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Old 09-07-2016, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
41,034 posts, read 32,728,581 times
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There's a huge difference between being smart and being wise.
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Old 09-08-2016, 01:15 AM
 
Location: Our own little Loonyverse
237 posts, read 177,548 times
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There is a quote is oft attributed to Einstein but since it didn't make his book of famous quotes most believe it came later but have no idea who first came up with it. Regardless of who the original author is, it's a favorite of mine. I absolutely love it and believe it to be true.

“Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.” The question I have for you at this point of our journey together is, “What is your genius?

We all have things we are good at, and if we put in the time and effort, we can become an expert regardless of how well we score on a stupid test. In high school, we all had to take those standardized tests and some of us got suckered into taking more. I was invited to join mensa but declined, just not my thing, they even called my mother but she let me make my own decision. Honestly, I am good at some things and suck at others- just like everyone else. I test well but I am not particularly a brainiac imo.

I believed something others of you have noticed as well - that many "genius" level brains have not a lick of common sense when it comes to real world situations. I would much rather have practical skills, I think most people would (except those braggarts that were mentioned in an earlier post).
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Old 09-08-2016, 08:58 AM
 
332 posts, read 169,190 times
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I noticed a lot of people here associated people who were a genius/book smart do not have any common sense, likewise people who seem to think they are just so highly intelligent but they are really arrogant....interesting!

I feel like there are different types and levels of "intelligence" that varies based on the individual and personality type/environment growing up...we have: book smarts, street smarts, emotional intelligence, wise, genius, arrogance, common sense (or lack of), cunning/sly (insert other synonyms here), social smarts, intuitive, i think the list goes on! I feel like all of this should be explored more with people to..i guess..encourage us to get out of what is normal for us and discover new things about ourselves if that makes sense.
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Old 09-08-2016, 03:19 PM
 
25,415 posts, read 24,177,367 times
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I'm the opposite, actually. People often think I'm very bright, but I'm not. My IQ is decidedly average, and I can act pretty much like a box of rocks at times.

I have no idea why this is. I can only link it to the way I speak/write/type...I sound like someone who is bright/educated (nope and nope...I'm working on that latter, though), at least sometimes and to some people, and on some topics.
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Old 09-08-2016, 03:20 PM
 
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Intelligence and Wisdom are two completely different qualities.
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Old 09-08-2016, 04:17 PM
 
25,415 posts, read 24,177,367 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dddiva View Post
There is a quote is oft attributed to Einstein but since it didn't make his book of famous quotes most believe it came later but have no idea who first came up with it. Regardless of who the original author is, it's a favorite of mine. I absolutely love it and believe it to be true.

“Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.” The question I have for you at this point of our journey together is, “What is your genius?

We all have things we are good at, and if we put in the time and effort, we can become an expert regardless of how well we score on a stupid test. In high school, we all had to take those standardized tests and some of us got suckered into taking more. I was invited to join mensa but declined, just not my thing, they even called my mother but she let me make my own decision. Honestly, I am good at some things and suck at others- just like everyone else. I test well but I am not particularly a brainiac imo.

I believed something others of you have noticed as well - that many "genius" level brains have not a lick of common sense when it comes to real world situations. I would much rather have practical skills, I think most people would (except those braggarts that were mentioned in an earlier post).
What a fantastic post.
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Old 09-08-2016, 09:21 PM
 
13,018 posts, read 12,460,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swgirl926 View Post
Meh. I took the MENSA test and got in. Fine, but sometimes I think that it was more of a curse than anything else. My parents put so much pressure on me to be smart that I grew up terrified of making a mistake. These tests measure aptitude, that's all. It by no means indicates that someone knows everything. It can really interfere with learning persistance, IMO. I'd get frustrated if I couldn't get something on the first try and abandon it. I've been spending my whole life trying to overcome that. I don't care about a test or being on Jeopardy or anything like that. I care about knowing that I don't have to know everything and that there is always an opportunity to learn. I am more proud that I worked hard and bought a house on my own, and was able to do my own renovations. That has been way more satisfying. The ability to pass a test is but one very small piece of the puzzle. Like people have said upthread, someone who is very smart but who grew up in a household where the parents are neglectful or downright abusive is going to have an uphill battle. The kids who have less supposed intelligence but who have the proper support and guidance are going to go much farther. I know far too many people who are bright and have nothing to show for it but a string of menial jobs (not like net worth or occupation is a true measure of a person, but that is another topic). I am trying to strike a balance between book smarts, the humility to know that there is so much more to learn, emotional intelligence, technical skills, "street smarts" and compassion, among other things. I don't need to be the smartest person in the room, but it is far more important for me to be happy. That, to me, it what life is about. Not doing well on a test.
I have to say that some of the people I respect the most are people who work menial jobs, aren't what one would traditionally consider "smart" but have a ton of emotional intelligence. My one neighbor was a construction worker who was in his 40s when I was in my 20s. He was often unemployed due to the cyclical nature of his work. But his steady-mindedness, practicality, kindness and realistic optimism made merely being in his presence a true pleasure. I learned a lot from him at a time when I was young and struggling with a lot of personal issues. His sense of priorities and how he treated other people opened my eyes on what was really important. He was kind of like a zen teacher, and I really miss him. He moved away and we lost touch (this was in the days before facebook). When I find people like that these days, I value their presence in my life and am careful to keep them in it.

