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Old 09-26-2012, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
8,204 posts, read 10,858,129 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southernNE View Post
So no one goes over to the NC Mountains...Boone etc?
You wrote your question in the Raleigh/Durham forum, so of course people would answer the question for that area. There is more snow in the mountains, but that would be a question better suited in the Western NC forum or General NC if you're asking about lots of areas at once. Questions about Virginia snow should go in the Virginia forum.

Quote:
And I am assuming Durham weather is about the same as Raleigh for snowfall, then?
Here is a list of City-Data "pages" for every city/large town in NC. You can click on each and get lots of data, including a climate map that shows average temps and precipitation by month (yes, Raleigh and Durham get about the same amount).
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Old 09-26-2012, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, NC
8,527 posts, read 12,729,565 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by islander03 View Post
Our realtor did say that "everything shuts down" when there's several inches of snow. Now I believe her after reading everyone's posts.
It doesn't take even several inches of snow to shut everything down here.
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Old 09-26-2012, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Blue Ridge Mtns of NC
5,660 posts, read 18,368,130 times
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You can view the average seasonal snowfall amounts for Raleigh and other locations throughout the state here:

Historical Climate Summaries for North Carolina | Welcome - Southeast Regional Climate Center

The state record for a single snowstorm is around 60" in Swain county in 1987.
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Old 09-26-2012, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Carrboro, NC
678 posts, read 414,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poppydog View Post
I would say it's much less frequently than that that we get to measure snow by feet rather than inches. I'm an NC native and 48 yrs old. I NEVER remember seeing any other crazy snows like that here in the Triangle (lived in this part of NC since '82) in my lifetime. Six inches, sure, we've had that every 4 or 5 years or so, but not 13 or 20 inches.
When I said 'around a foot' I did mean around, not exactly, but it's right there in the historical record which was posted here on the first page. There tend to be two years in each decade, back to back, that have a large storm.

The 90s were an unusual exception... as people said earlier, the 90s were a warm snap.

And you came here in '82, so you just missed the March blizzard.

Quote:
Feb 26-27 2004 6.5 inches
Jan 2-3 2002 10.8 inches
Jan 24-25 2000 20.3 inches

Feb 17-18 1989 6.2 inches
Jan 7 1988 7.3 inches
Feb 6 1984 6.9 inches
Mar 24 1983 7.3 inches
Jan 13-14 1982 6.0 inches
Mar 1-2 1980 11.1 inches
Feb 18 1979 10.4 inches

Jan 7-8 1973 6.4 inches
March 1 1969 9.3 inches
Feb 9 1967 9.1 inches
Jan 25-27 1966 9.7 inches

Feb 26 1963 6.9 inches
March 9-10 1960 7.0 inches
March 2-3 1960 7.1 inches
Dec 11 1958 9.1 inches
Jan 19 1955 9.0 inches

Jan 30-Feb 1 1948 7.8 inches
You are right that the 2000 blizzard was the largest storm in recorded history here. Though there were storms in the early 20th century and 1800s that came close.
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Old 09-26-2012, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Chapelboro
3,995 posts, read 2,991,792 times
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Stay home and drink hot chocolate when it snows and have a staycation!

No snow tires needed here. We just don't drive in the stuff. If you really wanted to you could pick up a set of chains for the off chance you might decide you need to go somewhere.

The schools sometimes shut down even if there's a prediction of snow, but no snow on the ground yet.
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Old 09-26-2012, 09:24 PM
 
68 posts, read 48,178 times
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Snow does happen in the Mebane area, truly blizzard conditions will see us with about 6 inches of the white stuff. It is not exactly an annual event.
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Old 09-27-2012, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Chapelboro
3,995 posts, read 2,991,792 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vatnos View Post
When I said 'around a foot' I did mean around, not exactly, but it's right there in the historical record which was posted here on the first page.
...
And you came here in '82, so you just missed the March blizzard.
Vatnos, I've lived in NC all my life, which is 48 years so far — I was in elementary school in the 70s. I remember the 80s just fine, thanks. (FTR, My dad lived in NC all his life. I can trace my NC relatives back to the 1600s. I have plenty of stories of historical NC.)

What you said was:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vatnos View Post
We did get 2 feet of snow back in 2000, and then another 1 foot snowstorm the year after that. That tends to happen once every decade.
which is just incorrect. We DO NOT get 1 to 2 feet of snow every decade. You didn't say "about" a foot. I think a casual reader not familiar with NC winters like the original poster, would take your post to mean we get between 1 ft and 2 ft every decade which is just not true.

I'm not sure that the data that andyselec posted was accurate. He notes it was a broken link. Here are some active links with historical weather data.

