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Old 08-26-2012, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Containment Area for Relocated Yankees
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I'll admit that I know nothing about raising chickens, but doesn't a .13 acre lot seem awfully small to allow five chickens in the backyard? That's a tiny lot where you're right on top of your neighbors. If I lived on that size lot, there's no way I wouldn't see, hear and smell those chickens if my neighbor had them. I'm going to assume that most neighborhoods with lots that size will have HOAs that will enact rules to ban the chickens.
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Old 08-26-2012, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WorkingMomof2 View Post
I'll admit that I know nothing about raising chickens, but doesn't a .13 acre lot seem awfully small to allow five chickens in the backyard? That's a tiny lot where you're right on top of your neighbors. If I lived on that size lot, there's no way I wouldn't see, hear and smell those chickens if my neighbor had them. I'm going to assume that most neighborhoods with lots that size will have HOAs that will enact rules to ban the chickens.
Yes, most lots that size will have an HOA. But also, chickens will not make any more smell than any other pet as long as you clean up the waste. We had a lot that size in our last house and we have a 75lb dog. There's no doubt that it is a small lot, and we had to pick up the waste regularly. Five chickens weigh less and make less waste than my 75lb dog.
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Old 08-27-2012, 08:50 AM
 
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You also said your goal is to grow as much food as possible. Cary is absolutely not the place for that. I'm sure HOAs have all kinds of rules against it.

Look at this YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/growingyourgreens

This guy has more than 600 videos on YouTube and originally did YouTube videos only about his front yard in California where he turned every inch of his small yard into an edible garden. Incredible. He's now expanded to visiting other gardens in other states. John, the guy in the video, is an expert and enthusiastically shares everything he knows.

I think as food prices continue to skyrocket (due to droughts, fuel prices, whatever), more people will become interested in turning whatever land they have into productive gardens.

It's too bad Cary (and Raleigh) can't be on the forefront of the "very locally grown" movement and encourage responsible (neat and productive) front yard vegetable gardens. Instead, people use their time and resources (including lawnmowers which use ever-expensive gasoline, and they are a huge air polluter) for ... grass. It's crazy. http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/story?id=98532&page=1#.UDuPF6Os_Qo

I don't think bugging Cary politicians about chickens will do a thing. The only reason I didn't move to Cary nearly 20 years ago is because they used to have a 2-dog limit. I had 3 dogs. They are slow to change. Someone challenged the law, and Cary decided not to fight it. I'm glad I live in Raleigh.

Last edited by lovebrentwood; 08-27-2012 at 10:16 AM..
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Old 08-27-2012, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Cary, NC
8,264 posts, read 21,829,467 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovebrentwood View Post
You also said your goal is to grow as much food as possible. Cary is absolutely not the place for that. I'm sure HOAs have all kinds of rules against it.

Look at this YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/growingyourgreens

This guy has more than 600 videos on YouTube and originally did YouTube videos only about his front yard in California where he turned every inch of his small yard into an edible garden. Incredible. He's now expanded to visiting other gardens in other states. John, the guy in the video, is an expert and enthusiastically shares everything he knows.

I think as food prices continue to skyrocket (due to droughts, fuel prices, whatever), more people will become interested in turning whatever land they have into productive gardens.

It's too bad Cary (and Raleigh) can't be on the forefront of the "very locally grown" movement and encourage responsible (neat and productive) front yard vegetable gardens. Instead, people use their time and resources (including lawnmowers which use ever-expensive gasoline, and they are a huge air polluter) for ... grass. It's crazy. Study: Lawn Mowing Equals Car Trip - ABC News
I don't think bugging Cary politicians about chickens will do a thing. The only reason I didn't move to Cary nearly 20 years ago is because they used to have a 2-dog limit. I had 3 dogs. They are slow to change. Someone challenged the law, and Cary decided not to fight it. I'm glad I live in Raleigh.
The dog thing was over TEN years ago! Completely different people running the town now. I actually find Cary VERY responsive to change and citizen concerns. We have several community gardens, 2 farmer's markets and even a town sponsored composting program with FREE compost to town residents. I find Cary a very garden friendly area. I don't know much about HOA's restricting them (I'm sure they do) but I don't think it's any different from HOA's in any other town or city?
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Old 08-27-2012, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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Originally Posted by lamishra View Post
The dog thing was over TEN years ago! Completely different people running the town now. I actually find Cary VERY responsive to change and citizen concerns. We have several community gardens, 2 farmer's markets and even a town sponsored composting program with FREE compost to town residents. I find Cary a very garden friendly area. I don't know much about HOA's restricting them (I'm sure they do) but I don't think it's any different from HOA's in any other town or city?
I totally agree with this. They did just change the law to allow chickens, didn't they? And they did change the dog limit when the people asked. There is always going to be a balance between freedom and enough restriction so that people can live comfortably in close proximity in one another. It's different than living in the country where your own actions don't affect your neighbors as much. For me, it's worth some sacrifice to live closer to people and to have neighbors. I like neighbors! :-)