I must say though, that frustrated or unnurtured intelligence is a huge tragedy in my eyes. I've known a lot of people who are brilliant, but grew up very poor and/or neglected. Watching them struggle is almost physically painful to me.
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Old 09-08-2016, 10:17 PM
 
1,389 posts, read 547,599 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dhanu86 View Post
Hah yea it just means u know a lot of random garbage.. like those so called geniouses on that show Jepordy, none of that knowledge is practical in the real world. Einstein said reading to many books is a lazy way of not thinking, it went something like that.
Those Jeopardy people have brains that can remember a TON of facts. I know plenty of people who have a TON of information on one subject. Teachers are the same way, especially at college level. It's also like students in high school or college who just sit and listen and never take notes who aces tests. Damn those kind of people.
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Old 09-12-2016, 04:42 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
41,034 posts, read 32,728,581 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sas318 View Post
Those Jeopardy people have brains that can remember a TON of facts. I know plenty of people who have a TON of information on one subject. Teachers are the same way, especially at college level. It's also like students in high school or college who just sit and listen and never take notes who aces tests. Damn those kind of people.
I have a Jeopardy type of brain but I can't grasp theoretical or abstract math concepts at all. Nor am I a bit of good at memorizing things like speeches, which is weird since I have a brain that recalls all sorts of useless information about things like who was involved in the northern England uprisings during the Reformation, who wrote "A Man For All Seasons" and when and which actors played in which movie version, the historical temperatures for April in Newfoundland, and where tumeric originated and it's uses in both cooking and medicine.

So there you have it.

I also have what I call "realistic" (aka "common") sense, but I nearly always forget my grocery list. Thank goodness for grocery list apps for Android. But then I'm likely to leave my phone in the car and then try to wing it. And forget something very necessary, like toilet paper.
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Old 09-12-2016, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Outside of Chicago
4,598 posts, read 3,752,910 times
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Outside of placing kids in the right classes, IQ tests have practically zero value outside of boosting fragile egos.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I have a Jeopardy type of brain but I can't grasp theoretical or abstract math concepts at all. Nor am I a bit of good at memorizing things like speeches, which is weird since I have a brain that recalls all sorts of useless information about things like who was involved in the northern England uprisings during the Reformation, who wrote "A Man For All Seasons" and when and which actors played in which movie version, the historical temperatures for April in Newfoundland, and where tumeric originated and it's uses in both cooking and medicine.

So there you have it.

I also have what I call "realistic" (aka "common") sense, but I nearly always forget my grocery list. Thank goodness for grocery list apps for Android. But then I'm likely to leave my phone in the car and then try to wing it. And forget something very necessary, like toilet paper.
Mathematical patterns are fascinating...there really is beauty to numbers.

Take three consecutive numbers: a,b,c...a*c=d; d+1=b^2
Or the difference between square numbers...d(a+b)...or cube numbers: d(a*b)+d(a^2+b^2)
(a*b) = b^2+ (d*b) or a^2 – (d*a)…b=the small of the two numbers and a=the larger of the two numbers;
a*b=c…[(c*a)/b= a^2] & [(c*b)/a=b^2)]…
The difference between consecutive even (or odd) numbers squared divided by four is the number between them… ((a^2-c^2)/4=b)

I got into this when I was in Calculus and got sick of doing page long problems, so I found shortcuts and then branched out to other maths. Two cheers for curiosity and laziness. LOL

As for Jeopardy...as long as it isn't literature or art I'm usually pretty good.
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