Southeast Regional Climate Center at UNC

Note the average snowfall per month over the past 63.3 years which I have bolded. Not sure the table format will come through well, but the first number is the average snowfall for Jan and the second to last is the average snowfall for Dec and the last is the average snowfall annually over those past 63 years.

So the average yearly snowfall for the past 63 years is 6.8 inches and that includes those huge snowstorms in the 2000s. If you look at it month by month you see that we average 0.7" in Dec, 2.6" in Jan, 2.3 in Feb, and 1.1 in March.

Period of Record : 8/ 1/1948 to 4/30/2012

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Annual
Average Max. Temperature (F) 50.7 54.1 62.1 72.1 79.1 86.0 89.1 87.6 81.6 72.0 62.6 53.0 70.8
Average Min. Temperature (F) 30.1 32.0 38.6 47.0 55.7 64.0 68.3 67.3 60.7 48.5 39.1 32.1 48.6
Average Total Precipitation (in.) 3.44 3.26 3.85 2.88 3.54 3.57 4.59 4.45 3.89 2.99 3.05 3.09 42.59
Average Total SnowFall (in.) 2.6 2.3 1.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.7 6.8
Average Snow Depth (in.) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Percent of possible observations for period of record.


For a breakdown of snowfall year by year you can go to the Weather Warehouse page for RDU. If you look in the snowfall column you will see the two freaky huge snows in 2000 and 2002, but after that you have to go back to the 60s and 50s before you get a snowfall in double digits.

The March blizzard you refer to (March 2 1980) actually was measured at 9 inches at RDU according to wunderground (which is the site that WRAL references for their historical weather data). Nine inches is not a foot. That storm followed a not uncommon North Carolina snowfall pattern which occasionally causes eastern NC to get a big snow. If you look at this map of that March 2 1980 storm you can see that the snowfall east of I-95 was much heavier than the snow in the Triangle and the rest of the piedmont. Most of the time snow comes from the west and north and Greensboro and Winston-Salem and often Roxboro will get more than we do in the Triangle and eastern NC might not get any at all. Occasionally, though the storm comes up from the South or even the south east and that's when you get those big totals on the coast. That is more unusual, but it is not uncommon.

So, SouthernNE, we have very occasional freaky big snowstorms. Usually we consider 6 inches to be "big". You're far more likely to run into other extreme weather here like heat (almost always hits 100+ at least once a summer), tornadoes, hurricanes, tropical storms, etc.
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Old 09-27-2012, 10:33 AM
 
627 posts, read 619,476 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poppydog View Post
Stay home and drink hot chocolate when it snows and have a staycation!

No snow tires needed here. We just don't drive in the stuff. If you really wanted to you could pick up a set of chains for the off chance you might decide you need to go somewhere.

The schools sometimes shut down even if there's a prediction of snow, but no snow on the ground yet.
You will probably never see the snow you would use chains for. We don't even get that in Michigan hardly. My old neon would go through 12" of snow without an issue with a set of blizzaks. Winter tires do a better job in the snow on a fwd car than awd or 4x4 with all season tires.
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Old 09-27-2012, 03:22 PM
 
Location: Chapelboro
3,995 posts, read 2,991,792 times
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I agree, but chains are a lot cheaper and easier to deal with than a set of snow tires. I've been in a car that used chains a couple of times over the years, but never had to use them myself. If you just wanted peace of mind that you could get somewhere in a snowstorm (like to the doctor or to check on an elderly relative or something) you could have a $20 set of chains in the trunk. They take up minimal space and are cheap and easy to put on in an emergency. Chances are they would never be needed.

I would never recommend snow tires here. Four wheel drive is useful in the mountains, but I'm not sure people even do snow tires in Boone.
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Old 09-27-2012, 04:40 PM
 
176 posts, read 230,948 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Francois View Post
You wrote your question in the Raleigh/Durham forum, so of course people would answer the question for that area. There is more snow in the mountains, but that would be a question better suited in the Western NC forum or General NC if you're asking about lots of areas at once. Questions about Virginia snow should go in the Virginia forum.



Here is a list of City-Data "pages" for every city/large town in NC. You can click on each and get lots of data, including a climate map that shows average temps and precipitation by month (yes, Raleigh and Durham get about the same amount).
I was asking if people from Durham/Raleigh GO to Boone for the snow or mountains....not information about Boone. That is legit enough to ask, right? How would people in Boone know if people from Durham went there?

And most people answered at that point in the post, that they go to Virginia. I didn't even ask anything about that.

Someone did reply that they go to the Boone area, and have for years, so that answers my question. Thanks for the replies everyone!
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