U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill, Cary
 [Register]
Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill, Cary The Triangle Area
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-19-2012, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Triangle Area
66 posts, read 81,452 times
Reputation: 42
Default suggestions for schools for kids with LDs

I know this question was hashed out years ago. I'm curious about your more recent experiences.

I have a child who has a reading disability. She's 1 year to 2 years ahead of grade level in math. It's taken her 3 years of school to learn to read. Over the summer of 2011, we met an extraordinary EC teacher who learned that my child is a visual learner. Using familiar sights to demonstrate the sounds those letters make, my daughter went from not reading simple words such as "can" to reading more complex words such as "breech" and attempting words such as "adventure". All of this was accomplished in 25 ninety-minute sessions. Literally amazing!

The teacher went on to a new teaching job in another county. We're happy for her as she's truly talented and wonderful person.

My daughter began 2nd grade with a new lease on life - excited about reading and learning. The 2nd grade students were more accomplished readers but my daughter was determined. As the school year progressed, she became more frustrated and got further behind. She began bringing 1-2 hours of home work home each night. She began hating school again.

After 2 mostly unsuccessful months in 2nd grade, I moved her to special school for kids with LDs. They began teaching her elementary words - below her reading level. She has forgotten many of the rules and words she learned with the extraordinary teacher over the summer.

She's actually quite intelligent and once she learns something, she wants to move on (who doesn't?). At this rate, she will not be prepared to go to 3rd grade.

Repetition/memorization used by public schools does not work for most kids with LDs. It certainly does not work for my child.

I'm frustrated with the current situation but I think she can prevail! My biggest question is what to do next year.

Any suggestions?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-19-2012, 09:41 AM
 
1,832 posts, read 2,984,492 times
Reputation: 1078
The ONLY regular school I know of here is the Fletcher Academy. It's very expensive but they say it is really great. There is also the Trilogy school The Trilogy School, and I think there you can go part time or use it supplementally to "regular" school. The other suggestion i'd have is to find another great tutor and have him/her work with your child a couple times a week, but that seems to hard on the kid.

I wouldn't suggest another private school b/c they're usually just not equipped to deal with kids with learning disabilities.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2012, 10:13 AM
 
1,749 posts, read 1,934,348 times
Reputation: 1737
We are going through a similar situation but at an earlier age. We recently pulled our 5 year old son from K and put him back into preschool. Our hope is that an extra year of maturity will help him overcome some of his issues and also give us some breathing room to work with him. We figured that was better than having him complete K and then be retained at the end of the year.

So we have the same question - where to put him in the upcoming school year? We have looked at Lucy Daniels, but it is a little too far as an every day option and they seem to concentrate on younger kids. We are also starting to look at private options (we are in southern Wake).

Have you looked at learning centers such as BrainBalance (Cary) and LearningRX (N Raleigh)? I know they are controversial and expensive but some parents report positive results.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2012, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Triangle Area
66 posts, read 81,452 times
Reputation: 42
Thank you annesg! Both Trilogy and Fletcher Academy sound great! The low student to teacher ratios are what we need as well as teachers skilled in working with students who have LDs. So, they are schools to consider. I failed to mention I live in Chatham County. Something closer to Apex, west Cary or south Chapel Hill would be a much easier commute.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2012, 10:19 AM
 
1,749 posts, read 1,934,348 times
Reputation: 1737
Quote:
Originally Posted by annesg View Post
The ONLY regular school I know of here is the Fletcher Academy. It's very expensive but they say it is really great. There is also the Trilogy school The Trilogy School, and I think there you can go part time or use it supplementally to "regular" school. The other suggestion i'd have is to find another great tutor and have him/her work with your child a couple times a week, but that seems to hard on the kid.

I wouldn't suggest another private school b/c they're usually just not equipped to deal with kids with learning disabilities.
Wow, Fletcher Academy, $21K a year just to get you started. My only hope is if my m-i-l carks it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2012, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Triangle Area
66 posts, read 81,452 times
Reputation: 42
Yeah! Fletcher Academy at $21K! OUCH! Didn't notice it at first but when I did, I almost lost it! However, if I'm not mistaken, if you have a kid with a diagnosed LD and a supporting IEP, the tuition MAY be tax deductible. Speak to a CPA b/c I do not know this for sure.

BrainBalance (Cary) is something to consider. I'll check in to it. Thanks! LearningRX in No Raleigh is too much of a commute.

My daughter was being tutored after school a few months ago but it was just too much for her after spending a full day in school. The tutor is extraordinary. (I was blessed finding 2 superior tutors for 2011.) He had suffered severe dyslexia and did not learn to read until he was 12. So he could identify and sympathize with us. He also recognized it was too much pressure for her. So we stopped.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2012, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Triangle Area
66 posts, read 81,452 times
Reputation: 42
SaucyAussie: I can relate to your plight. Sometimes retention works. Sometimes it makes the situation worse. We retained my daughter in K, even though I was against it. All of her friends went to 1st grade. She cried for 6 months. At the end of her 2nd time in K, she was no further ahead than she was at the end her first round in K (for reading and writing). And, she was/is so advanced in math, she was/is bored out of her mind in everything but reading and writing. My husband has regretted his decision to make her repeat K.