You would be surprised at how much food one can grow on a third of an acre, especially if you plan everything to be productive. You can grow numerous dwarf variety fruit trees, grape vines and berry brambles in addition to a vegetable garden. Using the square foot method, I only need about 400 SF of space to grow all the plants that my family eats. If I remember correctly, I allowed space for growing peanuts in that estimate as well. :-)
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Old 08-27-2012, 12:57 PM
 
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Originally Posted by lovebrentwood View Post
You also said your goal is to grow as much food as possible. Cary is absolutely not the place for that. I'm sure HOAs have all kinds of rules against it.
I grow all my vegetables in my front yard and nobody has complained so far. One of my neighbors yesterday told me she's keep an eye out for when my watermelons are big enough for picking
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Old 08-27-2012, 01:22 PM
 
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The OP was asking about Cary, not other HOAs. Whether they are the same or not is immaterial.

Cary didn't change the dog limit when people "asked." It was a challenge by one dog owner, and the town backed down -- most likely because it would have cost money to fight back and it wasn't worth it. They didn't even immediately change the law; they just decided not to prosecute.

Yes, neighbors are good to have. The OP wants to have chickens to feed a large family and grow a lot of food. Cary doesn't seem to be the ideal place for that.

I'd love to see a City-Data thread of people's vegetable gardens (and plenty of pics) with what works especially well in this area. I learned this year that full-sized tomato plants were not worth it. Last year's cherry tomatoes were incredible. I'd like to know what vegetables work best and take the least space.

The YouTube guy is great, but I'd love to learn about what works best around here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pegotty View Post
I totally agree with this. They did just change the law to allow chickens, didn't they? And they did change the dog limit when the people asked. There is always going to be a balance between freedom and enough restriction so that people can live comfortably in close proximity in one another. It's different than living in the country where your own actions don't affect your neighbors as much. For me, it's worth some sacrifice to live closer to people and to have neighbors. I like neighbors! :-)

You would be surprised at how much food one can grow on a third of an acre, especially if you plan everything to be productive. You can grow numerous dwarf variety fruit trees, grape vines and berry brambles in addition to a vegetable garden. Using the square foot method, I only need about 400 SF of space to grow all the plants that my family eats. If I remember correctly, I allowed space for growing peanuts in that estimate as well. :-)
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Old 08-27-2012, 01:27 PM
 
4,598 posts, read 8,645,122 times
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For me this year what has worked best are heirloom tomatoes that came from southern US sources, hot peppers (poblanos, shi****o, and habanero mostly), okra, cucumbers, goya, and in the beginning of the season zucchini though once we hit 100 degrees earlier this summer they were toast. My watermelons have been pretty pathetic but I think they're not getting enough light where I planted them. My burdock did terrible but I think that was from lack of watering on my part. Also had horrible luck with garlic this year. My tarragon and basil are beasts and I have no idea what I'm going to do with all of it. I'm starting to plan for fall though I think I'm a bit late to the game on that.

I really like this guide for vegetable gardening in our area: Home Vegetable Gardening
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Old 08-27-2012, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Cary, NC
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As far as I can say, Cary is a GREAT place for that. There are still many parts of the far western and southern Cary well suited for large farms and there are already many out there, not to mention the large lots with no HOA's in central Cary. There are many different parts of Cary suited for many different purposes. You should check out 2 of the community gardens located smack dab in the middle of downtown Cary and see how much they produce for their members and also give away to various local charities.
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Old 08-27-2012, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
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Originally Posted by evaofnc View Post
My tarragon and basil are beasts and I have no idea what I'm going to do with all of it.
throw it in a blender with a little water and freeze in ice cube trays. Or make a whole bunch of pesto and freeze the same way. Once frozen you can empty the cubes into ziplocs so you still have use of your trays.

I think the biggest hindrance to growing food on large lots in Cary is all the trees. We had a heck of a time finding a house that wasn't completely shaded.
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