived as intellectually threatening or one-dimensional, etc (many of highest achievers in tech or finance are not necessarily personable guys who play well with others, nor hesitant to express intellectual superiority over others...and often behave that way from ~age 4 onwards)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2009, 12:07 AM
 
871 posts, read 1,414,113 times
Reputation: 438
People with Highest IQ | Cute and Weird

people right now known to have the highest iq's are not necessarily the ones who have made the greatest impact on the world or even major breakthroughs or inventions. ex: bill gates, who is the second richest man on earth is not even on the list and he's made a greater effect on the world than all of those people.

having a high iq is not everything, it's just a part of the picture.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2009, 04:44 AM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,476 posts, read 16,972,235 times
Reputation: 4304
Talking about IQs....lowers your IQ a good 10 points. Oops...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2009, 05:11 AM
 
Location: Whoville....
25,393 posts, read 29,708,331 times
Reputation: 14495
Quote:
Originally Posted by hsw View Post
Ultimately, pseudo-precise, pseudo-objective terms like "IQ", "smart", "clever", "fool", etc are subjective, qualitative judgments best determined not by any one test score or teacher or prof or interview but rather over a period of yrs through one's educational and professional career achievements in a competitive setting

By about age 30, one's career trajectory and net worth in context of peers reveals much, and one's ability to change much is decreased (sort of like most pro athletes by age 30); esp in industries like tech or finance, many of most talented and successful choose to become semi-retired by their mid-30s

Many of today's smartest and wealthiest guys are college dropouts or merely have undergrad degrees in engineering or finance or dropped out of Stanford's CompSci PhD program....best judge of one's IQ/work ethic/shrewdness, etc is "the market": one's high-powered professors at leading colleges (who've seen many young stars over decades), high-powered employers (that routinely hire top 10% of class from leading colleges), customers, investors, competitors, employees, etc

Some of worst judges of IQ/career potential are lifelong educators/admissions bureaucrats who have themselves never shown high achievement in an intellectually rigorous quant field of study or business: thus, many issues of simple ignorance of skills needed for real-world competitive achievement and/or jealousy vs other fields of study or those who are perceived as intellectually threatening or one-dimensional, etc (many of highest achievers in tech or finance are not necessarily personable guys who play well with others, nor hesitant to express intellectual superiority over others...and often behave that way from ~age 4 onwards)
Well said.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2009, 06:12 AM
 
Location: Bradenton, Florida
27,236 posts, read 40,273,555 times
Reputation: 10915
I'm thinking there's a difference between theory and application.

I can design you a chair, or a bookcase, or a shelving unit--but don't ask me to put it together for you. That takes someone who can APPLY that knowledge.

I realize it was a TV program, but The Colony had this very same issue. There was an engineer very good at DESIGNING things, and coming up with the ideas--but he consulted a "handyman" who purported to have no college education whatsoever to put it into practice.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2009, 06:15 AM
 
Location: Bradenton, Florida
27,236 posts, read 40,273,555 times
Reputation: 10915
Additionally, there have been indications that "gifted" does not necessarily imply a high IQ. The kid that can play Mozart on the piano by age 4 doesn't necessarily have a high IQ, but IS "gifted". Some have a talent for athletics, some a talent for leadership, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-03-2009, 06:16 AM
 
Location: Under the SUNNY WARM SUN ....
14,939 posts, read 10,007,295 times
Reputation: 17529
(Didn't read the entire thread)

I personally know smart people (college material) lacking common sense.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Psychology
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top