The teachers tried to tell me the reason for her under performance was maturity. I disagreed. She's mature enough to excel at math, science and social studies but not reading and writing. Donkey dung!

Now she's almost 9 years old and in the 2nd grade. If she progresses without any additional retentions, she will be 16 y.o. in the 9th grade. Most kids in 9th grade are 14; some turning 15 before the school year ends. Personally, I feel kids that kids much older than their peers are more risk to drop out of school.

But, I'm also against advancing under performing kids for social reasons. Tough call either way.

If you want to talk more, send me a DM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2012, 01:33 PM
 
1,832 posts, read 2,984,492 times
Reputation: 1078
Quote:
Originally Posted by rmccarty View Post
SaucyAussie: I can relate to your plight. Sometimes retention works. Sometimes it makes the situation worse. We retained my daughter in K, even though I was against it. All of her friends went to 1st grade. She cried for 6 months. At the end of her 2nd time in K, she was no further ahead than she was at the end her first round in K (for reading and writing). And, she was/is so advanced in math, she was/is bored out of her mind in everything but reading and writing. My husband has regretted his decision to make her repeat K.

The teachers tried to tell me the reason for her under performance was maturity. I disagreed. She's mature enough to excel at math, science and social studies but not reading and writing. Donkey dung!

Now she's almost 9 years old and in the 2nd grade. If she progresses without any additional retentions, she will be 16 y.o. in the 9th grade. Most kids in 9th grade are 14; some turning 15 before the school year ends. Personally, I feel kids that kids much older than their peers are more risk to drop out of school.

But, I'm also against advancing under performing kids for social reasons. Tough call either way.

If you want to talk more, send me a DM.

Wow, I hear you both!!! My 16yo stepdaughter is in 9th grade. She has friends who started 19th grade at 13 (she was 15 until January). It's not easy. She has profound LD and we considered Fletcher but really cannot afford it (I've been there to see a speaker and met some teachers and was REALLY impressed). Her high school has been really really good about helping her adapt at her level--which is great, but it took us a few thousand $$$in testing to get them moving. In the younger years you can't really differentiate the way you can in middle and high school.

My husband is dyslexic and didn't get a dx until he was in high school and pretty much nothing was done even then. He's landed on his feet and done really well thanks to an amazing h.s. art teacher. Public school is really tough if you have any kind of non-average, middle of the road kind of learning styles and skills. I went to private schools so I was lucky. I'm not enjoying the public school experience with my kids so far.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2012, 02:01 PM
 
4,551 posts, read 4,675,934 times
Reputation: 2351
Quote:
Originally Posted by annesg View Post
She has friends who started 19th grade at 13 (she was 15 until January).
Halfway through grad school by the age of 13? They must be geniuses!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2012, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, NC (formerly Vienna, VA)
5,838 posts, read 5,974,509 times
Reputation: 4340
I may be off-base here because I don't have experience with LD or Chatham County schools, I know that all schools are not created equal AND not all teachers are created equal, but, my suggestion to you if you cannot afford $21K for the school mentioned above (or don't want to spend that much) is to talk to anyone and everyone that you know in the school district who has experience with LD or perhaps similar special needs. Find out which teacher is the BEST teacher to get for your child in 3rd grade. Which teacher would be the best fit for her (regarding her needs and personality). Then find out what services she is entitled to from the school (pull out during language arts to meet with a special ed teacher in a smaller setting, an aide that comes in the classroom, etc.,). Does she have an IEP? The more iinformed you are, the better chance of having a good fit for your daughter next year.

I am suggesting this, because the success a student has in school usually comes down to the teacher. It could be the worst school in the world, but if there's a dynamic teacher, she will learn a lot. And vice versa. I have seen it in my daughter's school. There is one EXCELLENT Kindergarten teacher who is great at handling the kids with special needs. (She's been teaching for 36+ years, but it doesn't have to be an older teacher.) Having a different K teacher in the same school would be quite frustrating for a child with special needs. Parents with kids in the upper grades at your school are usually the best to ask about teacher repuation, but make sure it is the best teacher to meet YOUR kid's needs. Not every teacher is good for every kid. And then advocate to get your child into that "best" teacher's classroom.

Caveat: I really know nothing about special education. I suggest you vist the education forum on C-D. The people on there are a wealth of knowledge regarding IEPs, special needs, advocating for your child, etc. I think you'll get some good ideas, even if they are not specific to Chatham County.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill, Cary
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top